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With all the new 5 year warranty greatness that comes with a lot of Suzuki's I came across a peculiarity the other day when I picked up my new 2018 vstrom 1000. I was mentioning I keep receipts and do my own service and oil changes and he mentioned the 1000km service needs to be done by a dealer to keep your 5 year warranty. I've never heard of this before and while the rest of the purchase was great and the dealer has been great otherwise, this just seemed like it was trying to drum up business. Especially when I found out it doesnt even require a valve check, so it's mostly oil change and checking fasteners etc.

I'm in Canada if that helps, but has anyone else been told first service is dealer required to keep the 5 year warranty? I like wrenching on my bikes as it helps me get to know them, and I'd like to avoid $120 an hour just to oil change and check fasteners.
 

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I agree that it sounds like a cash grab. Read your warranty documentation. Your rights and obligations will be clearly stated.
It would reflect poorly on Suzuki if it is there, and poorly on the dealer if it is not.
 

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Not sure if Consumer Protection Acts in Canada is equivalent to Moss-Magnuson Act in US but seem to recall a thread somewhere stating similar protections. It is illegal in US to void warranty for self-service but the consumer must provide written proof of supplies (oil, etc.) in order to show compliance with maintenance schedule.

Check with your Provincial government to assure compliance there and to prevent a dealership from spreading false information.
 
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The Consumer Protection Act in Canada is based on the Magnusson Moss Warranty Act in the US. Info here

They protect the consumer in event of warranty claim. The dealer has to prove that work done by the owner caused a warrantable failure. The law also states that a consumer can do the maintenance required to maintain the warranty. Keep records and receipts.
 

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Dealer never mentioned that to me.

I let them know I do most of my service, and they just said to make sure I have a record and receipts.
 

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when I pcked up my 2019 the dealer strongly recommended that I have them do the first service, didnt say had to, just strongly recommended. they said the first service is the most important and best to have it on record with suzuki. no talk of voiding the warranty.

I'm the same, have never taken my bike in for any service but decided this time to let them do it. this is my first bike with ABS, TC, etc and figured their techs know better what to look for than I do. it was painful but also gave a little peace of mind. it wont be going back for anything except warranty work, so hopefully never again.
 

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I don't care about warranty anymore, and do all services by myself. Too many time been screwed on warranty claim anyway.
 

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Not sure if Consumer Protection Acts in Canada is equivalent to Moss-Magnuson Act in US but seem to recall a thread somewhere stating similar protections. It is illegal in US to void warranty for self-service but the consumer must provide written proof of supplies (oil, etc.) in order to show compliance with maintenance schedule.

Check with your Provincial government to assure compliance there and to prevent a dealership from spreading false information.
Providing written proof of maintenance performed isn't a legal requirement under Moss-Magnusen. The act doesn't place any specifics on the consumer as to what actions he's compelled to to take regarding maintenance. It's a good idea to keep records of your own maintenance, but that's mainly to defeat a challenge to a warranty claim that a failure was due to lack of maintenance. They can't deny a warranty claim simply because you don't have any maintenance records.
 

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Providing written proof of maintenance performed isn't a legal requirement under Moss-Magnusen. The act doesn't place any specifics on the consumer as to what actions he's compelled to to take regarding maintenance. It's a good idea to keep records of your own maintenance, but that's mainly to defeat a challenge to a warranty claim that a failure was due to lack of maintenance. They can't deny a warranty claim simply because you don't have any maintenance records.
let's not argue about this, but simply stated, if your bike craps out under warranty and you cannot provide proof of service, the manufacturer will likely deny your warranty claim if they can ever remotely tie the failure to a lack of service EVEN IF SERVICE WAS ACTUALLY DONE. remember, we're talking about when you cannot prove you did the service.

under US law, the manufacturer must conform its vehicles to their warranties. however a lack of service type failure is a valid defense to warranty claim.
 

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Great input here on the Magnuson-Moss warranty act. CYA is the critical thing. Keep all receipts. Start a spreadsheet of service performed, date and mileage. It takes seconds.
M-M is a great law. But you have to have impeccable documentation if the fecal matter hits the air accelerator.
 

