StromTrooper banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
944 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'm the second owner of my '06 Wee. I installed the SV cams/ K&N air filter/Akrapovic slipons/ and PCIII. I now have 56K miles and am about to change the clutch with a Barnett kit. My clutch shows no sign of an issue but at this mileage, and with the excessive clutching on my Key West trip, I want to change it before it causes an issue. I have acquired all the parts and gaskets to do the work and have the factory service manual to guide me(I have experience with my M/X racer), so my question is; Anyone have advice about what to expect as far as unusual snags? Who has done this before...and did you use the Barnett clutch? The only thing I've noticed lately about the clutch is that at the last instant of engagement is that it is a little soft. I did an experiment from a stop light yesterday and found that when I accelerated hard in 1st from a standstill, the clutch was too soft at that last point of engagement. I am looking for a stronger and slightly more abrupt engagement. By 'abrupt', I mean a stronger propelling forward right at the end of the clutch lever engagement.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,019 Posts
Although I never did anything to our wee clutch, I did upgrade the basket on our Vee and it was an easy job. Although the Vee's exibit the same poblem due to a sticking slave push rod, your Wee may just be a lack of adjustment. Other Wee owners will chime in.
As a side note, I have installed Barnett clutch's in other big bore, high torque VTwins and have found them well suited for quick launches and their baskets and hubs strong enough to not strip out from a steel shaft.
However I run a lot of police cone courses and have gone through several Barnett clutch packs from slipping the clutch so much. A call to Barnett confirmed that since this is not their intended use, they will not hold up under this circumstance. I don't know if the Barnett clutch for your Wee is similar in nature, but if one of your worries is excessive clutching on your trip, you might be better off with the OEM pack or give Barnett a call to confirm it won't be problematic.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
944 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Although I never did anything to our wee clutch, I did upgrade the basket on our Vee and it was an easy job. Although the Vee's exibit the same poblem due to a sticking slave push rod, your Wee may just be a lack of adjustment. Other Wee owners will chime in.
As a side note, I have installed Barnett clutch's in other big bore, high torque VTwins and have found them well suited for quick launches and their baskets and hubs strong enough to not strip out from a steel shaft.
However I run a lot of police cone courses and have gone through several Barnett clutch packs from slipping the clutch so much. A call to Barnett confirmed that since this is not their intended use, they will not hold up under this circumstance. I don't know if the Barnett clutch for your Wee is similar in nature, but if one of your worries is excessive clutching on your trip, you might be better off with the OEM pack or give Barnett a call to confirm it won't be problematic.
I do the clutch adjustment at every other oil change which is about 5K miles. It's not that there is ANY problem with the clutch at all, it's just that previous bikes had that slightly abrupt grab right at the point where the clutch is fully engaged. My Wee has never done that and I was just wondering why. Last night, it occurred to me that the 5 rubber cushions in the rear hub might be absorbing the shock which makes the engagement so smooth. I received the Barnett clutch today and it says on the package that it is a carbon fiber kit with ALL plates plus springs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
699 Posts
To the OP

I re-read your post trying to understand what you're trying to achieve. I think the Barnett springs will give you a more solid engagement. It's common for factory springs to get weak, especially by 56K.
My guess is you'll be happy with a new clutch. :thumbup:
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
13,499 Posts
I don't understand why you are spending the money for this.

With over 125,000 miles on my 2006 the clutch works great and has been used hard through most of it's life. I'd keep all the parts for the OEM clutch as they are probably still plenty good.

The closest thing to an issue I had with the clutch was with the actuating mechanism. The spot weld that holds the lever onto the worm drive broke. I fixed for less than $50 Canadian $ and this was (iirc) around 50,000 or 60,000 miles.

..Tom
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
944 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
I don't understand why you are spending the money for this.

With over 125,000 miles on my 2006 the clutch works great and has been used hard through most of it's life. I'd keep all the parts for the OEM clutch as they are probably still plenty good.

The closest thing to an issue I had with the clutch was with the actuating mechanism. The spot weld that holds the lever onto the worm drive broke. I fixed for less than $50 Canadian $ and this was (iirc) around 50,000 or 60,000 miles.

..Tom
Apparently, my original post wasn't clear enough so I will explain further. I'm anal retentive. Yep, I like to plan ahead for possible problems and prevent them happening. I'm planning on an extended trip to the Rockies next spring and would like to feel that my clutch won't be a problem that could strand me. I like to wrench. The cost isn't so high when I do the job myself. I hate to sweat so the cooler weather is an attractive time to do the work. If you get/got 100K + miles on your clutch, great for you. Plus, I simply want to change the clutch. Not trying to be sarcastic, just answering you.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
13,499 Posts
Apparently, my original post wasn't clear enough so ...
Sounds like good reasons for you. I just always find it odd to take the effort to change things when what is there is working fine and likely will for a long time but that's just me I guess.

Good luck with the clutch and I would be interested in knowing how it feels compared to stock once you have done it.

