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Discussion Starter #1
Has anybody disabled their clutch kill switch ? I'm thinking if you break a lever there's no starting it so I want to disable the cut out switch on the clutch perch.

Do it with a jumper ? Also, will the bike turn the starter motor in gear if this switch is disabled ??

Thanks
Allan
 

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I have a Suzuki DRZ 400 E dual purpose bike and it also has (had) a kill switch on the clutch lever. On that one all I had to do was disconect the plug in connection and remove it from the clutch lever assembly. I can't say how the one on the Strom operates. Disconnect it and see if the bike will start, if not, then you will need to jumper across the connector which is probably behind the fairing somewhere. Just follow it down. As for your other question the answer is yes. Whether the bike is in gear or not the starter will turn the engine over that's why they have the safety switch on the clutch so that if the bike is in gear and the starter is operated the bike won't all of a sudden take off.
gbritnell
 

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I doubt you could break the lever off low enough to make it impossible to pull so that you could start the engine.

I wouldn't do it. Think about it, if you break off the lever far enough to where you can work the clutch anymore, are you really going to ride the bike anyway like this? LOL, I mean if you do, what are you going to do when you have to come to a stop? Kill the engine? Just store an extra lever in your bag to replace it if needed.
 

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Disabling a safety feature could bite back one day. I wouldn't do it. Safety first.
 

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water warrior said:
Disabling a safety feature could bite back one day. I wouldn't do it. Safety first.
Yeah that's what I'm thinking... The first time you hit the start button without thinking about it and off goes the bike, it goes down, and now you DO have a broken clutch lever!

Water, you have a similar bike history as me... I remember the DT 175 Yamadogs! How'd you like it, lean and mean wasn't it with that tubular steel monoshock rear suspension?! And what about that funky black stripe down the tank and those drum brakes! :lol:
 

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ChrisW123. Yes the little Yammers were pretty decent bikes for their time and purpose. Had two of them, one for my 2nd Ex. She liked it far better than the two SP370 Zuks which were 4 stroke efforts with a lot of poor ideas built in at no extra cost. The Yammers were pretty tough little bikes overall. With a Boysen Reed and slightly smaller front sprocket mine was a real blast but it sure kept me shifting to stay in the power band. With the oil injection system they were pretty much a treat to buzz around on. The rear monoshock was cheap but effective too. Probably the most trouble free bike a person could own at the time.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the info guys, I'll mull this one over a bit. A number of motorcycles I've ridden over the years didn't have this feature. All of them would jump when the starter was engaged and in gear, Harley, Ducati and most recently a BMW.

As for the the spare lever. I once broke the clutch perch and was forced ride almost 100 miles because the spare lever I had was useless (ie nothing to mount it to).

As for riding a bike without a clutch lever, it's really quite easy. To start out (once you have the engine running from the starter or a bump start) you just get along side of the bike and push it up to a couple of mph then jump on and kick it into gear.

As for shifting, all you have to do is make sure you load the tranny with the throttle pretty good just before you want to shift then snap the throttle closed and kick it into (up or down) the next gear. When coming to a stop all you have to do is soft foot the shift lever from 2nd till you hit neutral and do the push thing again to start out.

If you happen to be on any kind of inclline (going down) then all you have to do is dog paddle the bike to get it moving and then kick it into gear. If you happen to be facing the incline then you have to u-turn before you come to a complete stop and face down the hill. When the light changes, you kick it into gear, make your u-turn and be on your way.

I rode a Harley Superglide to the Artic Circle from Dayton, Ohio (and back) with two leather saddle bags and a plastic gas can. You can learn alot by riding inferior equipment.

Allan
 

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Nomadmax, By the Arctic Circle statement you must have ridden to Alaska. That is quite a hike. When ? Where ? I made it to Fairbanks Alaska in a cage and just loved the trip and scenery.
 

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Ahhh, the American fascination with safety.......if you want to disable the cut-out switch, just do it! Plenty of other bikes don't have them fitted, and if your memory is so bad that you can't remember to either pull the clutch in, or start the thing in neutral, then you're in a world of trouble anyway! Oh no, I just remembered, I pulled all those bloody warning stickers off mine as soon as i got it home....hope I haven't compromised my safety!

Just stirring guys, but damn, lighten up a bit.
 

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Barney said:
Oh no, I just remembered, I pulled all those bloody warning stickers off mine as soon as i got it home....hope I haven't compromised my safety!

