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Discussion Starter #1
I hope this isn't too long for all of you, but I wanted to tell me story in hopes to get some good advice. I have gotten tons of bad advice related to this over the years. Most of it involves either "buy a harley!" or that I am an idiot. I am pretty particular about my bikes, and a lot of that is related to my physical size and health issues. If a bike doesn't fit me right, I am just not happy.

I have 6'2", 34" inseam, 225lbs. I currently ride a SV650s. I have modified it with GSXR front end, bars (5" rise over stock, nearly straight up and down riding position), 1" lowered pegs, "Great Day to Ride" seat, aftermarket touring labelled windshield, hard bags and trunk. Also have a sheepskin I use on dry days. I went up 1 tooth on the front sprocket, not just to lower cruising rpm, but also to tame it a little down low. It has a few other things, but that is the mods most applicable to long distance riding.

It has plenty of power and I have no complaints there. I have had this bike for a couple of years and I am still quite impressed with its get up and go. I mostly just cruise and rarely get on it, but when I do...wow. I love the engine, the powerband, the sound (aftermarket pipes), and reliability. Maybe I am just easily impressed.

However, the bike just wears me out. 2 hours of ride time and I am ready for a long break. I have done 4 hours in one day with about an hour break at the 2 hour mark and I couldn't even look at the bike for a week afterwards. The arthritis in my knees gives me fits with the knee bend. However, I can stretch out over the frame sliders for a bit and ease that. However, the "pain in the ass" never ceases. The spencer seat helped a lot (from 20 minutes to 2 hours), but it doesn't fix it. I have tried other seats and the spencer works the best. I blame this on the still slightly leaned over (measured 1 degree) riding position and angle of the hips. The wing turbulence is also very tiring. Some mini-apes would likely solve a lot of my problems. However, I have reached a point where I am fighting a losing battle. I need a bike that fits me better.

I have road a KLR650 approx 10 miles. It had highway pegs. For 10 miles (you can't hardly tell long distance ability from that, I understand. The SV is really comfortable short distances) the bike road like a dream. I couldn't believe how comfortable it was, especially when I used the highway pegs. The powerplant is a joke and I would never consider a KLR for that reason. However, that got my interested. I went to the dealer last year and sat on a v-strom. It reminded me heavily of the SV. My knee/leg position felt the same and it didn't feel any better or any less leaned over than my SV. I was not able to test ride one. The thought of the v-strom intrigued me greatly as I love the SV engine, just not the ergo's.

I have owned (and still do) various old school japanese bikes, Suzuki GS's, Honda CB's namely. I have not found their ergo's to be great long distance either. Fantastic around town and short distances, however.

I owned a Boulevard C50T for one riding season. I only took it on 1 long 4 hour trip and it was alright. Stock bars, mustang seat. No pain, some discomfort, but it wasn't too bad. However, the handling of the cruiser made me give it up. While the C50 is pretty flickable for a cruiser, it is nothing compared to my SV. The power was also pretty sad. I ride daily, in all weather except snow/ice, and I want a bike to respond instantly under all conditions. When someone pulls out in front of me, I need to be able to swerve and stop without worry. Didn't get that in the boulevard. It was a beautiful bike by all rights, but I couldn't keep it. The boulevard was the first new style bike I have ever owned. I bought it in 2008. Up until then I had road GS/CB's my whole life. I went back to a CB as my main bike until 2012 when I bought the SV. I was wanting better long distance ability.

The pain in my backside and the requirement that I often take long trips (I have a mandatory 4 hour ride every week, plus normal commute and such) has got me looking for something different. A requirement for me is ABS brakes. I have had too many close calls...and too many wrecks. I will never claim I am the best rider in the world, and riding daily under all conditions, I require ABS.

I just recently learned of the new 2014 V-Strom 1000 Adventure. I have been reading about it for a solid week now in my spare time, including this forum. My local dealer has one coming in soon, they are selling as quick as he can get them! Thus I haven't seen one yet. I have been to a few dealers all over Indiana and they all will only demo used bikes. There won't be any used bikes on the showroom for quite a while.

