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Discussion Starter #1
I've seen some older posts relating to cutting the fork springs. How have these held up over the long term? I am confused on how much to cut off and what size spacer to use.
 

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While I did not do this to my Vstrom, many years ago I did it on my Kawasaki Concours 1000. I had mounted a sidecar on the bike, and had a custom shock built by Works Performance. In a phone call with one of their suspension engineers, he recommended it as a good method. I already had Progressive brand springs installed - forget exactly how much I cut off, but then made a new spacer longer than stock by the length I had cut off. I put 50,000 miles on the bike with sidecar after that with no issues.
 

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Good experience here too

You have probably already decided if you want to try it or not, but I've also had good experience with cutting the front fork springs on a prior bike, as recommended to me by a Fox engineer. I'm a pretty low mileage commuter, so not lots of miles, but they worked good for 5 plus years. There's a formula for how long the springs should be for a desired spring rate, as well as a website where you could enter the info.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
You have probably already decided if you want to try it or not, but I've also had good experience with cutting the front fork springs on a prior bike, as recommended to me by a Fox engineer. I'm a pretty low mileage commuter, so not lots of miles, but they worked good for 5 plus years. There's a formula for how long the springs should be for a desired spring rate, as well as a website where you could enter the info.
Yes! I cut them down a couple weeks ago and the difference while sitting in the garage is very noticeable. If the snow ever melts I will get to ride it again :)

I decided to just do a "quick" upgrade for now. I took the springs out the top, sucked out as much oil as I could then put the same amount back in and put the cut springs in.

If my forks ever start leaking I'll likely replace them with racetech springs and do a full overhaul on the forks at that time. This was just a quick fix for now.
 

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If my forks ever start leaking I'll likely replace them with racetech springs and do a full overhaul on the forks at that time. This was just a quick fix for now.
If your forks start leaking go buy a Sealmate and that will almost certainly fix your leak with almost no cost or effort. It worked perfectly on my 2012 DL650 at around 110,000 km/ 68,00 miles.

Fix Leaking Fork Seals With | SealMate.net

..Tom
 

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I thought I'd add my 2cents. After much searching for DIY (cheep) improvements this thread was the best information I could find. So I tried it.

First I swapped the rear shock for a used DL1000 shock. Then I cut the fork springs and put them in with 15w fork oil. The improvement is very noticeable. Where any kind of slight washboard bumps would make the wee's suspension stack up and become unusable before it sails over it now in good control. Where I always had to slow way down on dirt/gravel roads for fear of coming upon a wash out too fast I can speed up knowing the suspension will take the hit and allow me to control the bike.

NICE

Now I'm wondering what a real suspension upgrade would do for me? Probably another time as much better of more. But I'm happy for now.
 

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If your forks start leaking go buy a Sealmate and that will almost certainly fix your leak with almost no cost or effort. It worked perfectly on my 2012 DL650 at around 110,000 km/ 68,00 miles.

Fix Leaking Fork Seals With | SealMate.net

..Tom
unless you wait too long to use the seal mate. Mine was too far gone by the time I got one. Now I have fork boots and a Seal Mate waiting in the tool box!
 
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