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Damaged oil drain plug

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Please relieve my mind and tell me I am not screwed!!

I have a 2014 Suzuki VStrom 650 with an oil plug that’s really really tight. How it got so tight I don’t know since I did my last oil change and never tighten it that much. So unfortunately the bolt is now rounded off, lessened learned I guess.
Any thoughts or suggestions are welcomed on how to remove the bolt. To make matters worse I am not the brightest bulb on the tree. I have done oil changes with basic tools on it before but that’s it. I am no where near a mechanic .

I bought a damaged bolt and stud extractor tool 1/4 - 1/2 (6mm -12mm) but it doesn’t fit.

Please, no rude or mean comments. I feel stupid enough as it is. I also don’t want to pay a dealer if I can help it.

Thank you in advance for your assistance.
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As has been stated a few times

LEFTY LOOSY.


And make sure you adjust for the fact that the bolt is inverted and screwed UP into the case. (so lay on your back on the ground and "look up" at the bolt to orient yourself and make sure you are indeed turning LEFT)


Had a buddy about 30 years ago we were changing the oil on our bikes, he was grumbling how tight the drain bolt was, then I heard a "crack!" and he says "ahhh, I got it".

About that time old started draining/leaking from under his bike. After still not being able to remove the bolt he asked me to look - he had been TIGHTENING the bolt, and he literally cracked the case on his bike.

Was an expensive repair and his bike was out of commission for awhile.
 

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The best place to start is with tradesman quality tools, department store tools will find their limitations much earlier.

Technique will play a big part but but good quality tools can help overcome poor Technique where as poor quality tools will exaggerate the problem.

In 1994 I purchased a new 115hp out board motor, in 2000 I had to remove the head covers to replace the swollen gaskets that were causing restrictions in the cooling water flow.

The local specialist was a friend of my dad and he recommended I just dump the motor as the damage I would cause trying to get the old bolts out would make the motor worthless anyway.

With the right tools, lots of patience and good technique every bolt undone without a problem saving me the cost of a new motor
 

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If using a torque wrench on the drain plug it must be an in/lb wrench as the torque spec is 15 ft/lbs and no ft/lb torque wrench can do that accurately (and they are long, with plenty of leverage). Done correctly, the new crush washer is barely crushed.
With a new crush washer and no torque wrench, when you feel the crush washer crush, it is then most likely torqued to specification.
 

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If using a torque wrench on the drain plug it must be an in/lb wrench as the torque spec is 15 ft/lbs and no ft/lb torque wrench can do that accurately (and they are long, with plenty of leverage). Done correctly, the new crush washer is barely crushed.
With a new crush washer and no torque wrench, when you feel the crush washer crush, it is then most likely torqued to specification.
Why won’t a ft/lb torque wrench torque to 15 ft/lbs accurately?
 

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Also since there is always some oil in the crankcase threads, shouldn't the torque for the "oiled drain plug" be much less then the Suzuki suggested torque?

Googled:
So, torque isn't the true measure of bolt tightness—it's tension. But lubrication on the bolt threads—and a whole host of other factors—can cause fluctuation in torque readings. So once you add a lubricant of any kind to the threads, all bets are off as to whether the same torque setting will truly secure the bolt.
 
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Why won’t a ft/lb torque wrench torque to 15 ft/lbs accurately?
It's just general good advice to use an in/lb wrench when you get that low. A big wrench is out of the sweet spot for accuracy. If you have high quality tools, it doesn't matter as much. I have Harbor Freight junk, so it's a must. Most of the time for low torque values, the human body, some experience and a box wrench will get you where you want to be.
 

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Why won’t a ft/lb torque wrench torque to 15 ft/lbs accurately?
It's just general good advice to use an in/lb wrench when you get that low. A big wrench is out of the sweet spot for accuracy. If you have high quality tools, it doesn't matter as much. I have Harbor Freight junk, so it's a must. Most of the time for low torque values, the human body, some experience and a box wrench will get you where you want to be.
Personally, even with high quality shop tools (mine are mid-level) I stay within the middle third of my torque wrench range. It takes an in-lb and two foot-pound wrenches to work on bikes. If you are gonna get a cheap torque wrench, I recommend the upper range one. As you get lower torque, spend more money on your wrench.
 

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If you are gonna get a cheap torque wrench, I recommend the upper range one. As you get lower torque, spend more money on your wrench.
Agree
I would never use a torque wrench on a crush washer. With a standard 12-pt wrench, while turning, you can feel the washer crushing, and then all of the sudden it becomes harder to turn. You are now done.
 

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Pic of the wrench?

I just ordered this set (I know it's not quite what you are talking about). I survived on my HF set until I got my Strom. $48.48 with points and discount. Getting ready for the spark plug and valve clearance tasks.

I treat copper and aluminum a little differently, but no torque wrench. I turn until I meet the washer and then go another turn or so. No leaking from last oil change.
 

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We haven’t heard, from the OP, but I will comment that I have the same bike (2014 Wee2), and that the oil-drain bolt is about the most unlikely bolt, IMHO, to expect to have trouble with. I’ve never measured, but memory says it has about 1 inch of nice, clean, well-made threads. Again, I’ve never looked, but I’d expect similar thread length, in the engine casting.

On my bike, that bolt threads in very smoothly, and easily, via fingers. Need to wrench-tighten, of course. Point, I guess, I’d that the parts are well made, and that applying enough torque, to strip threads, as some have mentioned, seems, to me, darned unlikely.
 
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So, has buddy got that drain plug out yet?
Today is the sabbath and I urge Stromtroopers to attend evening vespers and pray for the lad. Cracking the case is the work of the devil.

I thought about skipping the washer entirely and just applying thread sealant or tape to that bolt, since as mentioned above, it's long. Bet a dab of Hylomar would get it also. Hylomar is a gift from god.
 

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The crush washer is important. Thread tape is NOT something I would put on that particular bolt. For pipe threads sealing tape is OK, but those threads are tapered and sort of jam themselves together to make a seal. Taper pipe fittings are normally made of softer metals like brass or "black iron" pipes. These metals have a bit of "give" to them that helps them seal. That drain plug is steel and much more rigid. Rather than making the aluminum of the case "give" to make a seal the soft crush washer deforms to seal the parts together. As for reusing the old crush washer...that is a "maybe" thing. I have reused them before by flipping them over but I do this only once and only when I just don't have a new one. There is a reason: Work hardening, more properly called strain hardening, occurs when a material is plastically deformed, i.e., when stresses beyond the yield strength cause dislocation motion. This strain hardening is common on parts like aluminum sprockets which can, when make with the right alloys, last longer than steel sprockets. (Only on the rear where the contact area is greater.).
As for torguing a drain plug, not really needed. Use a good crush washer and learn the "feel" of it deforming. Now, when a torque wrench is required....I have six of them, different drive sizes including one very high dollar Snap-On electronic one that is extremely accurate and reserved for those times when you absolutely, positively, get it done right. Use the right tool for the job.
 
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