What is everyone's thoughts on the new v-strom and what I have said here? I am looking into the 1000 instead of the 650 due to its new features, and while I am perfectly happy with the 650 on my sv....I know I would be happier with the 1000 :). This is especially true once I load it down more for longer trips and ride 2up. Do you believe I will be happy with the riding position on the new v-strom? I am fine making realistic mods, as I have done a lot to the SV. However, I have heard some less than ideal things regarding the bars and installing risers. ABS lines and such, may not be as easy as I am used to. I am not expecting cross-country touring, goldwing standard, but ease of day long rides. I will learn a lot looking at them in the showroom, but since I won't come across a used one to demo for quite a while, this spawns the question. I am looking for a new bike fairly soon.
 

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Get the new V-Strom 1000 and it will solve all your dilemmas :yesnod:

If you like the V-Twin 650 powerplant, then you will love the new 1000 V-Twin!
Great engine.

Plus brakes, suspension, handling are all vastly improved.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The SV, especially once I got the suspension halfway tuned, will handle quite nicely. I have already contacted sonic springs and they don't have a plan/schedule for releasing fork springs for the new strom. He said that once they get one in the shop for disassemble, they will create springs. Respringing for my weight is the first thing I do now for any bike. I do like the adjustable suspension and better design on the new strom. A respring is probably all it will need to be a great handler.

I guess you could say my main question here involves the bars. Does anyone here, at around my height of 6'2" have one of the new stroms and take it on long trips? My current weekly "commute" ride that I must do is 4 hours. I would love to be able to do 6-8 in a day. With the issues of installing risers or taller bars with all of the newfound stuff, this is probably the biggest issue. Highway pegs are already out and an easy deal.

Last fall I test road a new vulcan on the same day I looked at the vstrom. I was actually starting to sign papers on that bike, but backed out because the dealer changed the financing terms at the last minute (and sneakily). The bike was smooth for the test ride. They had another c50 there, so I road it as well just for a back to back comparison. The vulcan was superior to the c50 in every way that I could tell. Test ride wasn't very long, but the bike was smooth, quite comfortable, and felt more responsive in the handling and braking department. Played with some harley's. Bikes were beautiful with a lot of character (take that as you will). I love the wide glide. Handled a lot worse than the vulcan by all rights, but powerful and beautiful and did "glide" on the freeway. I just can't get over the price tag, even used. Harley as ABS, vulcan does not. This is a pretty big negative, and one of my main features I was looking for.

Next weekend I am being loaned a vulcan to take on my standard journey. I am very excited about that. I also found a used one for sale with all of my standard mods done. At this point, I believe it is down to the strom or the vulcan. I will know quite a bit about the vulcan next week.
 

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There is a very good reason why the BMW 1200GS is considered by many to be the best all around motorcycle money can buy, and the V-Strom's are in that same category. ;)
 

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Next weekend I am being loaned a vulcan to take on my standard journey. I am very excited about that. I also found a used one for sale with all of my standard mods done. At this point, I believe it is down to the strom or the vulcan. I will know quite a bit about the vulcan next week.

See if you can ride both for more than a couple hours to see how the seating positions work out for you. You might not be able to tell a big difference with less than that. Why?

I rode my buddy's cruiser this week after selling mine in December for a '13 DL650. His was ok but the ride reminded me of how much pressure is angled into one' lower back and rear, vs. the Strom. I also didn't like being unable to stand up on the cruiser to give my rump a break.

Love my Strom.
 

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V STroms ( pick any model/year ) are about the most comfortable bikes I have ever ridden. Plenty of room, good ergonomics.

A KLR 650 is NOT a touring bike.

An SV 650 is good at what it is, but the V Strom ergonomics are much better suited for longer days in the saddle.

They all need some personalization-windscreen changes, seat changes, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I'll have the vulcan for a 4 hour ride next weekend. I won't have that with the vstrom. I'll have a good idea what I think of the vulcan. If the ergos are anything like the c50, I won't have much issue there. We will find out, however.

I have researched the bmw extensively as well, as well as sport touring bikes such as the fjr. To me, the strom wins the cost vs features war. The bmw bikes are just too expensive. Same goes for the fjr/st and other true sport touring bikes. I have road an old gl1100 goldwing and thought it was smooth and very surprisingly well balanced. I have considered buying an early model gl1500, which is in my price range, but the wing is more bike
 

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This is going to sound stupid

