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Been thinking of cleaning my front sprocket.
The service manual says to pull in the clutch lever and secure it.
What stops the slave piston from popping out and loosing all the fluid?
 

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Nothing, but the fluid does not leak out.

See the rant regarding the "clutch design is unreliable" for photos, discussion and a chuckle.
 

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Been thinking of cleaning my front sprocket.
The service manual says to pull in the clutch lever and secure it.
What stops the slave piston from popping out and loosing all the fluid?
That is how I always did it and I never had any issues except the one time I put the bolts back in wrong. Nothing ever popped out and no leaks.
 

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I think this should be on the Must Do list. When I did mine after the Alaska tour, I was surprised to see how much goo had built up in there. I mean it was clogged!
And if you do it, it makes it real easy to check the problematic battery ground and bolt. It sould be removed, cleaned and reset with Locktight. Unfortunately, mine seemed to already be welded in place.
 

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DO NOT bind or squeeze the clutch lever, yes the piston can still work its way out and fly off.....then you have a serious mess. I have owned 2 1000's and done this slave area cleaning many many times......trust me. Also not a bad idea to "bind" the slave piston to the housing, you want it fully compressed when you reinstall anyways.
 

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DO NOT bind or squeeze the clutch lever, yes the piston can still work its way out and fly off.....then you have a serious mess. I have owned 2 1000's and done this slave area cleaning many many times......trust me. Also not a bad idea to "bind" the slave piston to the housing, you want it fully compressed when you reinstall anyways.
Hey there Big B,

Not doubting your method, as a matter of fact I find it the most logical.

However, why then is there a recommendation to squeeze the clutch in the first place?

What is the benefit/reasoning behind squeezing/binding the clutch lever. Does it help with removal/installation?

I just don't get it. If at all, squeezing the clutch would push the piston out of limit and alignment right? :confused:
 

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There is only one reason to tie the clutch lever to the grip. To keep someone from squeezing it till it pops out the piston in the slave cylinder while you have it out. I have no idea where that idea comes from. But I know it has lead to owners messing up installations on clutch baskets by pushing the pressure plate out too far and getting it out of the slots it should be in.
I do NOT recommend tieing the clutch lever to the grip. Put a block of wood or something under it if you think there is a chance it will be tampered with, just don't tie it to the grip. That blocks the return hole for fluid and makes the piston act solid.
 

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Done mine without tieing the lever to the bars. I only put ziptie over the slave piston as it was working its way out while I was cleaning the front sprocket.
 

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I think this should be on the Must Do list. When I did mine after the Alaska tour, I was surprised to see how much goo had built up in there. I mean it was clogged!
And if you do it, it makes it real easy to check the problematic battery ground and bolt. It sould be removed, cleaned and reset with Locktight. Unfortunately, mine seemed to already be welded in place.
Is this the ground affected by the recall? Anyone have a picture of its location?
 

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There is only one reason to tie the clutch lever to the grip. To keep someone from squeezing it till it pops out the piston in the slave cylinder while you have it out. I have no idea where that idea comes from. But I know it has lead to owners messing up installations on clutch baskets by pushing the pressure plate out too far and getting it out of the slots it should be in.
I do NOT recommend tieing the clutch lever to the grip. Put a block of wood or something under it if you think there is a chance it will be tampered with, just don't tie it to the grip. That blocks the return hole for fluid and makes the piston act solid.
There are probably a lot of guys like me -- when you're wrenching on your bike, it usually doesn't take too long before you do something that makes you feel like an idiot!

And then the advice in bold in realshelby's post above shows up, and I have to stare disbelievingly -- 'cause that's exactly what I did using an old broken ball-peen hammer handle. Suddenly I feel again like the genius I obviously am! (Fortunately old age allows me to forget the couple of other idiotic mistakes I made [and documented in a journal which is how I can relate them now] while replacing the clutch push rod seal on my DL1000K6 a while back.)
 

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There are probably a lot of guys like me -- when you're wrenching on your bike, it usually doesn't take too long before you do something that makes you feel like an idiot!

And then the advice in bold in realshelby's post above shows up, and I have to stare disbelievingly -- 'cause that's exactly what I did using an old broken ball-peen hammer handle. Suddenly I feel again like the genius I obviously am! (Fortunately old age allows me to forget the couple of other idiotic mistakes I made [and documented in a journal which is how I can relate them now] while replacing the clutch push rod seal on my DL1000K6 a while back.)
Ha. You never think you will do something like that, but once when I had the front wheel off I grabbed the brake lever, not thinking about what I was doing. At least it didn't make a mess, but had to pry the pistons apart to put the caliper back on.
 

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been reading these sprocket/slave threads... are there any picture walkthroughs of our vintage bikes from start to finish for opening these up either to clean or change the sprocket?
 

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I finally did this task on my bike to clean the front sprocket and clutch piston area.... found that it was all relatively clean. I did bind the clutch lever with some zip ties. no drama to the operation at all.
 

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I finally did this task on my bike to clean the front sprocket and clutch piston area.... found that it was all relatively clean. I did bind the clutch lever with some zip ties. no drama to the operation at all.
Just looking at the dates in this thread. It took you two years to get around to it????

My Papa always said round tuits are hard to come by. :wink2:
 

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Just looking at the dates in this thread. It took you two years to get around to it????

My Papa always said round tuits are hard to come by. :wink2:
I discovered on mine that using regular oil to lube the chain not only makes the chain last forever, but it also keeps crap from piling up in front sprocket area, so I rarely need to look/clean in there anymore.
 

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I discovered on mine that using regular oil to lube the chain not only makes the chain last forever, but it also keeps crap from piling up in front sprocket area, so I rarely need to look/clean in there anymore.

Yes sir I agree with that, my oiler makes little mess behind there too, and what's there wipes right off easily with just a dry rag.
 

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That is a good point. I use 90w gear oil to lube the chain on my 650 ( just like the owners manual recommends!). I do carry spray chain lube when on trips.

I too think the gear oil makes less mess. Probably because the chain lubes all have some type of clinging properties.
 

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I switched to a tutoro oiler over the winter. I'll be curious to see what difference that makes.
 
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