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Discussion Starter #1
Hey everyone.
My 2003 v1000 has been a headache for me. I was riding with a buddy of mine and we stop he tells me it smells like coolant burning when I get on it. Iv looked everywhere no leaks. Bike feels fine. Haven't road it much. Take it out for a ride it's in the 70s. Temp gauge goes full 5 bars and red temp light comes on. I let it cool bring the bike back. Fans working. Ride again same thing in like 15 mins of riding.

When I fist got the bike I was doing a valve inspection and one of the cam guide bolts snapped. I had to take the head off and get the bolt out. When I put it back together I used all new gaskets. Bike ran fine. First thing I checked when I smelled buring coolant was the oil to see if any coolant was in it. It was clean. Checked the coolant. It had no oil in it.
This bike has been driving me crazy. Any suggestions on what to check?
 

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Check the tube connecting the two heads together, that hose in between often leaks, and you need to replace it, or tighten the clamps a bit. Drips from that would land on the head and stink, but you may not notice it unless you get right in there to examine it.
 

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1+ on checking the hose connections and clamps. They like to leak and if you had the hose off very likely do leak a little. You should see traces of the evaporated coolant.

If I remember right I had a similar coolant error on my WEE. Turned out was not a coolant error but a general error because of an intermittent poor connection in the main wiring loom connector or the connector to the instrument panel, can't remember. Did you do any electrical work that could be the cause? Maybe post a picture of what your dash is showing so others can chime in.
 

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On my 2006 I found reusing the coolant hose clamps was a bad idea. Had to go back in and put new clamps on. Problem solved. It only leaked when it was hot.

My coolant hoses are original, I just checked them again today and see no reason to change them yet. Had to replace the fuel lines on mine and the vacuum lines were all cracked and very dry. I just had to replace my vacuum caps again too, suckers were cracked causing an idle issue. But the other stuff still looked good. The caps didn't last long, Chinese rubber I guess, got them from the auto parts store a few years ago

Good time to put dialectic grease in all the connections too while your in there.

If your over heating I bet your problem is more than hose clamps. Does the thermostat work right? I love my little cheap thermal gun for checking hose temps.


Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #7
On my 2006 I found reusing the coolant hose clamps was a bad idea. Had to go back in and put new clamps on. Problem solved. It only leaked when it was hot.

My coolant hoses are original, I just checked them again today and see no reason to change them yet. Had to replace the fuel lines on mine and the vacuum lines were all cracked and very dry. I just had to replace my vacuum caps again too, suckers were cracked causing an idle issue. But the other stuff still looked good. The caps didn't last long, Chinese rubber I guess, got them from the auto parts store a few years ago

Good time to put dialectic grease in all the connections too while your in there.

If your over heating I bet your problem is more than hose clamps. Does the thermostat work right? I love my little cheap thermal gun for checking hose temps.


Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk

I checked all the hoses, No leaks anywhere. I pulled the thermostat the other day and tested it. It opened up and closed at the right temps.
I put everything back together and went for a ride last night. Temp gauge got up to 3 bars. It was 45* out tho.
 

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I checked all the hoses, No leaks anywhere. I pulled the thermostat the other day and tested it. It opened up and closed at the right temps.
I put everything back together and went for a ride last night. Temp gauge got up to 3 bars. It was 45* out tho.
I thought my clamps were fine till the bike got hot on a trip. It actually only leaked at highway speeds. Thankfully the main leaker was on the right side where I could get to it easy.

Make sure you bleed the system, it's been a while, but I think the bleed screws is on the water pump.

I only had issues with the ones on the radiator. So far my coolant hoses are still original. My bike has a plastic radiator guard and it runs a little hotter with it, but I've not seen more than 3 bars ever. Mostly 2 bars if I'm over 45 mph. I only see 3 bars when pulling steep grades in the summer, 2 bars is my normal temp when moving along, hits 3 bars at stop lights.
 

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If you're seeing more than 3 bars under normal riding conditions, something is definitely wrong. The fan should kick in at that point and bring it back down to 2 bars. On that note, you might want to ensure the fan is working properly. Does it engage when the third bar shows? I know you said the fan is working, but perhaps it is not working right?

Another consideration, of course, is the water pump. Maybe the impeller is toast.

Certainly, your problem is not leak-related. You may have a leak, but that's not what is causing the overheating.