Looking at your post Brad4321 -- you talk about two problem areas.
The arthritic knees pain and the sitting discomfort.
They are two issues quite different from each other.
I have the 2012 VStrom 650 and have sat on the new 1000 VStrom. (the ergos on the 1000 are no better)
I rode my VStrom thousands of klms last November travelling up to 8 hrs per day and nearly 1000 klm on one day. I have only a few modifications - including bar risers. One extra that made that trip easy on the body was the AirHawk R air seat pad. That would fix your sitting issue for sure -- but not the knee pain issue. This is going to sound stupid -- but, a person in a local magazine for older riders just chanced upon a ride of one of those larger scooters as a loaner while their bike was in for service -- and traded in a bought the scooter. They were riding their Triumph less and less due to the knee pain. There are 400cc & 650cc scooters and even an 850 cc scooter. The seat pain is not hard to fix -- and the AirHawk is probably the cheapest fix. However, without fixing the knees issue you're not going to be happy.
Happy hunting :)
 

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Discussion Starter #9
The problem is I am only 27 years old and already have arthritis! I'm not ready for the scooter yet!

A bike with mid controls and highway pegs, or vis versa, solves the knee pain. I have to keep moving my legs. As long as I have a couple different positions, and none of those has a strong bend in the knee (like the sv does), I am ok. Forward controls work very well for me, especially if I can install a mid peg of some sort. I agree that having a mid peg and lifting myself off the seat is a huge benefit (I don't ride off-road dirt track trails, but I don't always ride on nice paved surfaces either). I would feel a lot more confident on a strom (or sv for that matter) over a cruiser on some of the roads I ride. I'll be on the interstate for 4 hours, then down dirt/gravel roads for another 30 minutes. When the road is washed out, cruisers will drag with the low ground clearance.

When I sat on a strom the knee bend didn't feel any better to me than on my sv with lowered pegs. Highway pegs can fix that to a certain extent, but it didn't feel ideal. The mid pegs on the KLR felt better. Have you looked at Motorcycle Ergonomics ? That website is awesome for comparing motorcycle ergonomics. According to it, the DL650 I sat on has a knee angle (for my size) of 77 degrees. The KLR I road is 86 degrees. The new DL1000 is 82. While the KLR still has the best knee angle, the 2014 DL1000 is better than the DL650 I sat on. This is interesting. The KLR also sits more upright than either suzuki by a few degrees. According to this site, if I take a new DL1000 and move the pegs 1", it will match the KLR. Of course, the vulcan beats all here by a few degrees more.

I am not afraid of doing a few mods (look what I have done with the sv). However, I need a better platform to work with. I am eyeballing now, but plan on running the SV out the rest of this season. Once the '15 models roll in, I can get a '14 for a decent price I have a feeling. The new vulcans have abs as well. It may sound like I am comparing very different bikes, but they all have the same purpose in mind of long distance ability and have similar ergo's. Its hard to pass up the classic v-twin cruiser look of the vulcan. The strom isn't much to look at. Granted, I ride my bike, not stare at it. I just know when I had the boulevard, my heart skipped when I walk into the garage. On the SV, it skips when I roll on the throttle!
 

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Bike setup is no black art or mystery. The DL is very much based on the SV in terms of its frame/seat/peg relationship. There is nothing there that is not easily altered. Richland Rick peg lowering kit, have the saddle reshaped to put you where you want to be, alter the bars to put them where you want.
I know that sounds like a fair amount of work but one thing you will get that is very important is a more comfortable bike. I've owned a KLR and the thing they do which is not desirable is vibrate, in fact they vibrate a lot. If you can tolerate it no problem but if you already have trouble with arthritis I can't imagine it being pleasant. There is also not much you can do about the vibration, its inherent in the design of the bike.
If touring is your thing, of what you've mentioned the DL is going to be your best bet and the easiest one to work with in terms of getting it right.
 

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No doubt you can make a Strom to work well for you, I know you like the Vulcan as far as cruiser/baggers go, but have you ridden or looked at the Yamaha Star motorcycles? The Vulcan line up is nice, but for me a Star model would be my first choice in Japanese cruisers.
 

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No doubt you can make a Strom to work well for you, I know you like the Vulcan as far as cruiser/baggers go, but have you ridden or looked at the Yamaha Star motorcycles? The Vulcan line up is nice, but for me a Star model would be my first choice in Japanese cruisers.
The V-Star lineup is rock-solid (I owned a 2001 1100 Custom) and could be rigged to offer the best knee angle, but man, my lower back and glutes did not like long rides with its forward controls. I'd hope he wouldn't be trading one problem for another.

Rick's DL650 peg lowering kit <- very nice. I got one, and the only down side is that I now really like standing while riding, and worry a cop will misinterpret it as wreckless. :green_lol:
 

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Discussion Starter #13
The klr is a joke for a street bike. I am only using it as a comparison for ergos as I found them quite comfortable. That is all.

