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Discussion Starter #1
Hello to all Stromtroopers

My custom made lowering links just arrived.
They are cut with water jet cutter, the wholes are CNC machined.
The material is stainless steel (EN: 1 4301 or ASTM: 304, JIS: SUS 304).

I know stainless steels are not so strong than compound steels.
My question: what do you think, has that part the approriate strength for use as a link?
Or
What are the maximal loads on the links while in use?
 

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stainless steel is not only harder but also has a higher tensile strength than regular carbon/cold rolled steels. Almost all of the loads will be in tension for this part.

304 is the most common Stainless steel.

I made mine out of SS too. From the looks I even went with a shade thinner material.

They will be just fine.
 

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WIsixfitty said:
stainless steel is not only harder but also has a higher tensile strength than regular carbon/cold rolled steels. Almost all of the loads will be in tension for this part.

304 is the most common Stainless steel.

I made mine out of SS too. From the looks I even went with a shade thinner material.

They will be just fine.
As someone who deals with all kinds of stainless steel, every day, I couldn't agree more with WIsixfitty, except... A very high carbon steel will be "harder" but typical Stainless is much tougher..
That link, made of 304 SS will outlast the bike, several times over..

If it were mine, I'd polish it up to give it a good shine and slap it in, and forget about it forever.. It's got a mill finish, so I'd hit it with a 80 grit sanding disk, and then the highest grit thing you can find, or Scotchbrite to put a shine on it.. Just remember never to grind or polish with something that's been used on mild steel.. Always use a new disk, or you'll impregnate mild steel into it and cause it to rust..

There, now you know more about your link than you'll ever need.. :lol:
 

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I remember drilling my own brake discs back before they came that way. I sometimes think I spent as much time sharpening drill bits as I did drilling holes. SS is tough stuff.
 

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greywolf said:
I remember drilling my own brake discs back before they came that way. I sometimes think I spent as much time sharpening drill bits as I did drilling holes. SS is tough stuff.
The problem with SS is that unless you have a sharp drill, and go at it like it life or death that you have the hole, the SS work hardens ahead of the bit.. Lots of lube and a sharp bit are the key..

I'm usually working with 316 and 317, and occasionally Hasteloy.. They make 304 seem like a dream to drill.. :shock:

I'll be those discs were REALLY work hardened before you even started on them.. That's tough drilling!! :lol:
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thank you guys for your kind help!

I also planned to make it shiny, moreover even to engrave something like "Stromtrooper" or "Karalink" (my family name is Karakas) or the V-Strom logo or...
Would it be too extreme or cheesy?

I will install them tomorrow, took some shots and will post a report.
There come something to my mind which makes unnecessary to have a helper/supporter while installation. Will see if works.
 

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Karalink sounds good to me. You are proud of your family name so why not ? It would look cool and you might start making Karalinks for other Strom riders too. Like they say " It Pays To Advertise ". Could be a money making hobby. You could buy more Farkles .
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Hello Stromfellows,

I finished with the installation of my custom made lowering links.
Normally the whole process shouldn't take more than about 20 minutes.
Mine took 3 hours due to documentation... ...and some grinding... ...smoking... ...and polishing... ...drinking... ...wrenching... ...enjoying... 8)

After the installation the seat height is lower by 15-20 mm. Unfortunately I still cannot flat foot.:evil: although the front forks are already raised by 15 mm. So the next (longer) link is under calculation.

Impressions after 50 Km twisty test ride:
The bike behaves noticeably more stable in curves but on the other hand turns less easy. It is simply amazing how big is the impact of such a small mod! After the front fork raise I felt the same huge (positive) change in the curving.
Ohh not to forget: pegs are still not in danger...:wink:

The complete story can be seen here with bilingual explanation, just click on a thumbnail:
http://www.freeweb.hu/dl650/fotoalbum/DL 650 V-Strom/link_installation/index.html

Here is a few pics to key you up:

Measuring initial seat height:


Grinding and polishing:


Shiny isn't it?
 

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Very nice looking links. We have a craftsman in our midst. After you have made another set for further lowering you will have two sets of dimensions and their results. This should help others of short stature who are considering lowering their bike. Mod On.
 

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Lowering the V-strom

I talked to a fellow who does custome suspension work in Los Angeles. He said he could lower both the front and rear so that the handling would not change. He said he would revalve the rear shock and put new springs and bushing in the front forks. Anybody had any experience with this procedure?
 

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Discussion Starter #12
RoyalStromdad said:
15 - 20 mm is about .6 to .8 inches but it looks like it lowered it more than an inch in the photos if you look on the link.
It actually isn't.
I have measured somewhere between 815 and 820 mm for initial seat height.
After the installation the height was 800 mm.

Sitting on the bike I feel also it is not more than 20 mm.

With that lowering the side stand still usable, but only on horizontal ground.
The use of the center stand is not limited at all.
 

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lowering suspension internally

Fast Freddie, I'm involved with the AMA flattrack series, and most of the racers in the "singles" series are running converted motocross bikes. All are lowered internally. Some off-road riders have done this also. the flattrack boys usually cut out about half the travel - from 12 to 6 inches. Off road guys usually have both ends lowered about 1 1/2 inches. With this method you can have it set wherever you like. It's more expensive to have done tho, and costs just as much to change it again. Probably $150-200 per end. It's probably the best way to lower the bike with minimal change in handling. changing the link also changes the ratio and leverage on the shock. Raising the fork doesn't. So....even tho both ends are lowered, the ratios aren't.
 
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