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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've seen various devices and suggestions about tying down the bike while searching the forum. Can some of you please point me to the definitive tie-down instructions for the Wee? If a couple of people agree on the "right" way to tie down, then I'll try it!
Call me nervous... but that's my deal. Thank you! Jon G., Arlington MA
DL650K5
R1200CM
 

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Buy a Condor wheel chock. Locks the front wheel so no pull downs are necessary. Snug up the back wheel and good to go. I have trailered and hauled in the back of the pickup dirt bikes and an FJR and the Wee.
Otherwise use the lower triple clamp, soft tie on each side, and cinch to each side tie down. I always put two straps on the rear wheel, one to each side for good measure.
 

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Canyon Dancer

Get ahold of a Canyon Dancer tie-down strap. I think they're $30-40. Slip over the handlebars and have loops extended so the tiedown straps don't rub the plastic.

+1 on the wheel chock if you can manage. I use a Sport Chock.

For the rear, I generally would go from the passenger peg mounts.

Or you could just ride it.

Cheers...
 

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Hauled my wee several times and the most secure way is to get 5 ties.

1. Butt the front wheel to a hard surface... IE: front bar of trailer.... and place a tie through the wheel to the bar to hold it forward. this will also help the bike from leaning.

2. Soft ties under the headlights on the fork, one on each side and compress the springs about 80%, they'll bounce back I promise...

3. Rear ties attach to the rack or somewhere where you can compress the rear spring. Again about 80% one on each side.

Easiest way is to have someone sit on the bike and hold it vertical, if you are doing it alone, put the kick stand down and tighten the opposite sidem but make sure there is tension on the kick stand side. use the straps to straighten the bike out, then start alternating sides with tightening so as not to pull the bike to one side or another. Also, make sure you either tie the excess strap down or tape it to itself so it doesn't flap around and scratch your bike up. I've done it this way for a trip from Texas to Oklahoma and back, also from Texas to Louisiana, and when I bought the bike and couldn't ride it home... hasn't failed me yet.
 

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Buy a Condor wheel chock. Locks the front wheel so no pull downs are necessary. Snug up the back wheel and good to go. I have trailered and hauled in the back of the pickup dirt bikes and an FJR and the Wee.
Otherwise use the lower triple clamp, soft tie on each side, and cinch to each side tie down. I always put two straps on the rear wheel, one to each side for good measure.
Do not, I repeat, do not use a Canyon Dancer rig on the V-Strom. If you bang it around too much, the bars rotate down in the clamps and the bike falls over or hangs on one side of the bars, bending the bars.

I brought my brandy new DL1000 home using a Canyon Dancer rig in an enclosed trailer. I got quite a shock when I got home.

I also suggest not trusting a Condor chock completely. I use one in my garage to hold the V-Strom upright while it is parked. The bike can still tilt a whole bunch if you don't have some straps to steady it. The Condor with straps on the sides or triple trees works very well. I wish I had put the Condor in the trailer when I brought it home. It would have saved me the cost of new handlebars.
 

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I used 18" soft tiedowns on the handlebars down thru the fairing, this put the Ancra tiedown hooks at the bottom of the fairing where they couldn't damage anything. The front hooks can only be about a foot on either side of the front wheel so I used another set of soft straps and tiedowns on the rear grab rails, it worked great.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Triple clamp it is....

And the winner seems to be the triple clamp, yes? So the lower one, I presume, and run a soft strap diagonally across to the opposite side tie down. Here's the top view:

and the bottom, which is where I assume you're suggesting to tie down, not over the female part of the slider.
Bottom view:


Am I summarizing this alright??

I was wondering about that Canyon Dancer, it seemed too good to be true. Maybe with a chock, but then again, rental trailers don't have chocks. Yeah, I'd rather ride. But from Boston to Nashville is an awful lot of highway. Once you're south of the Mason Dixon line it's a whole lot nicer. The northeast corridor kind of sucks.

Thank you very much, guys. Jon.
 

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I was wondering about that Canyon Dancer, it seemed too good to be true. Maybe with a chock, but then again, rental trailers don't have chocks. Yeah, I'd rather ride. But from Boston to Nashville is an awful lot of highway. Once you're south of the Mason Dixon line it's a whole lot nicer. The northeast corridor kind of sucks.
The Canyon Dancer is slick for sport bikes and scooters with two piece bars.

The fairing gets in the way of regular tie-downs on the V-strom, making the Condor and Canyon Dancer a good setup. You don't have to torque it down too much so you don't have the danger of pulling the bars down.

The next time, if ever, I trailer the V-Strom, I'll post pictures.
 

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Hauled my wee several times and the most secure way is to get 5 ties.

1. Butt the front wheel to a hard surface... IE: front bar of trailer.... and place a tie through the wheel to the bar to hold it forward. this will also help the bike from leaning.

2. Soft ties under the headlights on the fork, one on each side and compress the springs about 80%, they'll bounce back I promise...

3. Rear ties attach to the rack or somewhere where you can compress the rear spring. Again about 80% one on each side.

Easiest way is to have someone sit on the bike and hold it vertical, if you are doing it alone, put the kick stand down and tighten the opposite sidem but make sure there is tension on the kick stand side. use the straps to straighten the bike out, then start alternating sides with tightening so as not to pull the bike to one side or another. Also, make sure you either tie the excess strap down or tape it to itself so it doesn't flap around and scratch your bike up. I've done it this way for a trip from Texas to Oklahoma and back, also from Texas to Louisiana, and when I bought the bike and couldn't ride it home... hasn't failed me yet.
That's basically what I do.
In the van, I've got a Pingel pop-chock to put the front wheel in. Soft-ties around the fork tubes above the lower triple. Run the straps to eyebolts mounted in the floor. At the rear soft-ties around the passenger grab rails. The rear doesn't need to be compressed as much as the front. One more soft tie around the frame with the strap running straight back. That's insurance against the bike coming forward in an accident.
In a trailer I omit the last one.
Many, many thousands of miles hauling race bikes this way, never a problem, and worked fine with the Strom too.
 

