StromTrooper banner

1 - 20 of 32 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'm considering mounting a Garmin Nuvi on my 2012 DL650 I ride probably 70% pavement and 30% gravel roads. I'll use the unit in both car and bike. I'll buy the life time map update option and update with my Macbook Pro. I'm running Yosemite OS X and will upgrade as Apple Software upgrades. I'm NOT tech oriented and I'm susceptible to frustration when faced with complicated tech upgrades.

I'm trying to research the fallowing:

1. I'm reading GPS map upgrades can be frustrating and complicated. Any comments on Mac Yosemite compatability to Garmin?

2. I'm thinking simpler is less problematic. Looking at Garmin models 58LM & 68LM, mounted above the dash on my 2012 DL 650. Any comments on either of these models? I can't justify the price of the Zumo units. I avoid riding in the rain.

3. I bought a bike specific, SW Motech GPS over the dash mount last year but have not mounted it yet. I'm hearing that there might be a vibration problem, with this mount, on gravel roads. Any adjustments or do it yourself tweaks to reduce vibration?

4. Any thoughts on sun light complications or add on shade screen visor?

Thanks for your comments. There seems to be so much marketing hype and I'm trying to sieve out the facts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,149 Posts
I don't know about the models you have chosen but many Gramin Nuvi's will not give instructions via Bluetooth to your helmet.

They have Bluetooth but will not give instructions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
The units I'm looking hardest at are the 58LM and 68LM. They are at the upper end of the Garmin Nuvi "Essential" or basic series. They're touch screen models with basic GPS functions. They don't have Voice Command, Bluetooth, or trip planner.
I'm old school and will also be using paper maps and compass. I'm considering a GPS for mostly congested areas and to supplement paper maps.
. My thoughts are to buy life time map upgrades but stick with a simple unit to reduce update problems. My internet reviews seem to indicate more problems with the complex or high end GPS units.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,611 Posts
old school

I also love paper maps and use them for planning in conjuction with other tools but you will most likely learn how and want to plan your rides with detailed routes and instructions. I think you should consider a GPS unit that has plenty of route capability.
I'm a serious user of a Garmin Zumo 550 on the bike and love the Garmin Nuvi 3597LM in the car.
Being able to modify routes on the way right on the unit, when meeting locals while stopped at restaurants and of course detours and closed roads, is very important.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
851 Posts
The bigger problem with non-moto specific GPS units are the delicate little USB charger connectors. They're just not up to the vigors of being mounted on a motorcycle. I went through 2 Garmins before I gave up and bought a used Zumo 550. I'm sure there will be someone that chimes in that they have had theirs mounted for a gazillion miles without problems but that my 2 cts.

I also found that the over the dash mounts are not that stable. OK for the slab but they bounce around too much for much off road work. One of the problems is that the front cowl where the windshield is mounted is not rigidly mounted and bounces around quite a bit and this is what the over the dash mounts are mounted to.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,149 Posts
By not having Bluetooth instructions being able to see the screen will play a huge part in your ability to use the GPS, you will spend a lot of time looking at a hard to see screen.

My thoughts are that could me put into a life threatening situation which would make a Zumo a very cheap product.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
508 Posts
I have been using a nuvi 14xx on my Vee for a few years. Bought a cradle from GPS city and attached it to the handle bar, more or less covering the speedometer. Vibrations are low, screen easily tilted so it is readable in almost all conditions. It is rendered waterproof by putting a ziplock bag over it when it rains (use electrical tape to keep it place against the wind). A point was raised that the usb connector wants to come out-- after awhile it does... I use a small strip of cloth that I jam into the cradle to keep the connector in place.

The 58LM & 68LM are similar to the 14xx and should work fine. I thought about buying the zumo but too much money for what it's worth.

Also map updating is straight forward using garmin express ( on windows anyway)

Have a good one

Brian
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the replies.
If I'm reading Garmin's information correctly both Garmin Nuvi models (58LM & 68LM) have the "Trip Planner" and 1000 way points. I've never used these but if I understand correctly, I could lay out a route and enter way points.

I have read comments that the SW Motech vibration-dampened mount vibrates. I bought it a year ago so I'm kind of stuck with it. Some say they work good on pavement but not on gravel. Others claim the vibration can be reduced by adjusting the tightness of the rubberized connections. I'll give it a try. If it's useless, well I will have learned a lesson about the manufature and avoid them in the future.

I have Bluetooth in my car and never use it so I do't see that as a viable option.

The power connection is a concern. I'll have to think about that vs a Zumo or Rider unit.

Thanks for the input. I'll keep researching options.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,740 Posts
When you buy a car GPS one of the most important aspects is how bright it is. Normal car GPS are not very bright and you will not be able to see the information you need when the GPS is in bright sunshine! Since most of us prefer to ride when it's nice, this is a real problem.

I use a 3790LT. It is very bright but has a very reflective screen. By adding an anti reflex screen protector it is still quite bright but not as reflective, so that works in direct sunlight. With a ram mount and all openings of the GPS taped shut, it has served me well. You can rotate it 90*. And it does routes, essential for trip planning. Not as good as a MC GPS but now bought used only a fraction of the price. I have it mounted over the dash on a custom dash shelve. Yes it vibrates but when the going is rough you focus on the road, not the GPS. Once the road is reasonable then there is no problem reading the GPS. And you do it without taking your eyes of the road completely!

