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Discussion Starter #1
I'll be crossing the border from VT en route to Montreal and going back same day last part of July. Any recommendations for this border crossing shindig? Can I simply turn my V1 (radar) off or should I take it off the bike completely? Do they inspect the bike or just want to inspect my ID? Any suggestions or recommendations greatly appreciated.

Stromette
 

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I'd remove the radar and hide it away. If you have a passport give that to them first, birth certificate if you don't and have your drivers licence ready as well.

As for inspections they can flag you for anything, I had the dogs through my car at Detroit because I gave the border guard a smart-assed answer to a really dumb question. Be polite and you'll be on your way with no hassles.
 

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The Shepherd said:
I'd remove the radar and hide it away. If you have a passport give that to them first, birth certificate if you don't and have your drivers licence ready as well.

As for inspections they can flag you for anything, I had the dogs through my car at Detroit because I gave the border guard a smart-assed answer to a really dumb question. Be polite and you'll be on your way with no hassles.
Good advice from The Shepherd there.

The border inspectors here in the GWN generally are looking for three things:

1) undeclared goods being imported (i.e. left in Canada) that they can charge a tax, and possibly, a duty on

2) Illicit drugs

3) Firearms

The best advice I can add is to volunteer no information that is not asked for first and keep answers as simple, direct and truthful as possible. If they ask for the dollar value of anything being imported (if any) just assume they mean the U.S. dollar value. That will present a lower amount and they don't bother collecting taxes here unless the dollar value is above about $50 or they're bored stiff so the lower the better.

Since Stromette is a U.S. resident (although it's hard to guess exactly where of, at any given time :D) the border guard will almost certainly ask if she's packing firearms. This is one question where it's most important to be truthful as they will get quite excited if they search and find an undeclared weapon. It happens at our border station a few times a year and it's usually someone from the Southern states that gets busted. A stiffish fine and forfeiture of said firearm is usually the end of it but I recall one poor sap got thrown into the slammer for a few days in one case where the judge was looking to make a point, I guess. Some firearms, like hunting rifles may be brought in relatively easily with the proper paperwork but the border guards are very alert for U.S. citizens, especially from the Deep South, trying to sneak guns in so don't even think about it.

Anyway, as long as Strommette doesn't get sassy :D with the inspector she should be OK. Let us know how it goes.

- Martin
 

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Highway traffic act of Ontario.

Speed measuring warning device prohibited

(2) No person shall drive on a highway a motor vehicle that is equipped with or that carries or contains a speed measuring warning device. 1996, c. 33, s. 12.

http://www.e-laws.gov.on.ca/DBLaws/Statutes/English/90h08_e.htm

This is the link to the ENTIRE Highway traffic Act of Ontario. The Province of Quebec has similar rules btw.

Just trying to be helpful and friendly!

V. (Big bad mean LEO that I am)
:twisted:

:D
 

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This is more complete.

Speed measuring warning device prohibited

(2) No person shall drive on a highway a motor vehicle that is equipped with or that carries or contains a speed measuring warning device. 1996, c. 33, s. 12.

Powers of police officer

(3) A police officer may at any time, without a warrant, stop, enter and search a motor vehicle that he or she has reasonable grounds to believe is equipped with or carries or contains a speed measuring warning device contrary to subsection (2) and may seize and take away any speed measuring warning device found in or upon the motor vehicle. 1996, c. 33, s. 12.


Forfeiture of device

(4) Where a person is convicted of an offence under this section, any device seized under subsection (3) by means of which the offence was committed is forfeited to the Crown. R.S.O. 1990, c. H.8, s. 79 (4).

Penalty

(5) Every person who contravenes subsection (2) is guilty of an offence and on conviction is liable to a fine of not less than $100 and not more than $1,000. R.S.O. 1990, c. H.8, s. 79 (5).

Exception

(6) Subsection (2) does not apply to a person who is transporting speed measuring warning devices in sealed packages in a motor vehicle from a manufacturer to a consignee. 1996, c. 33, s. 12
 

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And just to make sure

Hope this helps.

Btw, Border guards are Federal Peace Officers, and therefore have powers to arrest, seize and detain. They can enforce the HTA as well.

But smile and be polite and you will be fine. Take your helmet off, they like to see your face. Only one bike at the wicket at a time, make sure your partner stays behind and waits for you to be done. Have your licence, Birth Certificate handy and turn the bike off so that he/she can hear you.

Enjoy Montreal. Try a restaurant called "La Belle Province" and order a "poutine"! You'll be impressed!

Cheers

V.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Will a COPY of birth certificate suffice or must it be the original?
 

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Border.

A copy is perfectly acceptable.

The requirement of the birth certificate is a concept that originated in the U.S.
The U.S. Government is currently tabling laws that will require all persons entering the U.S. from Canada, including U.S. citizens returning to their own country from Canada to produce a passport or a "special I.D." card with biometric information. This requirement is currently slated to come into effect in 2008.

We, in Canada, are much more lenient towards visitors crossing our land borders.