Do not care for the v-stars.
 

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Sorry, phone submitted before I was done typing for some reason. I do not care for the v-stars. I did give them a good long look, but they did not feel comfortable to me. I can't say what it was for sure, it was a while ago that I looked, but I ruled them out pretty quickly.

The closest dealer to me shows a 14 in stock. I'm going to see if I can get a look before it is gone. I am leaning towards the Strom as far as specs go. It is the most versatile and useful bike. The ergos look good on paper. Of course, I may have a completely different opinions once I sit on one!
 

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I'll have the vulcan for a 4 hour ride next weekend. I won't have that with the vstrom. I'll have a good idea what I think of the vulcan. If the ergos are anything like the c50, I won't have much issue there. We will find out, however.

I have researched the bmw extensively as well, as well as sport touring bikes such as the fjr. To me, the strom wins the cost vs features war. The bmw bikes are just too expensive. Same goes for the fjr/st and other true sport touring bikes. I have road an old gl1100 goldwing and thought it was smooth and very surprisingly well balanced. I have considered buying an early model gl1500, which is in my price range, but the wing is more bike
I would relook at the FJR if you want sport and touring. I have seen 2011-2012 FJRs for $10k give or take 1k, some with only 5-10k miles( barely warming up), which is below the new 1000 DL . I rode and FJR for 5 years before I just put a down payment on a 650 strom, and it was comfortable for me. My dynamics are very different from you -5'9" 185. I think most folks always have to do some mods- windscreens, pegs, sometimes risers to get in the zone. I am excited about the new to me strom, but would throw a good word in for the feejer. It moved very well for a bigger bike. Side cases are huge- easily fits full face helmet. Mileage is mid 40s (throttle control dependent). No knee issues for me but I would stretch the legs out on the frame sliders after a 100 miles or so. There are highway peg set ups. Shaft drive=no chain maintenance

Cool ergo website. I can appreciate the draw of the cruiser if you like the forward controls ( former HD owner). Good luck in your search, just remember hunting for the "perfect" bike sometimes means you spend too much time spinning your metaphorical wheels instead of the literal ones.
 

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The problem is I am only 27 years old and already have arthritis! I'm not ready for the scooter yet!
...
I can sympathize with you! I have suffered from Arthritis for more than 35 years. I have had injections on my knees that effectively greased the knee joints. I am very fortunate that over the last two or three years we found some medicines that have largely kept it under control. Before that I was in constant pain on bikes and took great effort to make sure that the ergos were setup for me.

Before getting my Strom I tried out a friend's SV650S. The ergos on that bike put my wrists in extreme pain for several days.. Just too much weight on them. I found nothing in common sitting on the SV vs sitting on a Strom. BTW my wife has a Gladius and I love the few times I have managed to ride it even thought I am way too big for it (6'2 and heavy) It is a bit more upright that the SV was and feels great to ride!

Throttle rockers, throttle locks, lowered footpegs, highway bars are all important things for me. As were raising the handlebars and on my 2006 changing the bar for a different wrist angle (I had broken both my wrists at some time in my life and my right wrist was never diagnosed as broken and we discovered that about three years after so it has never healed properly.)

On top of all that I ride a fair amount. 40,000km/25,000 or more miles per year. My Stroms are workhorses that need to work properly for me in every way and not bought to admire or impress others so making sure I am comfy is important to me! The beauty of these bikes is that they are effectively universal bikes. You sit upright so that you are at a fairly natural position and can adjust most things to fit you.


..Tom
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Hate to leave everyone hanging (I know you have all been losing sleep over this!), so I will give my update. I got the bike for more than just the weekend, I am going to have it for 3 weeks total. This is much longer than expected, and very generous. I now have 800 miles on the bike and have made a few conclusions.

There is no power to speak of. Engine runs out of steam fast and didn't have much steam to start with. Will cruise happily at 65mph or less, above that vibrations set in at an exponentially increasing level. Maximum top speed I was able to hit on a very long straightaway was 90mph. Above 80 she just falls on her face. Granted, I am spoiled by the SV's power, but this is also a v-twin of significantly more CC's. This does not surprise me at all, of course, having owned a C50 boulevard. It has plenty of power cruising around, but it did take its toll on me for my extended interstate trip. Changing the pulleys will help this a lot. The engine is out of its powerband going down the interstate. I always look for 6th. Changing the pulleys would likely make me happy with it in regards to vibration. Still could use a turbo... Handling is obviously different than what I have grown accustom to. Once I got the feel and confidence level up I can control it about as well at slow speeds as the SV. Steering is heavy, but not to the level I feel uncomfortable. She is pretty flickable, but you better not get too crazy or the crashbars will hit.

