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Hello everyone. New rider and new owner and really like the bike though I haven't any experience to compare it yet :)

I apologize in advance but I did try (briefly) to find an answer and quickly thought it would be easier just to ask the question.

In my service manual, it recommends changing the brake and clutch hoses every 4 years. My bike is a 2002 and I have no idea if they have ever been changed. The hoses are not cheap at about $100 per. I'll happily put out the money if it's really a good idea but would it not be reasonable to just give them a good visual inspection and make a judgement call as we do with so many parts?

input please!
 

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Jim, welcome!

Please fill in your profile so we know what you ride and where you are. Seems like a 02VEE?

Others may disagree but I think hardly anybody is replacing these hoses every 4 years. They seem to age very well and as long as the brake lever feel is good and they are not cracked I would leave them alone for now. Once you know the bike better and possibly become less satisfied with how it brakes, then maybe you want to upgrade to SS brakelines and/ or put 4 pot calipers on.

And if you are new to riding, take it easy with this beast! It can get you in trouble real fast!
 

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Personally dont think necessary unless you see bulging or damage.
Fluid's maybe if you dont know the age.
If your gonna pop go for aftermarkets like Galfer's
Mike
 

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A lot of lawyer-speak and CYA in service publications.
I have yet to see a defective brake hose that wasnt caused by a collision or miss-routing.
In cars, cracked and split brake hoses are common. It's even worse due to winter salt corrosion of steel brake lines.
And in cars, Ive seen many instances where the brake hose exterior looked fine...but the inside of the hose deteriorated to the point where fluid couldnt pass to the calipers, or where the pressurized fluid in the caliper couldnt return to the brake master cylinder and caused the calipers to drag. Caused by fluid that had never been changed, turned black and acidic. I havent seen that in motorcycles either, but I replace my brake and hydraulic clutch fluids every year regardless of mileage.
My37 yr-old '81 Honda CB750K has the original front brake hose on it, as does my 18 yr old '00 Kawasaki ZRX1100 both front and rear hoses. All still as new with fresh fluid. I did replace the 750's master cylinder's plastic reservoir due to surface cracking and discoloration. I havent rebuilt the master cylinders or calipers on both bikes either.
Change/flush your brake fluids, keep an eye on everything, and ride.
 

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Absolutely no one actually replaces their brake lines every four years. It's completely unnecessary, and who the hell has that kind of dough to throw away? Rubber lines do deteriorate over time; it's just a lot slower than Suzuki's lawyers seem to think it is.

Many folks, myself included, have replaced the OEM rubber lines with braided stainless. Much better feel and performance, and they do not deteriorate over time. Braided stainless brake lines are basically three layers: a Teflon line inside a jacket made of braided stainless steel wire, with an outer protective coating of tough plastic.

My Vee is wearing a kit of all four hydraulic lines (two front, rear, and clutch) I bought from Murph's kits, made by Spiegler in Ohio. It's $200, less than the cost of a couple of the crappy rubber OEM lines. You get pretty much the finest stainless lines on the planet and you never have to think about them again.
https://www.murphskits.com/product_info.php?cPath=27_113_126&products_id=211&osCsid=tODIfG0Sqyva14b0ubt2
 

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Different opinion, but I wont be using SS kines on my bikes. I dont think they are "crappy" at all.
None of the aftermarket SS kits Ive installed on other's motorcycles fit the original brackets and junctions, and I'm not fond of wire ties holding brake lines to frames and swing arms.
As for feel, that's subjective to the preference of the owner. I dont like the feel of stepping on a brick in cars with SS lines the owner installed and dont care for that feel in motorcycles either. I keep my fluid fresh and bled, and have very little lever or pedal "give".
Braking power is a function of the ratio of master cylinder piston to caliper piston sizing, not hose material or construction.
You can't use hose clamp-off pliers while diagnosing brake issues with SS hoses as you can with oem rubber hoses.
I dont worry about my rubber brake lines, but if I develop a problem, I'll replace as necessary and move on.

Youre correct about the price of the oem hoses. For my '14 DL1K I'm seeing 4 hose assemblies for close to $250. But the assemblies come with the junctions and fittings to make replacement a quick and professional job. And Ive yet to see a hose failure that wasnt caused by miss-routing, a collision, or lack of brake fluid maintenance. Ive never seen one hose fail, much less all fail at the same time. When it comes to brake components, I'll pay what is asked for my safety. Hopefully, with fluid maintenance I can stave off a $$$$$ ABS unit failure, as all of them Ive seen in cars were, again, due to lack of maintenance.
Then too , my preferences for my reasons. Yours may vary.
 
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