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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
This post has been a long time coming. I wanted to share my work and thoughts around the design of my pannier mounts. This all began on a weekend when I was supposed to take a bike trip and it was pouring and 40. So my friend and I set off building these mounts.
The mounts were going to flat to accommodate ammo can but also allow in the future pelicans or other boxes (when of course the wife allows me to buy stuff again). I went with 1" steel square tubing. My father is a machinist as well as my welder owning friend. He made a really cool die to bend square tubing without kinking it. This went into a cheapo harbor freight tubing bender. All bends seen were done with this bender. One concern was water entering the framework. This required that all tubes be sealed. There is only two sets of holes in the framework. I am going to put orings on the bolt heads.
The next thing was mounting points. I did a ton of research on how other companies and DIY folks have done it. I wanted it to be really strong and look clean. This meant no drilling holes that weren't there and hide as much hardware as possible. I have a Givi trunk so that helped hide the top mounting bolts. I went with using the rear luggage rack bolts and the holes on the foot pegs. The rear would be stiffened with a cross bar. I didn't like the options for mounting to the grab bars and the foot pegs seemed like it would make a stronger frame. This idea was also blatantly stolen from other Stromtroopers.
We went about fabing the first side and realized that the foot pegs on the right side are almost 2" wider out than the left. This required a bit of complex bends to compensate for this but it worked.
I spent more time and beer drinking time contemplating what to do about mounting the non exhaust side. I personally think the asymmetry of the swmotech and givi racks looks terrible. I went with keeping both sides as close to the same width as possible and building a tool tube to fill the void. Overall the entire width is 34". The handle bars I think are 33", not bad.
The mount to the luggage rack bolts were a trick. There is alot of screwy angles to jog around but in the end we had two parts that worked. A person good at CNC machining and CAD could draw these up and make them much more quickly than we did. Those two mounts were almost five hours of work. Four for the first one and one for the second. The blocks were tapped to accept the mounting screw. (My two breaks in the tube frame was for these bolts)
The bar around the back was bent using a huge tubing die and a lot of guessing.
With that welded in the frame was done. See photo of it on the floor.
Oh ya and there was the tool tube. It was made using flat stock from home depot. 1"X .125" rolled using muscle, elbow grease and pure determination around various bits of round stock. There is way better tools to do this but I don't own them. The clamps were welded to stand offs made of left over square stock and welded to the frame (the exact position was discussed at length over many beers).
The tube was also turned in a lathe to remove all the silly stubs so it looks a bit cleaner.
The boxes are 60mm mortar cans. They are not as big as the 20mm or 40mm cans used by others but they great for what I need to supplement my trunk. The frame was painted with POR-15 and the boxes with rustolium. I of course ran the can into a lawn chair and scratched the whole side my first ride out but that is what these are for.
The cans were mounted using a length of angle welded to the box for the bottom mounting point and using 2 1/4-20 studs on the top. The outside of the top box has hard rubber strips to act as a lock washer and vibration damping. The inside I needed a solid 1/2x.1/4 strip. When the cans were welded they oil canned into a banana. The metal strip keeps then straight and lets the lid shut again. I plan on getting some acorn nuts but the wing nuts work for now. Truck cap tape was put on two of the faces on the bottom angles to stop it from rattling.

I know this was long but I really spent a long time figuring this out and was hoping to find a post like this so I decided to write it.
Thanks for reading.
Scott

Check out photos below. :thumbup:
 

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What fun to have the gear to undertake this kind of construction.
Nice to see inventive. Better than some who only want specific experience.
Kudos to you!
 

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Nice work

Wow those really look good. What type/size of ammo cans did you use? The tool tube was a good add in also.
 

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Jig

Would you mind sharing a photo or three of the bending attachment?





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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
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Not wanting to make this a buffeting/ windshield thread but....
The wind shield is from Cal Sci. I'm about 6' tall and the shield is a tall. Works great. Makes the bike a bit less sporty looking but if I wanted looks I wouuld have kept my ZX6R. I works awesome though. I used to ride everywhere getting the crap beaten out of me and now I use my half helmet most of the time.

I will get some photos of the tubing die.

Making dies and rollers to bend square tubing

THis link is one that some of the ideas came from. My friends die is much nicer made. The general idea is you need the round stock to apply force on the inside of the tube to take up some of the material that has to compress on the inside of the bend. Typically without this setup you just get kinks.
Other folks fill the tube with sand and make the bends.
This is less messy.
 
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