No turning clearance at all. Barely lean the bike over and parts are scraping. This is a huge complaint to me. I don't ride that aggressively, but it is real comforting to know I can safety swerve at speed, or have a little reserve when the corner is tighter than I expected. I don't feel that on the vulcan. The stock tires are horrible. The follow road groves bad and the rear end does not feel planted when getting on it either in throttle or turns. I have felt a few unsettling shimmys from the back and a few from the front as well. Bike follows road grooves worse than any other bike I have ever ridden. It gets stuck in grooves that I didn't even notice on the SV and I have to input fairly strong steering commands to get the bike to leave the groove. Never once really feared going down, but it doesn't feel right. Granted, this is stock tires, but with the wire spoked wheels it is stuck running tubes. This is fixable as well, but takes it down another notch to me.

The buffeting is also the worst I have ever experienced on a bike. It blurs my vision. My friend is 5'4" and has buffeting issues as well as myself at 6'2". The stock windshield needs serious modification. There are lots of complaints about this on the vulcan forums. I am getting strong buffeting over the shield as well as from underneath. I considered taking the shield off, but it isn't quick disconnect and I don't want to mess too much since it isn't mine.

The bike has so much plastic. Just about everything but the tank is plastic (the one thing that should be plastic for rust!). The bike looks good and is 200lb lighter than a comparable harley, but I don't see longevity in the plastic parts. Seems very throwaway to me.

Lastly, my back hurts. Yep, just as predicted. The stock seat sucks, but the stock on the SV is worse. I put my airhawk and sheepskin over it and it becomes bearable. The lack of backrest really hurts me on anything over 30 minutes of riding. The bars are too low and have too much pullback. I need 12" apes. The seat is also too low and too far foward. The airhawk/sheepskin thickness helps this to an extent. My hip angle is all wrong (my hips angle upwards, very bad) due to the seat being too low to the floorboards.

Now, it may sound like I think this bike is only useful in the crusher, but that isn't the case at all. Despite my complaints, I love it. The buffeting is a big design flaw, and the turning radius isn't that much different than other cruisers with floorboards, it just isn't something I am used to anymore, and why I sold my cruiser and bought the SV in the first place. The other issues I get with any bike. I am taller than the average rider, thus nothing fits me out of the box. An aftermarket seat with backrest, apes, and highway pegs and I would be happy as can be on this.

The one thing disappointing to me about this bike that isn't fixable for all realistic purposes is its lack of power. Granted I was looking at a 1600 nomad not a 900, but this is an issue for me. This is one thing that excited me about the strom, I knew it would satisfy in that department. Looking at 1/4 times, I know I will also be disappointed in the nomad. I have decided that I like the cruiser styling and ride, but I need more power than what I was looking at. I am looking at power cruisers now. The yamaha warrior has really got my attention lately. Decent cornering clearance, very nice power with tons of aftermarket support. Of course, I love the v-rod ever since it was released, but can't wrap myself around that price tag and don't like the styling either. the vmax is king, of course, but it is a deathtrap as well as costly. I don't trust myself enough to control that much power. I did just get hit with some unexpected medical bills and won't be buying a bike this year at all now. I am not sure I will ever sell the SV, it is a blast to ride especially now that I have suspension set. After accepting a new bike may even be a couple of years out, I bought a nice shock for the rear that will be here next week to finish out my suspension.

Here is a picture of the beauty at the end of my journey last week.




I still would like a strom eventually...nothing wrong with having multiple bikes. May eventually replace the SV with a strom (actually, quite likely), but I've just got to have a cruiser.
 

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Been reading with interest . We are different in size , and i don't have bad knees so we cannot compare . .

I cannot tell you about the v 1000 because i've not rode one . However after waiting patiently for the new v strom to come out , when it did i was first down to the dealers for a test ride and lucky enough he had one .

Anyway first impressions has i put my foot on the peg , and hauled myself on the seat was , the seating position was the same has my 650 , .