Just stirring guys, but damn, lighten up a bit.
What!!! You can't do that it's illegal and very unsafe to remove your stickers! :D :D Actually that is one of the first things I did myself. The only label I couldn't get off fully was the one on the swing arm. The plastic pulled off but the paper part under wouldn't budge. :evil:

Nomadmax, thanks for the little tutorial on how to ride without a clutch lever, may come in handy some day. Do a search on "disable clutch cutoff" I've noticed a few threads on doing this.
 

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My bike doesn't have a kill switch. Every now and then (mornings) on my daily commute I'll start it in gear. Wakes me up every time! The jolt makes my finger come off of the starter switch and the bike just shuts off from me holding it and probably from cursing at it also :wink:

Nomadmax, I'd hate to hit traffic riding as you describe. Get AAA Roadside and lay your bones in a motel till you get the parts you need.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I rode to Alaska via the Alaskan Hwy in 03. I crossed from the US to Canada in Sweetgrass and went up through Lethbridge, Calgary and then Dawson Creek where I picked up the Alaskan Hwy.

I slept out every "night" and didn't stay in a motel until Fairbanks. It rained and was fairly cold despite that it late July and August. I picked the worst day to ride to the Arctic Circle but I'd told so many people back home that I was gonna do it that I would have had eat a 100 pound crow if I didn't.

So I set out with my HD and gas can (which I never needed) headed for Fox where I fueled them both up. It was about 41 F and it rained and blew pretty hard. There were a number of times that I stayed upright by pure luck. I'm sure experience had something to do with it (riding continuously since I was 11, I'm 46 now) but the fact remains, many times I was just lucky.

About 5 miles north of the bridge over the Yukon River (wood deck and down hill for crying out loud) there's a place to buy gas (read be robbed) off the west side of the road. I tanked the bike and rode on to the Circle where I had to wait for nearly a half an hour for someone in a 4x4 truck to come by and take my photo for the obligitory "I was there" shot. I have never in my life ridden something as slick as that muddy road.

After that, I rode back to Fairbanks and completed my trip. I'm a novice when it comes to this computer thing. A buddy of mine had me buy a laptop and he put the photos of that trip on here. I don't even own a camera, all I've ever used are throw aways, sometimes (because I generally travel alone) I'll hand them to someone in a car (if I'm on a multi lane road ) for riding photos. I've never had a camera stolen and gotten some neat shots.

If someone can tell me how to post a couple of photos, I send a few pictures of a Harley that was actually ridden (I owned it 23 months an put 54,000 miles on it) and not posed upon. I used to have a sticker on the back of it that said "Are you a real cowboy or are you just playing dress up?"

Allan
 

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Nomadmax, that sounds like the ride of a lifetime. Adventure at it's finest. Nobody just playing dress-up would try that trip. As for being a novice on computers, welcome to the club. I just got this one last Nov. and tripped over Stromtroopers late Dec. while surfing the net. Still getting the hang of it too. Am looking forward to meeting some riders in this area come summer and swapping tales over coffee. Being a relative newbie I want to personally meet the riders and the bikes. That should help a lot with gear selection and preparation for a planned trip through the Rockies in June. Ride Safe Allan.
 

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safety starts with being aware... don't start the bike in gear. I've disabled it on every duel sport I've ever had, and it has never been a problem.
 

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Has anybody disabled their clutch kill switch ?
Also, will the bike turn the starter motor in gear if this switch is disabled ??


I did mine by first removing the hand guard and clutch lever, then the switch itself. Notice that there is a slot in the side of the switch where you can see the actuating plunger move when you push it. Push the plunger in as if the clutch lever is being actuated and drill a very small (3/32") hole thru the plunger and housing. Next, install a cotter pin of the appropriate diameter. There is room for the round end of the cotter in the slot you used to observe and drill the plunger. You will probably have to shorten the "legs" of the cotter pin. Once the legs are bent, it should be ready to test and reassemble.
I like this method because it doesn't require any rewiring or jumpering, and I can put the switch back into operation by simply removing the pin.
Yes, the bike will start in gear after this mod.
 

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Minnstrom

I'm sure you want freedom of choice and all that stuff but the kill switch is a safety device for your benefit. One day it might bite you. If you want to make changes go ahead but make changes that add to your safety. Ride On, Ride Safe.
 
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