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Discussion Starter #1
If this little farkle has already been discussed here, sorry for the repeat but it is great. It is a little plastic piece that slips over your grip on one end with no tools. It costs $11 bucks. You rest your palm on it, allowing you to maintain throttle position while relaxing your grip, preventing cramps. I have used it for 2 days now on my regular 70 mile per day commute, and it works great! I will really test it out in a couple of weeks as I head to the beach. Best benefit/$ you can get for your bike if you ride any distance at all.

I have a DL1000 with "custom" taped grips (tennis racket grip tape) and the CB1 fits great. CrampBuster - The Original Motorcycle Cruise Control
 

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i too like mine a lot...untill...it hung up on my glove someway, i don't know how! instead of closing throttle, it went wide open IN TRAFFIC! i was lucky and no harm done. but it made me aware an now i use a throttle lock.
 

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i too like mine a lot...untill...it hung up on my glove someway, i don't know how! instead of closing throttle, it went wide open IN TRAFFIC! i was lucky and no harm done. but it made me aware an now i use a throttle lock.
Crampbusters are one of those things that you think are great until something like this happens. Yes, they have been discussed many times. No, I will never have one on a bike for this exact reason.
 

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I like the "Kuryakin Universal Throttle Boss". It's used the same way, but it's much smaller & less invasive to the grip. It's made of rubber, made for a larger grip. I have Grip Puppies so it works fine. I have ridden from Northern Indiana to the Smoky Mountains without ever engaging my throttle lock, thanks to the Throttle Boss.
 

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Crampbusters are one of those things that you think are great until something like this happens.
True. > 150k miles and no issues. I will keep using and appreciating them on all my bikes.
 

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i too like mine a lot...untill...it hung up on my glove someway, i don't know how! instead of closing throttle, it went wide open IN TRAFFIC! i was lucky and no harm done. but it made me aware an now i use a throttle lock.
I don't understand how this could happen... I've had mine hang up inside my jacket sleeve cuff, but I can't see how that could cause the throttle to get rotated down unless it was positioned wrong to start with. You should still have to turn the throttle forward to reach for the front brake, even with the crampbuster installed. With the throttle closed, you should still be able to grab the brakes comfortably. If grabbing for the brakes opens the throttle, the crampbuster needs to be angled down further.
 

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Take it off while on loose gravel. There have been some funny accidents hanging KLRs on trees lately :)
I haven't used mine in a few years. Nice on pure highway riding. Never cared for it when I'm doing a lot of shifting such as in a city or curvy mountain roads. After hearing this story I'll never try it off road. On a road trip it usually sits in my tank bag and I forget to use it. On my VFR I added Heli bars and a Throttlemeister and still was less comfy :headbang: than on long trips on my almost stock Wee. :yesnod:
 

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Crampbusters are one of those things that you think are great until something like this happens. Yes, they have been discussed many times. No, I will never have one on a bike for this exact reason.
I had one on for a while. There were a couple of instances where it was more distraction than help. When I got heated grips it wouldnt fit anymore - I think that may not be a bad thing.
 

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i too like mine a lot...untill...it hung up on my glove someway, i don't know how! instead of closing throttle, it went wide open IN TRAFFIC! i was lucky and no harm done. but it made me aware an now i use a throttle lock.
The biggest problem I've had with it is hitting it upwards and moving it around the grip. You get used to it being in the lower position, and then when you go to apply the throttle you end up grabbing a lot more then you were planning to. I'm usually aware of this right away. Never really caused a problem, though, and I've had it on my bike for 8 years.
 

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Seemed like a good idea at the time...

To each their own, but no thanks. I tried one for the "best price" (free), and experienced both slippage in cold weather when the grip heaters were used occasionally (despite sometimes riding in bitter cold, I don't seem to need them on all the time, and virtually never on the hottest setting), and unintentional throttle "blips" at slow-speed / turning situations.

On the highway, on a long run, fine, but for variable-speed riding and circumstances requiring precision, no way. Mine sleeps in a bottom drawer now.

I'd had throttle friction-locks on my street bikes, and have one back-ordered for the Wee. The cheaper fix didn't work out for me.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I don't understand how this could happen... I've had mine hang up inside my jacket sleeve cuff, but I can't see how that could cause the throttle to get rotated down unless it was positioned wrong to start with. You should still have to turn the throttle forward to reach for the front brake, even with the crampbuster installed. With the throttle closed, you should still be able to grab the brakes comfortably. If grabbing for the brakes opens the throttle, the crampbuster needs to be angled down further.
It does seem like it would be very difficult for throttle to be opened by any motion similar to going for the brake lever or lifting you hand if your glove, etc was hung on the crampbuster tab. Maybe if the tab was sticking stright up in the air. Mine is angled slightly downward if I let go of the throttle, and way down if I am on the throttle. I'd like to hear more about the details of this incident and learn from it...

In any event, whatever the cause of a stuck-open throttle, practice the old clutch-pull / kill switch combo until it is second nature.

I still like the idea of having a $11 thingie I can pop on for a long trip and take off for more "spirited" or technical rides. I takes 3 seconds and fits nicely in a little pocket in my tank bag.
 

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After seeing this thread, I went and bought one today - only $8 - for a 400km ride tomorrow. I do have a throttle lock waiting for me in Seattle so this will do until I get there in August.
 

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5000 mostly freeway miles with mine so far. I love it.
 

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I've used both styles of crampbuster, and have a strong preference for the version with a wider, shorter paddle/lever. I got the narrower one a few years ago and liked it ok in use, but I kept knocking it out of position when reaching for the grip. Not long after, I saw there was a wider one that didn't stick out as far, so I picked it up and use it to this day.

I had a couple of instances of unintentional acceleration when I first started using it, but nothing too scary. I soon learned how to position it for decent assist without intruding on my control of the throttle. In town I set it so when I rest my hand on the throttle with my wrist straight and fingers on the brake, it just touches my palm and stays at idle. For longer stretches on the highway, I nudge it up a bit so I don't have to crank my wrist down as far to hold at 6500 rpm.

An unexpected benefit is it makes it easier to cover the brake when I'm in traffic.
 

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A crampbuster for every hand!

I use two wide crampbusters, one for each hand grip. I found my left hand was gripping too hard and it would tire after awhile. Resting on the crampbuster, the left can relax a lot more now, but still be holding on. Even on NYC streets, with pot holes and crazy stop and go traffic, neither crampbuster gets in my way. Both of them are situated at the outside ends of the grips so that my thumbs don't rest on them. I have the right crampbuster rotated low enough that it poses no hazard. Other riders look perplexed . . . until they try it. I'm very happy with the set up, especially on longer trips.
 
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