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Discussion Starter #1
This morning I got to work and parked my bike, then decided to roll it a few feet to a better spot. I noticed a clunking noise while it rolled, several times while moving just a few feet. It was turned off and in 1st gear with the clutch pulled. If I rolled the bike back and forth, I'd hear several clunks. What could this noise be?

The chain should be lubed enough, although I have been on a bunch of dirt roads recently. It was adjusted just last week. Bike has 10k miles and has mostly been untouched besides oil changes, chain maintenance, and the 600 mile check.

I think I'm going to check the front sprocket at lunch. I can't take any pics or video on the company property, and I have plans to ride 100 miles tonight when I leave so I'm hoping there's nothing to really worry about here...

Any advice is appreciated. Thanks.
 

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Do you have a center stand? My initial reaction is the chain. Mine has gone "dry" and made a clunk noise. Once I oiled it, the noise was gone. I'd put it up on the centerstand and spin the rear tire, out of gear. You might just see a couple of tight links that aren't exactly straight in line and that will create the clunk noise. Oiling of the chain will loosen tight links and clean out the dirt from them a bit.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Do you have a center stand? My initial reaction is the chain. Mine has gone "dry" and made a clunk noise. Once I oiled it, the noise was gone. I'd put it up on the centerstand and spin the rear tire, out of gear. You might just see a couple of tight links that aren't exactly straight in line and that will create the clunk noise. Oiling of the chain will loosen tight links and clean out the dirt from them a bit.
No center stand, but I do have a rear stand coming in the mail today to prepare for changing tires. Problem is I wasn't planning on stopping home and if I did, I'd only have enough time to hop in my car and get to where I need to go.

Chain is my first thought as well and I hope it's that simple. I was thinking of picking up some chain spray and hoping that solved it and heading out for my little trip tonight, until I read about loose sprockets and things while searching for answers...
 

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another option for getting the rear wheel off the ground for this inspection is to lift or jack it from the area of the frame/swing arm on the right side where the rear axle is. Leave the bike on the kickstand and lift in this area gives you an opportunity to get the rear off the ground. BE CAREFUL though, as this is not the most stable of options, but it works in a pinch.

In the retail world, I believe they sell an item called a SnapJack. No need to buy one, but you'll see what I am talking about. You can create something like this quite easily, and if you have a co-worker help lean the bike over on the kickstand, you might not even need a snapjack.

Bottom line is, you need to get this checked before going on that ride. Yeah, I know you REALLY want to go, but spending a bit of time to check this is necessary. Once the rear tire is in the air and you can spin it, check the chain (and oil it), the sprockets to ensure tight and check those rear rubber cushions in the wheel ( see part #6, figure 64 at https://www.ronayers.com/oemparts/a/suz/506b2c29f8700231bc9563d5/rear-wheel )
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Bottom line is, you need to get this checked before going on that ride. Yeah, I know you REALLY want to go, but spending a bit of time to check this is necessary. Once the rear tire is in the air and you can spin it, check the chain (and oil it), the sprockets to ensure tight and check those rear rubber cushions in the wheel ( see part #6, figure 64 at https://www.ronayers.com/oemparts/a/suz/506b2c29f8700231bc9563d5/rear-wheel )
You really think I need to remove the rear wheel entirely? In any case, I'll have to get home 20 miles and I'll be able to dig into things tomorrow. I was just hoping to get some ideas on what it was and hopefully find out it's not an issue at all.
 

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no, you do not need to remove the rear wheel. Just get it off the ground so you can check all those items. Yeah, the rubbers are inside the wheel but you can check to see if they are making the clunk sound with the wheel off the ground. I simply added that link because I didn't know the official name of the part. Spin the rear wheel while raised off the ground is all you need for inspection of the clunk.
 

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Third or forth vote for chain. My guess is it either needs lube or if someone adjusted it recently they made it to tight.

I was lazy and brought my bike in to have my front tire installed. During inspection the shop said my chain was to loose and they could adjust it for $15 so I let them adjust it.

Chain and sprockets had about 400 miles on it. I am backing out of the driveway at home a few days later and clunk clunk clunk. I check the chain .. yup .. WAY to tight! Brought it to a touch looser than spec and noise gone.

and this is why I do most every bit of maintenance myself.
 

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Third or forth vote for chain. My guess is it either needs lube or if someone adjusted it recently they made it to tight.

I was lazy and brought my bike in to have my front tire installed. During inspection the shop said my chain was to loose and they could adjust it for $15 so I let them adjust it.

Chain and sprockets had about 400 miles on it. I am backing out of the driveway at home a few days later and clunk clunk clunk. I check the chain .. yup .. WAY to tight! Brought it to a touch looser than spec and noise gone.

and this is why I do most every bit of maintenance myself.
I did recently adjust the chain to within spec at 1" of movement. It was previously 1.5", maybe I should have left it that way? It seemed fine, but was loose according to Suzuki and I wouldn't have gone tighter if it wasn't in my manual. I mostly was just looking for something to do at the time.

At any rate, I checked at lunch and whatever the noise was is no longer noticeable. I just hear the gentle sound of the chain on the sprocket when rolling it around. So I'm a little less worried, but not much because I don't like the mystery.
 

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I mostly was just looking for something to do at the time.
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LOL .. I have been SOOOooooo guilty of doing that as well. Especially on some of the older bikes I had/have .. just looking for something to tinker with for the sake of tinkering so you my friend are not alone.

I try to remember a new mantra now and have only been marginally successful ... "You can keep fixing it until you break it."

Back off the chain a touch and you will be fine and save some wear and tear on your chain and sprockets.

My new Vee is the first new bike I have bought in some 8 years and I cant find anything to mess with so I polished the windshield and adjusted my throttle cable ... sigh .. old habits are hard to break!
 
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