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Discussion Starter #1
Hi folks,

I was working on installing a werks basket on my 05 dl 1000 and made a mistake right away the beginning!!!
Issue 1: I drained the coolant with the bike on side stand, assumed it was good but as i removed the clutch cover all hell broke loose. Coolant started pouring out and some got in. I went ahead with and installed the basket. I am going to undo the oil drain plug tomorrow and see what comes out.
Issue 2: I had a tough time getting the pinned clutch nut off and ‘dinged’ the shaft in doing so. The hub did not slide of off easily. While reinstalling the hub there was some resistance right at the beginning of the shaft.

Questions:
Should i expect some kind of weird riding behavior because i forced the hub on the shaft?

If there is some residual coolant in the engine would that mess things up? Should i fill the oil up and flush it again?

I appreciate the advice!!



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Part of my business being successful it taking care of customers.....even beyond the clutch basket itself!

You are good! The transmission shaft is hardened steel and it is unlikely you damaged it. Even the slightest burr will cause the aluminum inner hub to come off and go back on with a bit of difficulty. But, if it went back on with less than a 10 pound hammer, it should be just fine. These are a very tight fit and every one I have worked on takes a bit of patience to get started and put into position.

Coolant getting into the crankcase cannot be prevented. How much gets in....can be lessened. As pointed out on my website, leaning the bike a bit to the right side when coolant has been drained allows the coolant trapped in the water jacket and ports to drain away. At least most of it. When you pop the clutch cover off there WILL be some coolant come out. Excess amounts should be able to get out the oil drain plug. So, make sure you remove that again to drain any trapped there. Not a bad idea to try to soak up any visible drops of coolant with paper towels. But you cannot get all of it. No worries! This small amount won't hurt the engine. Once you have the bike running and put some miles on it those few drops will evaporate away.

When doing all the testing and prototypes I would tie off the DL so it leaned a bit to the right while on the bike lift. This kept pretty much all of the coolant out. Which would speed up the process. BTW, when I was really hard into testing, I could pull the bike onto the lift and my record was 38 minutes till it restarted. Including taking the basket apart and changing things to test!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Part of my business being successful it taking care of customers.....even beyond the clutch basket itself!



You are good! The transmission shaft is hardened steel and it is unlikely you damaged it. Even the slightest burr will cause the aluminum inner hub to come off and go back on with a bit of difficulty. But, if it went back on with less than a 10 pound hammer, it should be just fine. These are a very tight fit and every one I have worked on takes a bit of patience to get started and put into position.



Coolant getting into the crankcase cannot be prevented. How much gets in....can be lessened. As pointed out on my website, leaning the bike a bit to the right side when coolant has been drained allows the coolant trapped in the water jacket and ports to drain away. At least most of it. When you pop the clutch cover off there WILL be some coolant come out. Excess amounts should be able to get out the oil drain plug. So, make sure you remove that again to drain any trapped there. Not a bad idea to try to soak up any visible drops of coolant with paper towels. But you cannot get all of it. No worries! This small amount won't hurt the engine. Once you have the bike running and put some miles on it those few drops will evaporate away.



When doing all the testing and prototypes I would tie off the DL so it leaned a bit to the right while on the bike lift. This kept pretty much all of the coolant out. Which would speed up the process. BTW, when I was really hard into testing, I could pull the bike onto the lift and my record was 38 minutes till it restarted. Including taking the basket apart and changing things to test!


Hi Terry,

Thank you for the response.
First off the bike runs and putting it into 2nd was a moment ill cherish for ever!! I just rode it around the block and will update you again in a few days.

I think i caused a ‘slight’ deformation of the shaft when i went crazy on the nut. Taking the hub off was a bigger pain than putting it back on. No hammer used. I had to pull back the hub and it would only come out a bit then i would push it back and pull again. I kept at it for about 10 attempts and finally it was out. Sliding the hub back in was one shot with a bit of force.

When I undid the oil drain plug, i had about 100 ml of coolant come out first and then the residual oil. I had cleaned up as much i could before putting the clutch together. Ill flush the oil again in a few hundred miles.