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Do not, I repeat, do not use a Canyon Dancer rig on the V-Strom. If you bang it around too much, the bars rotate down in the clamps and the bike falls over or hangs on one side of the bars, bending the bars.
Yikes! Not being a scientist or anything, I can't see how the load delivered by the canyon dancer on the bars would be that much different than the load you put on it riding. Imagine landing a wheelie or a small jump, or even a panic stop with a little poorer technique than intended.

I can see all hell breaking loose if the bars are too loose and rotate, removing tension from the tie-downs and letting the bike fall partially over. But I'd say you might have had a problem with the bars not being secure enough to begin with.

I say this having hauled my Wee with the Canyon Dancer/Sport Chock exactly once. With no trouble, of course. But I do haul my SV (admittedly a race bike with clip-ons) about 2 dozen times a year with that setup and have never had a problem.
 

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My bike was purchased in Arlington but I bought it in Newton. A full sized pickup makes it pretty easy.
 

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I can see all hell breaking loose if the bars are too loose and rotate, removing tension from the tie-downs and letting the bike fall partially over. But I'd say you might have had a problem with the bars not being secure enough to begin with.

I say this having hauled my Wee with the Canyon Dancer/Sport Chock exactly once. With no trouble, of course. But I do haul my SV (admittedly a race bike with clip-ons) about 2 dozen times a year with that setup and have never had a problem.
That is certainly a possibility. I tested the bolts and they seemed pretty tight. I wanted to blame the final assembly. It would have saved me the price of replacing the bars. Unfortunately, I could find no fault with the assembly.

In any case, I won't use the CD rig again without the Condor chock on the front.

Normally, I'm hauling antique bikes and scooters in the trailer. I shopped around for this bike, saving over $1,000 and had to pick it up a good distance from home without help. I don't expect to have to trailer it again under normal circumstances.
 

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I have seen bars broken and damaged from using the canyon dancers only. Also some of the controls on the bars can get broken from the cd pinching and putting pressure on the things attached to the bars. If you use a front chock and use the lower triple clams with the rear wheel secured it ain't going nowhere.
 

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hauling

When I hauled my bike over vail pass this last spring, I got some GSXR straps from the "motorcycle/atv parts liquidation" place for about 1/2 price. I am sure they still cost more than regular straps, but I had a little faith that the ties would be motorcycle appropriate this way. They have soft ties (the strap loops about a foot and come back to a hook) and those pull/friction style tighteners (no big ass ratcheting assembly). I pulled into the bed of my ranger pickup against the front. FYI, the wee is heavy and long. I had to put a little more air in my rear tires and the tailgate won't close with the bike in. The straps looped over the lower triple clamp on the front and down to the built-in tie points on the truck and I squashed it down 50-75% probably. I also tied from the rack using the same soft ties on the back (4 straps total) to the rear built-in tie points. I could sit on the seat and wiggle back and forth and it would just wiggle the truck on its suspension. It didn't move a bit the whole way over the pass, taking the curves at maximum lean angle in the truck :p

It sticks up, so I leaned my windshield back on the madstad mount to help with aerodynamics/fuel economy. Only got 19MPG :( .. but it was really nice when I went through that blizzard up high there.

Tommy
 

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More tie down stuff

I haul my Wee to Austin from New Oreans and back a few times a year. I had been carrying in the back of my Dakota, strapped and compressed front and rear. I just got a utility trailer and now have front wheel chocks built in. I have been told that it is best to secure in a way that lets the bike ride on its own suspension. My brother trailers his race bike to the track that way and he says that it is a much smoother ride and easier on the bike too. The trailer hits a bump, the bike suspension gives too. No more jerking against the tie down straps. I have observed this by looking in my rearview mirror. It seems no matter how much I compress, when ever I hit a bump, the straps flap in the wind until the bike snaps back up against them. I can see how that could break handlebars.
Still, havent had a chance to use it yet. Not really sure how either.
 

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Has anybody used their crashbars as tie-down points? I'm a little nervous about using the lower triple-tree as it seems like straps will put some pressure on the edges of the lower fairing if I have a wide strap angle (which is better for stability). So I was thinking about hooking onto my SW-Motech crashbars. Anybody done that?
 

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Yep.

That is the tie point that I use to my P/U sides, the crash bars. Done it about 3 times in the last few months for a 9 hour ride. Works well so far, no deformation or scratches. That and the rear passenger grip handles.
 

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Has anybody used their crashbars as tie-down points? I'm a little nervous about using the lower triple-tree as it seems like straps will put some pressure on the edges of the lower fairing if I have a wide strap angle (which is better for stability). So I was thinking about hooking onto my SW-Motech crashbars. Anybody done that?
If your strap angle is wide enough cross the straps, i.e. the strap around the left side going the the right tiedown point and vice-versa. That will keep the straps from fouling the fairing.
 

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If your strap angle is wide enough cross the straps, i.e. the strap around the left side going the the right tiedown point and vice-versa. That will keep the straps from fouling the fairing.
Doh!

Clever thinking - my aging engineering brain missed that solution - thanks!

Mike
 
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