StromTrooper banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
234 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I recently got a new GS Adv and while the seat is one of the better ones that I've scene on a stock bike, I'm looking forward to getting off of it after only 100ish miles. I've used Russell Day Long saddles on my previous bikes and have been happy with the product for the most part. The big downside is I either have to mail in my seat and be without it for a few weeks, or I need to make a run to Redding, CA to do a ride in. Neither were convenient for me right now, so I thought I would try a local builder. I had rumours about "the guy in Albany." I did some digging and found out the guy was Don Weber of Mr. Ed's Moto.

I gave him a call last week and while he is booked out quite a ways he had slot yesterday so I snagged it. We talked a bit on the phone about what I wanted, he asked that I show up about nine on the day of my appointment.

I arrived at nine, he opened the rolling door and I rode into his shop. He quickly got a side view of me on the bike before I even turned it off. Once I hopped off the bike he introduced himself, welcomed me, and said to make myself at home. He pointed me at the restroom, gear closet, etc., offered coffee, and said to let him know if there was anything I needed throughout or day.

I pulled off my gear and when I turned around the bike was on the workstand, side cases off, and he was pulling the seat off. The OEM cover was quickly removed and put back on the bike. He had me hop on and do various things, sit, stand, feet on pegs, feet on floor. He was marking the seat as this went on.

Here is the OEM seat on the bike without the cover:



And here it is marked up with some of the factory foam removed:



More cutting, marking, and slicing:



There was a ruler, a level, the knife, the seat and Don. It was fun to watch him work. While all this is happening we were shooting the bull. He'd sneak in a question about what sort of riding I did, how much I weighed, any hip, knee, or health options, etc. He got what he needed, and I didn't feel like I had been interrogated.

After the cutting, he started building up with various foam densities. Here's an intermediate shot. All of the layers are glued together with contact cement dispensed via a compressed air gun. Don has a great outlook and is a happy guy, he attributed some of that his working environment.



After many layers, it's back on the bike with me running through various fit scenarios with Don watching and gathering info.



Then some more layering:



And more layering with other densities:



Here's Don applying the magic glue:



After all the layering, it's time for some shaping. The tool here is an air driven grinder. Note the center reference line on the seat.



I enjoy watching craftsman apply their trade. This was no different. Don would look, grind, feel, grind, measure, grind. There was a careful intent in his work, it was fun to watch.



After shaping to his satisfaction Don put the bike on the seat, tossed a piece of vinyl over it , and sent me on a 20 mile test route. When I got back he asked for input on how it felt. I was very pleased with the shape and feel, but I did feel a sharp edge on the front of the seat under my right thigh. Don asked if it was just my right, I confirmed. The seat came off, he took cut of material out of the right side as shown, and send me for another short ride. Here is the seat with the fresh cut prior to gluing it back together:



I got back from my ride and gave him the thumbs up. He covered the entire seat with some blue material designed to keep the cover from destroying the foam underneath it. A base layer if you will, put it back on the bike, and had me run through the various positions one more time.



Once that was done he offered me various colors of materials, talked a bit about where the seems would lie, and then started cutting the cover material. He suggested a seam pattern that flowed with the lines on the thank of the bike. It turned out great. The material I chose was basic black, with a texture similar to the stock GS seat. Here are the cut pieces.



Then it was on to the sewing machine to put them together.



Finally, the completed cover was put on the seat and attached via staples while carefully being placed.



Yes, that's an air stapler. Throughout the day the compressor cycled as the air drove the tools.

With that done, the seat went on the bike, Don snapped a picture of me, and I snapped one of him with the finished product.



It's very clear that Don is proud of what he does, happy to share the experience with the customer, and enjoyed answering questions even after learning I was an engineer.

He said he doesn't consider this work and I believe it. He truly enjoys the activity and it shows. He's also an international traveller and rider, and has a lot to share.

Ok, back to the seat. I hopped on and headed out, taking the scenic route home, about 120 miles. Maybe twenty miles in I started getting discomfort in my left thigh, very much like the test ride discomfort I had experienced in my right thigh. I'm not sure why I had not felt it earlier. It didn't get any better as the ride continued. :-(

I called Don this morning, described the problem, he immediately suggested we do the same thing to the left side that had been done to the right. He asked if I was available this afternoon to bring it in. So, in about an hour I'm heading back down to have him make that fix, and I suspect it will be perfect.

The support and comfort outside of the issue just described is great. I'm really looking forward to a 500 mile day to see how it holds up, and am very optimistic. I'll be back with the longer term report then.

:thumbup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,437 Posts
Sounds like a great seat in the making.

How much $? Did he offer a way to rain-seal the seams?

Rich's Custom Seats near Seattle starts at $425 for rider only with a custom seat and new basic cover. Well worth it for everyone I've spoken with. I'll try monkeying with my seat, and probably end up at Rich's.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
29 Posts
Last October, I took my DL1K to Mr. Ed's Moto, so Don could build me a seat. The stock seat hurt after 30 min and I was in serious pain by 40 min. I sit back far on the seat and my butt was pressing hard against the pillion uprise.

This was no problem for Don. He pulled the foam off of the pan, cut the plastic and used the heat gun shown in the above post to heat up the plastic so it could be pressed down to a more shallow angle. Then he placed four screws into it to hold it firm.

The foam went back on and the cutting began. My seat then followed the same process as the above post.

He is willing to adjust the seat, but asks that you at least ride with it 1,000 miles first. Sounds fair to me.

Cost: $450 Don's work is impeccable. He sewed my seat cover to line up with the lines of the bike as well. He is well thought of by the dual sport crowd. While I was there two BMW F650s showed up.

BTW in case you are wondering as was I, why Don Weber named his shop Mr. Ed's Moto. He said, "Well, I had to name it something."

While you wait you can shop on the other side of his shop. His wife runs a retail gear store where the RevIt brand is prominent as well as Oxtar boots (I forgot their new name). For people in the Portland area this nice because until a few months ago, no one in Portland carried RevIt gear.

Last note on Don. He installs fuse blocks, Stebel horns, tires etc if you let him know. He is not just a seat man. But he does a great job on seats.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
234 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Sounds like a great seat in the making.

How much $? Did he offer a way to rain-seal the seams?
$450 for the rider only. He sealed the seams on mine after he stitched it together, I assume that is standard practice.

I went back this afternoon and he fixed the problem I had on the left side. Only took about 45 minutes, he pulled the cover, made the fix, had me test sit, and then put it all back together. No issues on the way home.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
seat work

After seeing this thread I got to work cutting and gluing foam. I feels great ,but no test ride yet.
[/IMG]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,012 Posts
Don has a well deserved reputation. A guy I ride with out of Portland is rather large at 350 lbs or so. Don fixed him up without any issues and I was impressed looking at his workmanship.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
765 Posts
Don is a craftsman. He did the finishing touches to a build up seat I modified last year. He good all around. I will use him again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Just had Mr Ed Moto make a new seat for my 2019 vstrom. One should contact them before going any other direction. Corbin, Sargent etc.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top