..Tom
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
944 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
For you to get that many miles on your bike on the original clutch is pretty amazing. Do you ride the bike mostly on interstates or other usage where you don't use the clutch that much? I suspect that my clutch is probably stock since I bought the bike with 32K miles on the clock. This last trip was about 1,600 miles(or more) with a ton of stop'n go traffic on A1A and Hwy1 to Key West and back to Sunny Hills, Fla. No such thing as syncing the traffic lights so it was a ton of clutch usage. This trip was not fun for me because of the boring roads, stop'n go traffic lights. Now, Key West was fine as we stayed in a private condo. Peeps there ride scooters. That's the way to see Key West, fly in, rent a scooter, stay at a private condo(much cheaper than a motel and MUCH nicer with kitchens, pools, private parking...etc.). Sorry, rambled on. Anyway, bottom line is that with the amount of clutch usage on this trip + 57K on the clock AND the planned trip to Colorado, I'd feel better with a new clutch, not to mention how I just like to tinker.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
944 Posts
Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
BTW....I understand how you or anyone else might find it odd that I want to install a new clutch when it is working fine with relatively low miles. Conversely, I find it odd that you would continue pushing the limits on your bike at such high mileage when that clutch could begin to slip at any time on a trip or day-to-day riding. From my perspective, why tempt a clutch failure that 'probably' will happen at the worst conceivable time? Murphy's Law. I'm 60 with aching joints and arthritis starting to attack my fingers so I don't want to be stuck on side of the road in the Rockies nearly 2K miles from home. I'm simply trying to prepare for the worst case scenario.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
944 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
I re-read your post trying to understand what you're trying to achieve. I think the Barnett springs will give you a more solid engagement. It's common for factory springs to get weak, especially by 56K.
My guess is you'll be happy with a new clutch. :thumbup:
Good call. Maybe that's why I am experiencing that non-positive engagement right at the end of when the clutch bites. Perhaps it is a combination of the rubber hub 'dampers' plus the the soft spring? If this design is behaving as expected then that is excellent since my clutch engages very VERY smoothly. It'll be interesting to see if the Barnett enages with more authority since it comes with ALL plates + springs. Just received it last week and it appears to be a quality product.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
944 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Clarification; it's not that I'm looking for a more 'solid' , 'intense', 'more abrupt' engagement. I was simply trying to zero in on why my clutch engagement is so sweet and gentle vs experiences with other bikes that bite hard right at the point of full engagement.....like it shoots the bike forward abruptly vs my Wee which is gentle. My Honda 1972 Honda CB750 had that abruptness in the clutch. From a standing start, rev to about 6K and feed the clutch out for a quick start and the clutch would bite 'hard' right at the point of full engagement. My Wee is gentle at that point. Wondering why, but NOT complaining. I simply want to know.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
13,499 Posts
For you to get that many miles on your bike on the original clutch is pretty amazing. Do you ride the bike mostly on interstates or other usage where you don't use the clutch that much?
...
My 2006 had a mix of commuting (which for me was a mix of country roads then insterstate style highway with heavy duty stop and go traffic), day rides with friends, long trips, ripping down backroads, etc, I have never been easy on the bike. I usually shift with the cutch but sometimes don't. I often redline my bike and when I do it is often followed by a fairly hard shift. I didn't baby my 2006 adn am not babying my 2012.

... Conversely, I find it odd that you would continue pushing the limits on your bike at such high mileage when that clutch could begin to slip at any time on a trip or day-to-day riding. From my perspective, why tempt a clutch failure that 'probably' will happen at the worst conceivable time? Murphy's Law. I'm 60 with aching joints and arthritis starting to attack my fingers so I don't want to be stuck on side of the road in the Rockies nearly 2K miles from home. I'm simply trying to prepare for the worst case scenario.
I'm 56 and have had Arthritis for about 30 years. I also have been in the Automobile industry for over 38 years.

I think most clutch issues are related to the clutch not releasing and this is caused by cables, hydralics, or the clutch release mechanism. If you pay a little bit of attention to a clutch it rarely fails quickly. The first signs are a bit of slippage when shifting in higher gears. Car clutches (in general) are not immersed in oil and so can much more easily overheat, warp, and burn out. Clutches in our bikes are immersed in oil which lubricates and cools them. They have multiple plates and (I believe) are oversized for the amount of load that gets transferred through them. I don't know of any reason why a clutch won't last the lifetime of the average bike and I have rarely if ever heard of an outright failure on one of our clutches (perhaps a poll is in order?)

I think worrying about a failure of a clutch while in the middle of nowhere is really over-thinking things. You are much more likely to have a flat, a battery failure, a starter switch failure or some other thing than a clutch failing.

(Of course now I have tempted Murphy so who knows what he'll through at me.)

..Tom
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
944 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
I get your point about paying attention to the clutch and how it will usually show signs of it going bad gradually. That's why I was wondering to myself if that soft engagement was actually a tiny bit of slippage. If the design of the clutch is such that it is gentle, then that's great! With the observations of the possible stronger Barnett springs(if that's the case) and the rubber dampers in the hubs, it will be interesting to see if the Barnett is much different. Hey, it's cooler here now and I have some newly acquired tools to play with.:beatnik:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
944 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Dammit Stanley! Now you've given me more possible issues to worry about....battery....cables....starter switch. Will the incessant worrying every end?!?!? Seriously though, I've addressed some of those already. Changed the throttle and clutch cables with new ones from Motion Pro. New Shorai LFE18 battery. Took apart the starter switch and cleaned all the contacts...and other preventive maintenance tasks. I even replaced the headlamp bulbs when none are blown just to have ALL new ones and put the old bulbs under my seat as spares. I recently went on a 1,600 mile trip to Key West without a single break down so perhaps I'm doing something right. Not even going into the bike prep prior to the trip, but it was quite extensive. Over thinking things? Yep, guilty as charged.:yesnod:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
944 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Just don't call it a farkle . Or we'll all be wanting one !

But do please post up with your results .

Alex

OK. It won't be very soon as I am going to be doing a ton of work on the bike and want to combine tasks so as to avoid unnecessary redundancy.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top