StromTrooper banner

1 - 20 of 37 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
81 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I developed an oil leak. It seemed to be coming from one of the bolts that hold the front bracket for my motech skid plate. When I looked closer I discovered that the bracket had actually cracked the case near the top bolt on the right side. I don't remember any hard hits recently. So I think it was just from movement or flex. The edge of the bracket was in contact with the case and eventually pushed into it enough to crack it. It isn't a rub through, but a small crack about 1/2". I patched it with JB weld and we'll see if that holds up.

Meanwhile I removed those brackets. The skid plate seems plenty sturdy sticking out in front without them. I believe the weld86 plate just sticks out like that without any support. I thought about modifying the brackets with a little grinding to relieve any contacts points but I don't think it's necessary and I don't really want the plate attached to my engine case like it was after this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,955 Posts
That blows. My SW Motech skidplate uses those same bolts for the front mounts. I'm stuck, though, since the HB bars I have don't work with any of the skidplates that have to attach to the crossover bar.

I'll keep an eye on mine...thanks for the heads up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
81 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
If you take a little material off of the brackets around the little holes, so that the edge doesn't contact the case, it would probably prevent this. But I'm not sure those brackets really serve any purpose anyway, so removing them might be just fine. We'll see. The left bracket didn't look like it rubbed the case like the right side did.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,873 Posts
My plastic Hyde racing sump guard is on it's second DL, now with a total of around 170,000k's of undamaged bike above it's head - and it's taken some horrible hits.

The potential for that problem with the sturdier metal guards was the reason I went for the flexible guard instead of solid metal.

It still sucks, and sorry about the damage. This is just an FYI if anyone is looking at that, a guard for a DL 650 doesn't have to be done that way.

Pete
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,361 Posts
This is something to check on all stroms 650 or 1000. I have a skid plate and crash bar set up on my 1K also..brand irrelevant. The rear mount plate on one side was dangerously close to the engine case, so I bent the offending area for more clearance and ground a radius.

Whats worse is the front pair of mounts connect to a cross bar and are very close to my cylinder head near the timing chain area. I have not found a good way to correct this and one substantial hit to the plate will likely drive the plate rearward and crack my cylinder head putting pieces into the engine.

Some of these set ups look great from a distance and absolutely suck in their execution with the mounting system. On mine it would have been so easy to do it correctly....but they did not.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,955 Posts
My plastic Hyde racing sump guard is on it's second DL, now with a total of around 170,000k's of undamaged bike above it's head - and it's taken some horrible hits.

The potential for that problem with the sturdier metal guards was the reason I went for the flexible guard instead of solid metal.

It still sucks, and sorry about the damage. This is just an FYI if anyone is looking at that, a guard for a DL 650 doesn't have to be done that way.

Pete
Back when I bought my 2012, I looked at a Hyde Racing skidplate but they didn't have one available for the new 650. I just looked at their site again, and they still don't list a skidplate for anything newer than a 2009 V-strom. Is their website not up to date, or do you have a 2009 or older?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,823 Posts
I got the Weld86 because I never saw the Hyde listed in stock for my '04 Wee.
Looking at pic of plate mounted with those little bolts made me wonder about the design.
I rather think the big hole under the front cylinder has got to be stronger that the engine case hardware.
With no cradle frame, mounting a bullet proof bash plate is difficult.
Done properly the end design would look and weigh like one of those anti IED trucks the military has on the Eastern Front.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
81 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
I wonder if this was a result of lifting the bike by the skid plate. It was up on a jack for a couple days recently. I don't doubt that the main mounting points underneath can take it, it took a few hard hits on rocks last year before I got it in my head that the bike has limited ground clearance, so it can surely take the weight of the bike, but maybe the whole thing flexes enough to put pressure on those front brackets and straight into the thin side case.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,955 Posts
That might have aggravated the issue, but it's hard to say for sure. I don't know how much of the load would transfer to those mounting bolts if you lifted the whole bike using the skid plate (my skidplate has some pretty substantial mounting brackets under the engine). I might be wrong, but I think the SW Motech instructions recommended not using the skidplate to lift the bike. I really need to get some spools and a rear wheel lift, to make tire changes easier.

