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Discussion Starter #1
I've pretty much lurked this forum so I'm not sure if this is in the right section.

So, I got stationed cross country and had to leave wee for roundabout a year.
After getting it back I did an oil and batt change and oiled up the chain, figured it would be fine.
Well, when I had it running everything was fine but I had no friction in the clutch. Kinda weird.
So I started it up and let it get warm but when I tried to get it in first it just stalled out like I have no clutch lever.

Tried rocking it in gear with motor off and tried forcing it into first but I don't have a hill to use for speed.
I figure I need to bleed the clutch but I doubt that will solve if the plates are stuck. I'm just wondering if anyone has any insight or experience with this sort of thing.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
A bit of an addendum to the post.
Think I said wee but I've got an 07 DL1000
Also, I'd never tried it before so I'm not sure how much force it should take but, with the motor off and bike in first, I can push it with just a bit of force and I suppose turn the pistons a cycle. I don't imagine there's any issue with that but it strikes me as odd because I'd never been able to do that with my last bike.
 

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The DL1000 has a wet clutch system: The clutch plates are "lubricated" (for lack of a better word) with engine oil. If they've been sitting for a while, that oil may have caked and deteriorated somewhat. It should not be too hard though to get them to separate, but it might require a bit of force.

Here's what I would do. First, see if you have enough hydraulic fluid in the reservoir and that the fluid is still good. (Fluid should be clear, not black, and officially needs to be replaced every two years.) Then, inspect the clutch for proper functioning: Open the oil filler port and look down onto the clutch plates. Engage/disengage the clutch lever and you should see the pressure plate engaging and disengaging. It won't be much but some movement should be visible.

If that checks out, then you need to break the clutch plates free. In neutral gear, warm the engine until you have two bars showing. Then shut the bike off. Disengage clutch (pull the lever), put the bike in first or second gear, and with the clutch disengaged (lever pulled), rock the bike forward and back until the clutch plates break free. If you look through the oil filler port carefully you should now see the drive plates and the driven plates move independently of each other.

Once the clutch plates are free you might want to ride the bike a while in stop/start traffic so the clutch is used a lot. That circulates the fresh oil over your clutch plates and helps get rid of any caked oil. And then you might consider doing another oil change, although if everything works fine, I would just forget about it.

What you've done so far (Engine off, 1st gear, let go of the clutch lever, and then push the bike so the engine goes through a revolution) does nothing for the clutch plates as they are fully engaged at all times.
 

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Backpacker has pretty much covered this. Do make sure the clutch slave is actually moving the pressure plate a tiny bit by looking into the oil fill plug opening. Doesn't take much. If so, then it can be broken loose. I have actually had to get the bike moving, then put it in gear, then pull in the clutch and apply the throttle and rear brake to get them loose on a couple bikes.

Once loose they will be fine. These are oil bath, but actually get very little oil into/onto the discs. This can dissipate when sitting and the plates sort of glue themselves together! Not so much that the oil cakes or goes bad, but is squeezed out and off the surfaces.

If the clutch pressure plate isn't moving, you are going to need to flush and bleed the hydraulic master and slave cylinder to get it back in good operating condition. Probably a good idea anyway!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Everything's comin down to the brake fluid in the clutch because when I was rocking it I did have the clutch pulled and it was going straight to engine and when I look into the filler cap theres no movement or response whatsoever.
I'm waiting on some JIS drivers for the reservoir cap to show up from Amazon because theres nowhere to find them out here and I'd prefer not to strip the screws.
Already dealt with that on the clutch for my old kawi 454.
I guess after the fluid change I'll see if the plates are stuck too, because that's relatively likely.
 

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Great that you now know what the problem is. Bleed the air out of that clutch. :grin2:
Just be sure to check that the slave cylinder is not leaking fluid.
 

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I think it is still likely that your clutch plates are just stuck together by the oil film as realshelby said. If the clutch lever feels normal, that is, it has a small amount of free play followed by spring tension, the fluid sector is probably working properly. If the lever goes fully to the grip with no real resistance, its a hydraulic issue. If the plates are stuck you may not be able to see movement in the hole as only the throwout is moving.

BackPacker's procedure should work if it's just stuck. I've always had best success by holding the clutch in and pushing the bike backwards in gear with the engine stopped. It may take quite a push. It seems less likely to try to turn the engine in "reverse".

If, however, the lever collapses to the grip, Brockie has the answer. Hope this is somewhat helpful. DD
 

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Your plates are likely to be stuck together but you would still have a clutch leaver, no pressure at the leaver is your first problem.