38 mins is bonkers!!! It took me an hour or so just to get the fairing out. Getting the nut out was an experience in it self. Had a skinny friend help me but we didn’t have grunt to take it off with the clutch tool and a regular wrench. Thats wen I realized the clutch tool at some point wedges itself near the mounting for my givi crashbar. Made an impact wrench of sorts when i hammered the end of my wrench to get the nut loose. Same thing while tightening it, the tool got wedged by the frame near the rear brake.

This was my first time undertaking a substantial job on my bike. Definitely feels good even with the incompetence at certain times. Now as long as everything is in one piece its only adventures ahead.

Thank you Terry for your service and this forum has been of immense help!!

Cheers!




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My "10 pound hammer" statement was of course tongue in cheek. Sounds like yours is just fine.

Now you know why I push buying the clutch hub holding tool. Used to be I would have a few customers break clutch baskets every year trying to remove them....incorrectly. The clutch hub holding tool has made that number go to near zero.

Unless you see milkiness or condensation in the oil check glass after you have ridden the bike some and it has come to full temperature a couple times, there is no real need to change/flush the oil. The amount of coolant that was actually left in the crankcase is quite small and 99% of that will evaporate.

Enjoy your "new" bike. You done well for one without a lot of experience. That you didn't have other problems tells me you paid attention to the tips and maybe the video on my website.
 

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Sure would be nice to have a cover over the clutch that was removable.

Sure is a PITA to remove the water pump and all that when working on the clutch. :serious:

I put Barnett clutch springs in the 650 last fall and thought I did a good job of getting the water out but NOOOO. Ended up flushing a gallon of oil through it. :furious:
 

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Discussion Starter #8
My "10 pound hammer" statement was of course tongue in cheek. Sounds like yours is just fine.



Now you know why I push buying the clutch hub holding tool. Used to be I would have a few customers break clutch baskets every year trying to remove them....incorrectly. The clutch hub holding tool has made that number go to near zero.



Unless you see milkiness or condensation in the oil check glass after you have ridden the bike some and it has come to full temperature a couple times, there is no real need to change/flush the oil. The amount of coolant that was actually left in the crankcase is quite small and 99% of that will evaporate.



Enjoy your "new" bike. You done well for one without a lot of experience. That you didn't have other problems tells me you paid attention to the tips and maybe the video on my website.

I definitely a noob fo thinking that you actually meant it!!
The holding tool was a life saver. I had tried my luck on my older bike with a regular clutch/flywheel holding tool off amazon. Did not work!
The video was my manual. I had tried my hand at changing the plates on my fzr 600 just to get an idea of the complexity and time involved. I also realized the importance of torque specs when i broke a spring bolt on it. Otherwise, anyone can do it if you have the right tools.
Should i be cautious for a few miles before i rip on it? Is there a break in period?


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Should i be cautious for a few miles before i rip on it? Is there a break in period?
Rip on it! It is stronger in many ways than a brand new OEM basket. No break-in at all.
 

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My "10 pound hammer" statement was of course tongue in cheek. Sounds like yours is just fine.



Now you know why I push buying the clutch hub holding tool. Used to be I would have a few customers break clutch baskets every year trying to remove them....incorrectly. The clutch hub holding tool has made that number go to near zero.



Unless you see milkiness or condensation in the oil check glass after you have ridden the bike some and it has come to full temperature a couple times, there is no real need to change/flush the oil. The amount of coolant that was actually left in the crankcase is quite small and 99% of that will evaporate.



Enjoy your "new" bike. You done well for one without a lot of experience. That you didn't have other problems tells me you paid attention to the tips and maybe the video on my website.


This is how the glass looks after a few miles. IMG_1340.jpg


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Not uncommon. But a few miles isn't going to warm the bike up enough. You have to put some miles on it, preferably at higher speeds where it is under constant load. This will bring the engine crankcase/transmission area up to operating temperature. Until then these components actually act to cool the oil and it never gets hot enough to evaporate off the stuff that should be in there.
 
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