I would never rely on my current skidplate to do any serious off roading. It's there mainly to deflect junk that flies up off the road to keep it away from the filter, and judging by the bottom of my plate, there's a lot of that. I've got some pretty good dings in it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,955 Posts
I've always been puzzled by why one would design a protective skid plate ( or crash / engine bars ) to mount to the engine. This seems counter-intuitive to me. :confused:
I don't see a major problem, provided you recognize that the skid plate is actually just a plate to deflect road debris from hitting the bottom of the engine and oil filter. If something hits the skid plate hard enough to damage the engine where the skid plate mounts, I'd still probably rather have that happen than for that same object to hit the engine directly, without the skid plate to at least dissipate the energy a bit. In both cases, the engine might be damaged, but I believe (or hope!) that the damage would be less with the skid plate. It's not a perfect solution at all, but the V-strom's design probably makes it difficult to have a workable skid plate/bash guard. If it's not in some way mounted to the engine in the front, the only other recourse is to secure it to the crossover bar between the crash guards. Even that is a weak spot, since the skid plate is only going to be as strong as the clamps that mount it to the crossover bar, and the strength of the crossover bar itself.

There may be an actual design out there that would work well on the V-strom if you were hucking the bike over rocks and trees, but I don't think I've seen one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
812 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,120 Posts
I don't see a major problem, provided you recognize that the skid plate is actually just a plate to deflect road debris from hitting the bottom of the engine and oil filter. If something hits the skid plate hard enough to damage the engine where the skid plate mounts, I'd still probably rather have that happen than for that same object to hit the engine directly, without the skid plate to at least dissipate the energy a bit. In both cases, the engine might be damaged, but I believe (or hope!) that the damage would be less with the skid plate. It's not a perfect solution at all, but the V-strom's design probably makes it difficult to have a workable skid plate/bash guard. If it's not in some way mounted to the engine in the front, the only other recourse is to secure it to the crossover bar between the crash guards. Even that is a weak spot, since the skid plate is only going to be as strong as the clamps that mount it to the crossover bar, and the strength of the crossover bar itself.

There may be an actual design out there that would work well on the V-strom if you were hucking the bike over rocks and trees, but I don't think I've seen one.
Yes, a Pat Walsh Designs skidder/crash bar is about the best design I've seen, too bad PWD recently got out of the skidder/crash bar game. Doesn't bolt to the engine....and is super strong. Like another poster mentioned, it's clear that bolting a skidder to the engine is potentially a very costly proposition..........kinda short circuits the whole concept, especially when SW's design is so close to the crash bar location they could just bolt to that instead of the engine.....oh well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,955 Posts
I have both crash bars and a skid plate, neither of which touch the engine.

The crash bars are Givi and the skid plate is Adventure MotoStuff Skid Plate for Vstrom ... - Adventure-Proven Motorcycle Gear and Aluminum Panniers

I do ride gravel and some forest service roads so I opted for more protection that just deflection of the occasional rock being kicked up from the front tire. YMMV.
I looked at that skidplate when I first got my bike. It didn't fit with the first generation of HB crash bars that came out for the 2012 DL 650 (those first generation bars didn't have a crossover bar then extended far enough towards the bottom of the engine for the skidplate clamps to reach).

You're correct of course, in that it's a better choice than the engine mounted plates if you're doing off road riding. It would obviously transfer the impact to the crossover bar and not the engine, though I don't believe that it would stand up to any real off-roading type use. For me, the Motech plate was sufficient for my use.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,955 Posts
Yes, a Pat Walsh Designs skidder/crash bar is about the best design I've seen, too bad PWD recently got out of the skidder/crash bar game. Doesn't bolt to the engine....and is super strong. Like another poster mentioned, it's clear that bolting a skidder to the engine is potentially a very costly proposition..........kinda short circuits the whole concept, especially when SW's design is so close to the crash bar location they could just bolt to that instead of the engine.....oh well.
That looks like a nice design. I like the engine guards too; they look like they would actually protect the engine if you dropped the bike (my bars look more like they would protect the plastic on the tank, but I'm not sure how well they would fare with protecting the engine).
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,120 Posts
That looks like a nice design. I like the engine guards too; they look like they would actually protect the engine if you dropped the bike (my bars look more like they would protect the plastic on the tank, but I'm not sure how well they would fare with protecting the engine).
I clipped my wife's car in the driveway with my saddlebags, fell over rather uncerimoniuosly. The PDW bars held the bike off the concrete - no busted turn signals or nothing, and the crash bars weren't even bent. I became a huge fan after that!

I wonder if the bracket for the engine mount, might have actually contacted your engine case ever so slightly, where over the course of riding a few hundred miles caused a vibration that acted as a micro-jackhammer to your engine case, causing a crack to form?
 
1 - 20 of 37 Posts
Top