BUT , my 650 had been altered , i had the lower seat , i had the lowering pegs , and i have the rox 2" up 1" high risers which makes it very comfortable , (except for the seat ) i cannot go more than 1 hour on that seat without cramp and sore ass , but a airhawk fixed that . .

Anyway the bike fit me just the same , so you may get an idea what the 1000 is like if you test a 650 and i'm sure you will find one to test ride ,

Unfortunatly for me the 1000 was no good , because i could'nt get it off the stand , i'm too short , i found dropping my left leg to the floor , i could'nt get the leverage to get the bike up so that was that .

But if your going to the cruiser style , well i've had the 750 honda ace , the vulcan 900 , both were underpowered , especielly 2 up so i got a vulcan 1500
a good bike but when the gearbox shit itself at 20000 klm i got rid , went to harleys , and then triumphs .

Now speaking of Triumphs , there is probably the best cruiser around the thunderbird , its got plenty of power , handles very good , and although not knees bent mid mount controls its not forward controls either , just in the right spot , , i was very happy with mine , but for touring reasons i ended up with the rocket instead , a great bike but probably not flickable enough for you .

I've thought long and hard on what bike to get , and only own one bike , , but like you that bike would have to do multiple jobs which would include Touring , 2 up sunday rides , lots of twisty hills riding , commute into the city , boulavard crruising . and since i bought the 650 v strom and discovered it , light dirt roads and fire tracks .

I'm afraide theres not one bike that does it all 100% , but after lots of reading , millions of questions looking looking and looking more , not too mention wasting thousands and i mean THOUSANDS of dollars changing bikes my conclusions are , for an all round bike the best one would be either the v strom 1000 or the yammy tenere , for me the v strom would be out its just too tall so tthat would leave the tenere .

But the other option is what i've got 2 bikes . so if your gonna keep the sv , its easy go buy the best cruiser around the Thunderbird ,
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I have the opposite ergo issue. I haven't found a bike I can't flatfoot yet, but at the same time, it is very difficult to find a bike that has a reasonable distance from seat to peg for me. The only bike I have sat on and felt satisfactorily stretched is a harley wideglide/fatbob. I contemplated this bike for a while, however it is easier to move the pegs on another bike than it is to fix all the issues I would have with the wideglide. Sitting on dual-sports/adv bikes typically gives me a comfortable seat height, but the pegs are always too close as well as the bars.

I have had my eye on Triumph, but not for their cruisers, but instead for their triples. Street/Speed Triple has had my eye ever since I bought the SV. I figured it would be my next progression up. I'll admit that I have not looked at their cruisers much. Watched a few of the "magazine review" videos that compared the Thunderbird to other bikes and it always scored well. I have a sweet spot for v-twins and have always seemed to enjoy the v-twins of any brand over other engine configurations. I have passed over their cruisers because of their engine configuration. None of the parallel twins I have owned really impressed me (although we are talking 80's and earlier japanese bikes...GS and CB's)...although I see that triumph has specifically designed this engine to sound and feel like a V. Power is respectable as well. Street/Speed triples are around, but I very rarely see Triumph cruisers of any variation around. Doing a quick look at what's for sale shows me that the pickings are pretty slim.

You have convinced me to give it another hard look. I see that this bike has won awards for its handling...which is very important to me. Rocket III? I have spent some time staring at that bike, but have no interest in owning one. Now, once they make it into a V6.... What's interesting is just how close the thunderbird and rocket III are priced, but just how different their performance is. I am not sure I could realistically consider the thunderbird with the rocket III so close in price.

Its such an interesting time we live in for bikes. There are so many bikes that are so similar and yet so different it is hard to make a decision. Thing is, its hard to go wrong with any of them in the end. This is good for the consumer, but if the metrics would stop trying to copy harley on their cruisers...I would be very happy. That in itself does give a slight nod to triumph's efforts.

The wife has been nagging me lately (actually just started a few weeks ago) to go on some rides. She has never showed interest before. Looking at the vulcan got her going. I bet that if she gets bit, I'll end up with a full dresser before its over. She already said she doesn't want to be in the wind...she won't even roll down the window in a car. If you don't want to be in the wind....motorcycles are probably not for you. :headbang:
 

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Power and V-Twins, you might look into the Victory line-up. If a 6 banger gets your interest I'm seeing low mileage, reasonably priced, 1st gen Valkyries listed in this area. The Valk has upright seating and definitely scoots on down the road. For the Mrs. and the wind issue, good luck. :confused:
 
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