If the plates are stuck well and good with the motor running and the "leaver pulled to the grip" give the bike a bit of a push to get it rolling then select first gear.

Get some momentum up then stand on the rear brakes, with the motor moving one way and the sudden stop of the counter shaft sprocket things should break loose.

You may need to do it a few times and if you release the brake in time the bike will not stall.


I have a number of farm bikes that require that treatment every time they come out of the shed.
 

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Plates stuck....or not....you will see the pressure plate move when pulling in the clutch lever. Unless of course there is a problem with the master/slave cylinder. It shouldn't take all that much to break the plates loose. So, my "guess" is the hydraulic system isn't quite right and not allowing full release or possibly not applying pressure to the pushrod to operate the clutch at all.
 

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Unless of course there is a problem with the master/slave cylinder.
This never happens...:wink2:

To the OP: To break the reservoir screws loose (the fact they are stuck suggests it's been a while since the reservoir has been opened up), just tap the screwdriver (one that fits well) with a hammer. You won't break anything if you're sensible about it.

How much fluid is showing in the reservoir?
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Had to wait to get a JIS screwdriver to open up the reservoir and it was super low. Filled the thing up and worked a bit of air out of the system and it shifted like a pro. Probably gonna replace the master cylinders soon because they're a bit old and worn and you can't read through the sight glass very well. Maybe bust the old ones out and fix a watch crystal in there like I did with my old kawi.

Fluid is good and no stuck plates. There is however, the return of an issue that had gone away where the bike will idle way too high (around 3000rpm) so when I'm sitting at a light with the clutch pulled or in neutral it is roaring for no reason and it won't coast and slow down as I let up on the throttle or pull the clutch.
If I adjust the idle screw on the left side it will suddenly drop down to barely able to stay on without stalling. Nothing in between.
 

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Had to wait to get a JIS screwdriver to open up the reservoir and it was super low. Filled the thing up and worked a bit of air out of the system and it shifted like a pro. Probably gonna replace the master cylinders soon because they're a bit old and worn and you can't read through the sight glass very well. Maybe bust the old ones out and fix a watch crystal in there like I did with my old kawi.

Fluid is good and no stuck plates. There is however, the return of an issue that had gone away where the bike will idle way too high (around 3000rpm) so when I'm sitting at a light with the clutch pulled or in neutral it is roaring for no reason and it won't coast and slow down as I let up on the throttle or pull the clutch.
If I adjust the idle screw on the left side it will suddenly drop down to barely able to stay on without stalling. Nothing in between.
Sounds like you need to sync the throttle bodies and then reset idle. Your symptoms happen when this stuff is out of whack.

And your clutch fluid leak won't be at the master cylinder. It will 100% be the slave cylinder that requires your attention. If you look beneath it, you will likely see evidence. Sometimes it is a slow leak, sometimes it just lets go overnight.

If you haven't popped the slave off and the countershaft sprocket cover, I think you might be in for a gooey surprise when you do. That area needs regular cleaning out, especially if you use gunky chain lube and ride in inclement weather. The mess you will find there is at least partially responsible for your fluid leak.
 

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....... There is however, the return of an issue that had gone away where the bike will idle way too high (around 3000rpm) so when I'm sitting at a light with the clutch pulled or in neutral it is roaring for no reason and it won't coast and slow down as I let up on the throttle or pull the clutch.
If I adjust the idle screw on the left side it will suddenly drop down to barely able to stay on without stalling. Nothing in between.
As your bike has sat unused for so long I would be carefully running a couple of tankfuls of fuel through it before looking for your engine problem. Sure, it may be something that needs to be worked on, although it might equally be throttle cables or a injector boot leak.
You say that you have experienced this before. How did you cure it then?
 

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Discussion Starter #14
As your bike has sat unused for so long I would be carefully running a couple of tankfuls of fuel through it before looking for your engine problem. Sure, it may be something that needs to be worked on, although it might equally be throttle cables or a injector boot leak.
You say that you have experienced this before. How did you cure it then?
I had the issue for a while and let the bike sit and warm up to top-three notches and kicked the throttle stop screw up a little bit to keep the idle around 1200 but when I turn it up now to where it isn't idling too low it will rev up to 2500-3000rpm out of nowhere.
I guess the throttle cable may need slack? I'm not sure how much it would cost to go bring it in for TBS and all that if I need to (probably should anyways)
 

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Do a search for "homemade manometer". You can make your own "tool" to do the Throttle Body Synch. Then search how to do that........
 
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