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Discussion Starter #1
Sadly the splines on my output shaft have been slowly declining. While I have the capability of dropping the motor and splitting the cases. I really don't want to. Has anyone successfully had the splines built up with weld and then filed down so the sprocket fit, while in the bike? The last sprocket and the one I put on yesterday I used a bearing sleeve retainer compound between the splines and sprocket, and then red loctite on the sprocket nut.

The other idea I have been considering is welding the nut to the sprocket.

The bike has 110,000+ miles and has led a hard life. I have a nicer/newer one sitting next to it but I really prefer riding this one as it tells a story and has a lot of sentimental value.

Thoughts?
 

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of course if you weld it on, even small welds. the heat will destroy the shaft seal. then you won't be able to replace the seal because the sprocket is welded on. I think I would try building up the splines with weld. a small amount of weld then cool the shaft with a wet rag then compressed air to cool and dry the area. slowly build up the shaft, then use a 4 inch grinder to reduce the diameter of the shaft while the engine is running in gear to grind it down evenly. then use a dremel and cut off wheel to recut the splines.

But then I am a retired welder and if your only skill is as a welder, then all problems look like welding problems.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
of course if you weld it on, even small welds. the heat will destroy the shaft seal. then you won't be able to replace the seal because the sprocket is welded on. I think I would try building up the splines with weld. a small amount of weld then cool the shaft with a wet rag then compressed air to cool and dry the area. slowly build up the shaft, then use a 4 inch grinder to reduce the diameter of the shaft while the engine is running in gear to grind it down evenly. then use a dremel and cut off wheel to recut the splines.

But then I am a retired welder and if your only skill is as a welder, then all problems look like welding problems.
It's funny, I've been worrying about melting the seal when I've replaced it in the past! I worked for a couple years at a welding shop (operating a lathe), I think the owner would do the welding for me. I may just have him do half of the splines and focus on keeping the sprocket nut tight in the future. Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Just wanted to provide an update/closure for this thread. I had my old boss TIG weld all of the splines on the shaft. I then used a Dremel to shape them until the sprocket fit back on. Did this a few weeks ago and it has kept the nut tight for over 1000 miles. I think it's going to hold as a permanent fix. Also we were even able to keep from destroying the seal 🙂
 

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And you can take the sprocket off to replace the seal if needed in the future. Also you can put more welds on and regrind the splines if needed. One thing I didn't think to mention was how to put the ground on so that welding current didn't pass through the bearings, which would destroy them. You guys knew what you were doing.
 
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