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Went to do some routine maintenance today which requires draining and removing part of the cooling system.

For some time I always wondered why my reservior never changed levels and everyone once in a while, notice coolant would leak out of the thermostat case. Come to find out, I noticed some sediment buildup in the reservior tank. I went to remove the radiator-to-reservior tube and noticed it was completely plugged with this white, sandy sediment (it initially has the feel and vision of sand but when I rub it between my fingers, it begins to dissolve). I cleaned the upper and lower tubes and flushed the radiator in the sink. Didn't see much more come through which makes me wonder what's inside the pump and case.

So, what is this stuff? I searched the interwebs and some claim it to be an anti-leak additive. I flushed the system once before and just used the Prestone 50/50 mix. I notice this sediment in my truck's reservior as well.

Should I be concerned?

Also, is there a way to do a vehicle type flush on these bikes like doing so on a car? Figure get the flush kit for a car, cut the upper and lower hoses to splice in the Tee and hook it up to a garden hose while running. I don't see it really being a problem but since I like in an apartment complex, I can't come by a water tap.
 

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I can't help you in identifying the sediment, but I can share with you my way of cleaning out the cooling system. Every 2-3 years I drain all coolant and replace it with a 50/50 mix of distilled water and white vinegar. I run this solution through a couple of warmup cycles then drain and refill with Liquid Ice or another aluminum specific antifreeze.
I think I read somewhere that some Prestone antifreeze products have a leak sealing ingrediant. I know this was some years back and I am not even sure if the practice continues, but because of that and price I have always used another brand that is motorcycle specific or just plain antifreeze good for aluminum systems.
 

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The sediment is probably harmless except for the plugging factor. It may be due to the age of the antifreeze or due to different types of antifreeze mixed together. While just about all antifreeze has ethylene glycol as the base for freeze protection, there are several types of corrosion inhibitors and other chemicals that may not mix ideally, or perhaps minerals in the local tap water caused the sediment.

The vinegar flush is good; be sure to rinse completely to get all the acid out. If you have any of that sediment around, try it in some vinegar to see if it dissolves. Or just flush once or twice with clean water. Distilled water is recommended for the final mix if your local tap water has minerals that could solidify.

My choice of antifreeze is Zerex Asian Vehicle Antifreeze/Coolant. It is premixed with water, so no water need be added. Otherwise, I'd use antifreeze for any Japanese engine (Honda, Toyota, etc.) or motorcycle specific antifreeze. I think all antifreezes are compatible with aluminum radiators these days, but the corrosion inhibitor package varies to meet the engine maker's choice of internal alloys. Some of the antifreezes (Dex-Cool) use chemicals that plastify certain gasket materials. The Asian engine makers prefer an antifreeze that is free of silicates and has phosphates. Plus, the Zerex Asian stuff has 5-year corrosion inhibitors while most contain 2-year inhibitors.

An easy way to test the corrosion inhibitors is with a digital voltmeter. With a cool engine, remove the radiator cap and put one probe in the coolant not touching metal. Put the other probe on the battery negative post. If you read 0.3 volts DC or less, the corrosion inhibitors are still alive. If you read a higher voltage, your cooling system is acting like a wet cell battery galvanic cell eating away some of the metals. Flush and renew the coolant.
Galvanic cell - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

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Gotta ask this, why not use what ever Suzuki sells for their products? I frequently read that folks use their preferred potion. Is it somehow better than what the manufacturer suggests?
 

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Gotta ask this, why not use what ever Suzuki sells for their products? I frequently read that folks use their preferred potion. Is it somehow better than what the manufacturer suggests?
Just guessing, but Suzuki uses another brand of antifreeze they feel meets their needs and has an agreement to put their name on it. For example, back in the late 70s and 80s Suzuki motor oil was the same as Shell Fire and Ice. I am probabaly wrong, (and as forums go it will be proven), but I bet Suzuki has continued with Shell products, as evident from all the good posts about Rotella motor oil and its resistance to sheering.
 

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The Suzuki name on various products is not about engineering but marketing and sales. Suzuki doesn't make the fluids or most add on parts. A lot of their hardware is made by SW-Motech, Trax, Hepco & Becker, etc..
 

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why not use what ever Suzuki sells for their products?
No problem except there's no convenient dealership near me (and the multi-brand dealerships might not sell the branded products for every brand they sell), and the branded juice is only a 2-year product, while other coolants have different corrosion inhibitors good for 5 years.
 

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I can't say for sure, because modern day coolants do put all sorts of interesting compounds in the liquid, but the description you gave is the same description I would give for Calcium Carbonate deposits. There's tons of way to get calcium carbonate out of the water, but the one I'd be most tempted to assume is boiling on the metal surfaces. Every time a bubble forms, a little calcium carbonate finds itself without a home. Over time it builds up as scale, just like you'd see in a teapot.

Take some of the sediment and put it in vinegar. Calcium Carbonate will dissolve in vinegar given enough time (I can't say for your particular grain of material, but when I descale my teapot, it takes less than 30 minutes). If it dissolves, there's a decently good chance its calcium carbonate. If it doesn't, then I'm proven wrong.
 

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White Stuff...

I believe the sediment you found in your cooling system comes from the water you are using. It is common to have water that contains minerals (as cmdrrickhunter calls it calcium carbonate, or just calcium). I drain my hot water heaters in my home annually, and I always find an off-white, granular substance, that initially looks like sand but can be "dissolved" by rubbing it between your fingers. If I did not drain the hot water heaters regularly they would eventually fill up with the stuff. I recommend you make sure that if you add water to your motorcycle or auto cooling system you use distilled water and that may fix your problem.
 

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I believe the sediment you found in your cooling system comes from the water you are using. It is common to have water that contains minerals (as cmdrrickhunter calls it calcium carbonate, or just calcium). I drain my hot water heaters in my home annually, and I always find an off-white, granular substance, that initially looks like sand but can be "dissolved" by rubbing it between your fingers. If I did not drain the hot water heaters regularly they would eventually fill up with the stuff. I recommend you make sure that if you add water to your motorcycle or auto cooling system you use distilled water and that may fix your problem.
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