Are you losing significant fluid from the water pump drip tube? If so, that points to a pump problem.
 

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Hinow, it's best to pinpoint coolant leaks before you tear anything apart.
I have a couple of my own from work, but you can usually borrow/rent a Cooling System Pressure Tester at most any auto parts store.
The engine can be cold. You remove the radiator cap, install the pressure hose adapter in its place, pump the tester until its gauge reads 10-13 psi....and watch all junctions, hoses, and the radiator itself for leaks. Unless you see a leak right off the bat, let the cooling system sit under pressure for 10 minutes, pump the tester to maintain the 10-13 psi.
The tester will have a radiator cap testing adapter so you can easily test the cap by itself as well.
If your buddy smells coolant from your exhaust, you can remove the spark plugs, pump the tester to 10-13 psi and let it sit under pressure for a good hour. Rotate the engine and look for coolant to be ejected from the spark plug threads. Look at the spark plug electrodes for a greenish deposit. I say this because, even though you replaced the head gasket, you can still have an coolant leaking under pressure into the cooling system. A leakdown test would be conclusive, but that would require compressed air and a spark plug thread adapter.
A cooling system pressure tester is a great tool to have for just checking cooling system integrity.
 

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hinow, is the bike belching coolant from the radiator or the overflow can, when the temp goes up? I had a heat-up issues similar to what you are describing on my 08. One time I pulled into a parking lot and there was a trail of coolant from where I pulled in to where I parked. I chased that problem for days and discovered that my radiator cap was bad. Without the pressure being held, the system overheated and belched coolant. When that splashed on the hot engine, there was a smell. Once I replaced the radiator cap, the heat issue went away.

PS. When I wanted a new rad cap three years ago, none were available and I didn't want to wait days for one being ordered. I went to a local independent auto parts store with my original cap and measuring calipers in hand. The guy pulled out his stack of books and we went through them looking for a 1.1 bar rated cap with the specific measurements of my original one. We landed on a Stant 10233. I don't know what all that particular cap will fit, but it fit my 08 Vee and is still working fine. Just FYI.
 

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I am reading this differently. The bike is going to five bars and the fan runs. I would be testing the thermo-couple (fan trigger switch) that triggers the fan. The fan should be activating somewhere in the 4 bar range. Until you solve the over heat issue, the bike may be burping coolant out the over flow. Pressure testing might be next, but not first.
 

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Actually ST, either I am not seeing the sequence of events, or we're not getting all the information.
My suggestion of a pressure test was in reference to how to look for an external engine leak.
But in all cases of overheat and/or coolant loss the 1st thing I did was a leakdown test. You'd be surprised how many engines Ive tested had a warped head, cracked head, or breach in the head gasket. It doesnt matter what else is bad--and there is no law stating you can have only one issue at a time--if the basic engine has an issue it must be addressed 1st.
Oil in the coolant or coolant in the oil is never a good thing.
The original poster stated he was riding and the temp was in the 70s. If he was riding at speed and not idling, neither the fan switch, circuit, or fan itself would be an issue as air draft at speed would have cooled the radiator.
As posted above, pressure testing the radiator cap could find a fault...but then again the original poster stated that the radiator and coolant reservoir levels were good.
A clogged or partially clogged radiator is also a possibility, as is a loose water pump impeller, both of which Ive seen many times on various vehicles.
It's all a matter of heat transfer. Engine heat-->coolant-->radiator(through thermostat)-->outside air--> back to engine. Anything that interferes with that heat transfer is a problem.
Then you have the issue that the cooling system is operating correctly and the problem centeres around the temp gauge, its sending unit, and related wiring.
As always, methodical diagnosis in sequence is the key to not only finding the problem, but any possible related problems.
 

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MAZ4ME,

I am 1>2 you are 2>1. Who knows?

The strom has a fan switch that is on one cylinder head. It triggers the fan at a preset temperature, just like a car. When mine failed, at first the gauge went from routinely running at 3 bars to running at 4, under the same ambient conditions. Then it failed and if the air flow (bike speed) was low enough, the thing would throw 5 bars and overheat. The strom is blessed with a big radiator, catching a lot of air flow, my bike hardly ever ran the fan until the switch puked. When it did, the coolant heated, pressurized and then went past the rad cap valve.
 