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let's not argue about this, but simply stated, if your bike craps out under warranty and you cannot provide proof of service, the manufacturer will likely deny your warranty claim if they can ever remotely tie the failure to a lack of service EVEN IF SERVICE WAS ACTUALLY DONE. remember, we're talking about when you cannot prove you did the service.

under US law, the manufacturer must conform its vehicles to their warranties. however a lack of service type failure is a valid defense to warranty claim.
No argument was offered, teevee, nor was I encouraging someone not to keep maintenance records. I said as much in my post. But there is a lot of misinformation on line about warranties, much of it perpetuated by dealers and service centers, and then repeated on line, and I posted what I did to counter the specific concept that the consumer must provide service records for a warranty claim. Must implies a legal responsibility, and the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act does not require an owner to keep records of self service, or any records for that matter. It doesn't require the owner follow any particular service schedule, and it doesn't require that the owner get his bike serviced at the dealership where he bought the bike. A manufacturer can't legally deny your warranty claim based solely on the fact that you don't have any maintenance records.

And yes, I agree, not keeping records of maintenance is a bad plan. I have records of everything I've done to my bike for the past almost five years, along with receipts of everything I've purchased for it. This is a typical page out of my maintenance log:



The bike is long out of warranty, but I maintain the records because it's good to have this sort of info available, especially if I want to see if something like a valve has tightened up since the last check, or how many miles I'm getting out of a specific brand of tire.
 

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Suzuki Canada suggested taking photos of the service procedure . I suggest having a dated newspaper in view if possible. I'm taking my 650 in for it's 1st inspection Friday. They are charging $180 USD for the checkup. Probably the last time they see it.
 

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It has now been claimed by more than one person here that the consumer has to proof that service was done when in fact the burden of proof is entirely on the manufacturer who would have to demonstrate that whatever was done or not done to the bike directly caused the failure. So don’t stress over it whether you still have a receipt for the oil you bought, just do your own service and write down what you did and when. Get an OEM service manual if you want to do more than regular maintenance. It is very gratifying to learn about your bike and to know what has been done to it.
 

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I was told the same by the dealer from which I bought my Wee. (2 weeks ago)
They are in Ottawa/Gatineau area, so I am tempted to assume it was probably the same...
The bike had the o-ring recall outstanding, the the dealership sucks for not doing it before handing over the bike, so I will do my first 1K maint and the recall at a dealer.
So far, loving the bike
 

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I don't feel the same level of distrust or annoyance at having a dealer do maintenance, or paying them to do so. They know more than I do, and having my mc and scoot serviced at the same dealer has not left me feeling ripped off. Of course, not all persons or businesses are responsible or equally fair. Tools and parts and land and reasonable wages all add up. Most operations and procedures are easy after doing it a few times; the first time for anything is often a lot less satisfying. The first service seems like a logical service for a dealer to do.

There are different levels of amateur ability; some are competent and knowledgable, and plenty are not as good as they think they are. I know I'm not, but I agree that there is satisfaction if I do get something done smoothly and conveniently.

RE recalls, I believe that in BC a new vehicle cannot be registered until all outstanding recalls are done. Which I think is a good regulation.
 

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I found this at the suzuki.ca site.

"Owners's Warranty Responsibilities
It is the responsibility of each owner to:
(a) ensure, at his/her own expense, that the Vehicle has the maintenance service inspections speci-
fied in the owner’s manual conducted by an authorized Suzuki Canada motorcycle and/or ATV
dealer and;
(b) maintain adequate proof that such service inspections have been conducted by retaining repair
order copies. Please request your authorized Suzuki Canada motorcycle and/or ATV dealer to update the “Vehicle Service Record” pages of this Warranty Booklet at the time each service inspection is performed."
 

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I have learned from experience that ALL types of ‘consumer protection’ agencies in Canada are mediocre at best. On paper there is a great deal of protection for the consumer but in actuality it is a hell-of-a-headache to get a dealer or vehicle manufacturer to respect warranties, unless they are the only people touching your vehicle.

With that said, there are some decent dealers out there that operate in an ‘ethical’ way and try to be helpful.
 

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Suzuki Canada appears to be out of line with the global community. This from the Suzuki Australia website FAQ:

"Q. Will my warranty be affected if the periodic service is done by a non – authorised repairer?
A. As warranty covers the unit for manufacturing defects only, ensuring your motorcycle is regularly maintained using approved lubricants and replacement parts will ensure that the coverage afforded by the manufacturer’s warranty is not affected. However please be aware that manufacturer’s warranty does not cover failures caused by faulty workmanship or the use of non-approved replacement parts or lubricants. We strongly recommend you use an authorised Suzuki dealer as they are factory trained, have the necessary special tools and access to up to date technical information."
 
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