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Damaged oil drain plug

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Please relieve my mind and tell me I am not screwed!!

I have a 2014 Suzuki VStrom 650 with an oil plug that’s really really tight. How it got so tight I don’t know since I did my last oil change and never tighten it that much. So unfortunately the bolt is now rounded off, lessened learned I guess.
Any thoughts or suggestions are welcomed on how to remove the bolt. To make matters worse I am not the brightest bulb on the tree. I have done oil changes with basic tools on it before but that’s it. I am no where near a mechanic .

I bought a damaged bolt and stud extractor tool 1/4 - 1/2 (6mm -12mm) but it doesn’t fit.

Please, no rude or mean comments. I feel stupid enough as it is. I also don’t want to pay a dealer if I can help it.

Thank you in advance for your assistance.
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@Hanz
Please don’t think I’m stalking your posts. You are not correct. A 6 point socket will take significantly more torque than a 12. Don’t believe, Google it.

None of our big sockets for bolt inspection at work are 12’s. We kept breaking them.

Half the push points on a 12 point socket are filled with air. The other half, have half the bearing surface of a 6 point.

edit - added a picture to explain my last paragraph.
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Since this is the case the 12 point socket gives you twice the "push points" to transfer torque.
Huh? That would only be the case on a 12 point bolt flange, not on a hex. On a hex, a 12 point socket pushes on a tiny portion of the flat, near the corners. A 6 point spreads the load on a larger area of the flat and has greater wall thickness for more of its circumference.

As for removing a stuck bolt, judicious use of high explosives will remove any bolt that's stuck in a hole.
 

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Jasbear joined to make his one and only post five days ago, came back 7 times over the next two days, made no more posts and was last here 4 days ago. I guess our initial advice worked.
Thanks buddy - you are very welcome.
Hey, it has been fun though.
 

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Huh? That would only be the case on a 12 point bolt flange, not on a hex. On a hex, a 12 point socket pushes on a tiny portion of the flat, near the corners. A 6 point spreads the load on a larger area of the flat and has greater wall thickness for more of its circumference.

As for removing a stuck bolt, judicious use of high explosives will remove any bolt that's stuck in a hole.
So sorry!~ My mind wandered off thinking about different fastener head designs used for applications where there was limited space.. Yes, on a six sided bolt/nut a six sided socket/wrench is clearly the best way to go. I agree 100% and I apologize for my mind "drift". What I was thinking about was when we have situations where space is tight for tools and we have need for high torque on a fastener. In those situations we often use a 12 point fastener head as it gives more grip area for the tool to work against. Here we can take full advantage of the added strengths of the 12 point system. Although the average home mechanic will likely seldom or ever see these types if they do they should know there are a couple of different varieties of these and they require a different tool.

One type is what is commonly known as a "Triple square". Triple square, also known as XZN, is a type of screw drive with 12 equally spaced tips, each with a 90 degree angle. Its name derives from overlaying 3 equal squares to form such a pattern with 12 right-angled tips. There are both "male" and "female" versions of this. I have a few special sockets for these. Examples were things like cylinder head bolts (12mm) and CV joint bollts (8mm). My 12 and 8 mm versions are well worn, my 10mm looks like new. The other common 12 point heads are just a six point design turned to make 12 even points, still maintaining the same 60 degree angle as a standard 6 point. For these you just use a "normal" 12 point socket or wrench. I mention this because people can confuse these and use the wrong tool and round these off. There are just too many different head designs out there that cause mechanics and technicians to spend a lot of money at Snap-On tools and other specialty tool companies. Same goes for screw heads. Many don't realize there are Phillips, Pozi-Drive and Reed and Prince designs, and think the same tool will work in all. Again, an error that can strip out a fastener head.

So, sorry for making confusing statements. ST Corndog was quick to catch this too and I will just have to avoid writing comments at night when my brain is half asleep! Sorry guys! :D
 
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