Air traffic is another matter entirely.

Have fun!


V.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Re: Border.

Vordak said:
A copy is perfectly acceptable.

Ok, surely w/a US passport (though expired 6mo ago), an Driver's License & a copy of my Birth Certificate I can get across the dang line! :roll: I think I'll just put the V1 in my Givi bag inside my laptop case. If things are bad enough that they search my Givi bag and laptop case and confiscate a radar that is not being used then the loss of a radar will be considered the least of my worries at that point. :wink:

Thanks for the help.

Stromette
 

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I've crossed the border a few times on my bike. American customs is harder on Canadians than the other way around. No need to remove the helmet, do take off sunglasses, have your I.D. handy (they really do prefer a passport) and they like it if you shut off the bike when you are stopped so you can hear one another.

Don't worry about it, they won't hassle you. Just make sure you don't have any firearms and it'll be a breeze.
 

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da border

well heavy sorry to contredict you but I went across the Vt-Qc border twice since May and both time going in and coming back I had to remove my helmet and even my clip-on so they could compare my pretty blue eyes to my completely ugly looking photo in my passport(B/W by the way)
 

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Wow, you must look scary or something. :wink:

They didn't hassle me at all.

We crossed over at Fort Erie just a few weeks ago and it was a breeze. My wife and I, no helmets off, just a few questions and we were on our way. (shrug)
 

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Border etiquette

I cross the US - Canada border a lot, because I live in Florida and have kin in Toronto and in Vancouver. Here are the guidelines that serve me well.

First, be an old fart. This is easy for me, because I have been rehearsing the role for years. The youngsters they put at the border know in their guts that they are so much smarter than I am that I would never dare to outsmart them.

Second, know beforehand that you are going to be asked most of these:

Where do you live? Reply with your town and state or province, no more.

Where were you born? Same thing. Name the hospital and you are asking for more delay and hassle than you need.

Where are you going? Town and province or state are the proper reply.

Why are you visiting (our country)? Be ready with a believable answer, such as touring, visiting family, shopping, or fishing. Do not mention anything about taking a course of study, looking for work, or anything connected with employment. You may need lots of complicated visas that you do not have.

How long will you be in (our country)? Be ready for this one, and don't fumble for the answer. Two weeks, ten days, whatever, make your answer brief and bland, expressing no doubt about your plans at all.

What are you importing? Mention anything costly (over $20 or so) that you will be leaving in the country you are visiting. Mention it's a gift for your host or your cousin or whatever it is. Decide beforehand how honest to be on this subject, and again express no doubt in your answers.

Third, no hat, no sunglasses, and wear the seatbelt. On two wheels, stop the engine, take off the helmet, take off the glasses, and SMILE.

Third, keep smiling, and give bland and brief answers to all the guard's questions. The duller your answers, the fewer the guard will want to hear. Do nothing to become memorable, lest you make the occasion memorable for you, in ways that are not entertaining at all.

On one recent crossing, from Sarnia ON to Port Huron MI on the V-Strom, I was told that the computer had selected my vehicle for a thorough inspection, so would I please park over there, turn off the engine, put it on the stand, and wait five minutes in the waiting room. I was in no hurry, but if I HAD been in a hurry, I could only have lengthened my wait by objecting or complaining. I parked, scrammed, and waited. The bike was piled high with tent, sleeping bag, suitcase, cargo box, knapsack, satchel, and cooler (no saddlebags - I'm too cheap). They disturbed nothing during the inspection, just waved a variety of sensors near the bike and around the cargo. They kept their word and sent me on my way in five minutes, having opened nothing. Welcome to Michigan, indeed.

If I have a choice of crossing points, I prefer the Blue Water Bridge (Sarnia/Port Huron) to the Ambassador (Detroit/Windsor). I like the Peace Bridge enough that I don't cross the Niagara River anywhere else. I like the Ivy Lea Bridge in the 1000 Islands, and I know nothing about crossing points east of there.

When I rode north from Omak WA to Osoyoos British Columbia, I encountered a new question:

Why did you pick THIS crossing point?

I said that I planned my route from Coeur D'Alene ID to Vancouver BC based on the hope, well fulfilled, of finding lovely scenery, and this was where I happened to cross the 49th parallel. I didn't say that Osoyoos was my opinion of a hick town where a sophisticated smuggler like me could fool the local rubes in uniform, but I thought it. And smiled.

Whether the smile helped, I can't say, but the guard let me enter Canada, after studying my Florida license plate a while. Canada allows you to bring in one bottle of rum, but I was packin' two. Yum.

Oh. One thing that sometimes matters, and sometimes doesn't. Generally do not bring citrus fruit from Canada into the USA. Also, do not try to bring beef-based dog food into the USA. Not a lot of us take dogs on our V-Stroms, but ya never know.

Apples and lamb and chicken, OK. There is apparently no mad sheep scare nowadays, but again ya never know.

So be aware, try to reach the border in daylight and at a time when you are not tired and cranky, and above all, SMILE!

Keith always gets through!
 
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