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My V did the same a few years ago. The water pump seal was starting to fail and a small amount of coolant was getting into the drain cavity and out the overflow tube where it dripped on the exhaust. I lived with it until it started dripping on the floor. Then I resealed the water pump.
 

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MAZ4ME,

I am 1>2 you are 2>1. Who knows?
That's correct, "Who knows?"
Which is why we diagnose. Then we know for sure. It could be this, that, or the other. Or none of the above and something entirely different. We arent there to see this individual vehicle.

This is neither of our 1st rodeos. 43 years of turning wrenches professionally in independent shops and dealerships, you develop a diagnostic path of automotive problem solving.
Cooling system diagnosis in motorcycles is no different than any other vehicles.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Thank you all for giving me some ideas, Hopefully I can figure this out and actually ride. Iv had the bike for 2 years now and only done 1000 miles :(

Last night I looked over every hose made sure they are all tight. Ran the bike for maybe 5 mins the gauge went all the way to 5 bars and coolant was going into the overflow, then I shut it off. My plan for tonight is to do a pressure test on the cooling system. If that reads well I'm going to take a look at the water pump impeller. Test the fan switch, and get a temp gun to see if the coolant line coming into the engine is the same temp as whats coming out. I read this post https://www.stromtrooper.com/dl1000-2002-2012/54340-overheating-any-ideas.html Wondering if I should just replace the thermostat while I have the plastics off.
 

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That's correct, "Who knows?"
Which is why we diagnose. Then we know for sure. It could be this, that, or the other. Or none of the above and something entirely different. We arent there to see this individual vehicle.

This is neither of our 1st rodeos. 43 years of turning wrenches professionally in independent shops and dealerships, you develop a diagnostic path of automotive problem solving.
Cooling system diagnosis in motorcycles is no different than any other vehicles.
Good point. I had a co-worker come in and ask me about the heat in his Maz 626. Said it would not give him heat until he ran it hard at speed. Somehow I have become the "car whisperer" at work. Anyways, I explained how the heat worked and things to check, but first told him to check the coolant level. Well, it was low.

He was over-joyed to have heat and thought we solved his problem. Then I broke the news to him, that coolant went somewhere. :crying2:I have him monitoring the level to see if it is dropping. I have not looked under the hood yet. :confused: May be consulting with you MAZ4ME.

I am not over-impressed with the car yet. I had to replace 2 coil packs before we ended up doing them all. It is a V-6 and getting the rear cylinder bank done was not any fun:furious:. The connectors on the coils were about as cheesy as they come too. I guess Toyota has me spoiled, that is all I have owned for years, 3 in the garage now and what I am most familiar with.
 

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ST, yes, the Mazda6 V6 coil-on-plug connectors are brittle and break easily. Nylon zip-ties to the rescue. The earlier 626 had plug wires with a distributor with an internal coil, the later 626 had a single coil pack feeding all the plug wires.
And it isnt too bad removing the upper intake..as long as you take out the 2 EGR mounting bolts 1st. I never did like taking off intake manifolds and plenums just to get to a maintenance item like spark plugs. If this is an '03 or later it is a Mazda6, if '02 and earlier, it is a 626.
The Mazda 6 V6 is known for water pump leaks, a deteriorated hose connector that feeds the throttle body just behind and to the left of the battery viewed while standing in front of the engine compartment. With miles, you touch it, you break it. Fiberglass-reinforced plastic comes with an attached heater hose. I just did one 3 weeks ago at home. Also, there is a short elbow hose coming off the top rear of the water pump, and it leaks down the front of the transmission. The same V6 in my Mazda Tribute is seeping a bit now, new hose and clamps sitting on my workbench.
The 626 was known for water pump leaks, radiator leaks, and Ive done a few heater cores as well in them.
Toyotas, in some cases, are typically better engineered with higher-spec components. But like all cars, they have their issues as well. My Mazdas have been bulletproof, but they get maintained within an inch of their lives.

I guess if you had to compare, you could say...(dont laugh)....Toyota=BMW R12XX GS, Mazda= '14+ Suzuki DL1000.
T think there's another thread here that talks one against the other...LOL.
 

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Wondering if I should just replace the thermostat while I have the plastics off.
If there is any doubt, I'd replace the thermostat while it's easily accessible. It's possible you have a sticking or inoperable thermostat, and that could eliminate that possibility. Just asking, but when the temp gauge shows high is the radiator core cool to the touch?(careful, engine off, fan off)
 
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