As regards the power supply. It uses a regular cigarette lighter plug to USB power supply. That has never come out of the speaker unit that cradles the GPS. But you need a power outlet somewhere close by. I mounted mine underneath the dash/ instrument panel and I have 2 power cords installed, one for my ancient GPS that I use around town and don't bother to take off and the one I use for trips. Those cigarette lighter plugs do want to vibrate out, so if the unit stops looses power, that is likely the problem.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,257 Posts
By not having Bluetooth instructions being able to see the screen will play a huge part in your ability to use the GPS, you will spend a lot of time looking at a hard to see screen.

My thoughts are that could me into a life threatening situation which would make a Zumo a very cheap product.
I guess...

I don't live in a large city and avoid them whenever I can, so maybe I don't understand. But I've never felt like looking at my GPS has been a life threatening situation, sunny day or not.

Usually my instructions are numerous miles apart, 18 miles, 70 miles, 200 miles, etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
140 Posts
I have a Zumo 660 matched with a Sena head set and used it on a cross country trip last summer. I used it to plan the trip, find my daily destination and for navigating in urban areas. It also gives accurate speeds on the road compared to the famously overstated Suzuki speedometer.

In the winter it gets used in the SUV.

The verbal instructions in the helmet are a great feature in the cities when you really want to be watching traffic. Sometimes there were problems with sun glare but not often and that is true with any screen.

The only feature I do not use was the streaming of music which is of poor quality with the Zumo 660. I just use the iphone which has terrific quality.

I would suggest purchasing one designed for the purpose you need. I justified the expense like most of my other VStrom farkles...... "it is for safety" and "I deserve it"
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
NewMarketStrom, you've got rethinking things. Maybe I'll look at the Zumo.

Does anyone run a Zumo 660 and use Mac, Yosemite as their download/update software? If so, how well does it work? I have read Mac, Yosemite and Tom-Tom Rider does not work. I'm wondering if the Garmin software is also designed around "Windows" and Yosemite might be problematic. My tech. skills are limited at best. I've read some reviews that say updating the Zumo 660 is VERY frustrating. That was one of the main reasons I was considering the Nuvi over the Zumo. My thoughts were the Nuvi model is "less complicated = less problems".

Thanks again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
233 Posts
I have a Nuvi 50 and when I got it I had Yosemite on my Macbook Pro. The Nuvi was $50 on sale. I had no problems with the maps or upgrades on the Mac with Yosemite. I too cannot afford a Zumo at this time but one day I will probably have one. Also if you go to Apple support you can down load El Capitan for free, a new system. I have not tried the Nuvi with El Capitan yet but I suspect there will be no issues. That is why I have Mac's, just years of trouble free usage. In fact I am typing this on my 7 year old Macbook that has the original battery. When I bought Windows based products I couldn't get 3 years out of them. And the issues with Windows were ongoing and a total pain in the ass
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
1,323 Posts
Very interested in this thread as well - I'm comparing Zumo 660, 665 and 390 units with the intent to buy in 30 days.

I've successfully used my iPhone and the Google Maps, TomTom and MotionX apps over the last 3 years but I'm riding outside of cell coverage and in rougher terrain where I wouldn't want to be dependent on a non-ruggedized nav unit. God forbid my phone get damaged and I'd lose both nav and communication abilities out in the boonies.

The 660 is discontinued. The 665 is pretty much a 660 with xm capabilities. The 390 is pretty much a 590 with a smaller, non-transrefractive display.

I too would be using this with a Mac and Sena (20S).
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
16,231 Posts
Very interested in this thread as well - I'm comparing Zumo 660, 665 and 390 units with the intent to buy in 30 days.

I've successfully used my iPhone and the Google Maps, TomTom and MotionX apps over the last 3 years but I'm riding outside of cell coverage and in rougher terrain where I wouldn't want to be dependent on a non-ruggedized nav unit. God forbid my phone get damaged and I'd lose both nav and communication abilities out in the boonies.

The 660 is discontinued. The 665 is pretty much a 660 with xm capabilities. The 390 is pretty much a 590 with a smaller, non-transrefractive display.

I too would be using this with a Mac and Sena (20S).
I will get the Tom Tom. >:)
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
16,231 Posts
Big B , Could you expand a little on that please ?
The Tom Tom Rider II is the "previous" edition of their GPS, and it is a damn good one. Their latest model is the 400 and is brand new, not much chatter out there yet about it. To be honest I will likely go with the Garmin 660LM and be done with it, will be a HUGE improvement over what I have. :smile2:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
81 Posts
If your eyesight is not too bad I would strongly recommend an etrex 30X. I have used the etrex models for over 200,000km in all terrains and weathers, plus in cars, and they work really well.

I recently bought a 590LM and am not convinced they are that much of an improvement. No voice, but the guidance is fine.

Free maps are available for everywhere via OpenStreetMap, and can be installed using Mapmanager, and Mapinstall on OSX. get also Javawa for minor tweaks if needed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
I've used the Zumo 660 with a Mac running Yosemite (and now, El Capitan) with great success. I use both Garmin's BaseCamp for trip planning on my computer, and Express (for simple updates from my wife's computer).
The map updating process is fairly simple with these units.They released the "Garmin Express" software (maybe 2 years ago?) to deal specifically with making the updates easy. I think they nailed it!

Don't underestimate the value of a GPS being able to speak instructions to you over a Bluetooth connection, especially now that Garmin has upgraded their units to speak "real world" instructions. When on a busy road in an area I have never visited before, I love having my GPS say things like "turn left at the Texaco". Makes it dead-simple for me to process the instructions without losing any mental, or visual focus on the road or traffic.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
1,323 Posts
I decided to order a 390LM today. I'll get to use it for a few weeks in the car before installing bike wiring, so I'll return it if it doesn't work out. I'm pretty excited about having a real, waterproof gps this season.
 
1 - 20 of 32 Posts
Top