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Discussion Starter #1
hello My fellow VStrom Masters ,
I have oil from my oil leaking in to my rear brake pads and My rear brake does not function at all , It engages beautifully but does not stop the bike.
I am sure that there is a low of engine oil get in to it.
My replacement was around 1500 miles ago with Galfer .
I know that the safest action would be to replace them Which I am going to do.:smile2::nerd:
While doing that which areas should be cleaned form oil ? when installing new pads?
are the oily brake pads useable after cleaning and what to use to clean? is burning them on flame advised?
Thank you
Ride safe/Ride long:smile2:
 

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What's the manual state? I suspect replacing them is the safest bet... oil will absorb deeper into the pads and cleaning them won't solve this.

What's the source of the oil leak?
 

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1st, ensure the source of the oil has been corrected.

2nd, remove caliper and pads from caliper and clean up excess oil.

3rd, get some green or red scotch-brite and brake clean and de-glaze the rotor (see YouTube)

4th, brake clean the pads maybe even a few times.

5th, put it back together and see how they feel.

A set of pads are cheap in the US so I wouldn't hesitate to replace them but the above should be suitable until new pads arrive.
 

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1st, ensure the source of the oil has been corrected.

2nd, remove caliper and pads from caliper and clean up excess oil.

3rd, get some green or red scotch-brite and brake clean and de-glaze the rotor (see YouTube)

4th, brake clean the pads maybe even a few times.

5th, put it back together and see how they feel.

A set of pads are cheap in the US so I wouldn't hesitate to replace them but the above should be suitable until new pads arrive.
All this and add sanding the pads on a flat surface. Cheap fix and it usually works fine.
 
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You can also try to use a degresser to see if it will get the oily substance off.

Simple green or Royal Purple degresser.
 
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Discussion Starter #7
Thank you all, I already bought a new one to istal , then I will clean the used one as much as I can and save it for future use.
Thank you
Ride safe /Ride long
 

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Thank you all, I already bought a new one to istal , then I will clean the used one as much as I can and save it for future use.
Thank you
Ride safe /Ride long
Don't forget to clean the caliper. If you are talking about motor oil fouling the brake pads, it can have an adverse effect on the rubber boots and piston seals in caliper. Be very careful about using Brakleen on rubber parts - it will kill them. I would use something like simple green or a mild degreaser w/ a tooth brush to get rid of the oil. If by oil you mean brake fluid, nothing to worry about. In fact, when rebuilding calipers, we lube the piston w/ clean brake fluid and push it in against the rubber seal.
 

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Leaky base gasket, excess chain lube, leaky rear shock... but I'd bet rear master cylinder and/or lines and caliper.
 
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After you are sure the repair is done clean the caliper and disk, I have found that rubbing alcohol after dish soap with water does a great job but

I personally would chuck the brake pads. They are cheap enough to replace but even if the cost were a bit more ... I don't mess with stopping ability.

I think it was like 15 bucks for new pads for the rear on my other bike.
 

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A zillion years ago a friend made a hot vapor degreaser. A drum with a few coils of pipe at the top that water was circulated through. A heater element was in the base.
It heated the solvent and the vapors were stopped at the top by the water coils. the brake pads were suspended in the vapor and the solvent would wash over the brakes and drip back into the reservoir at the bottom of the device.
It worked great on the E brakes of my jeep that oozed some trans oil on them.
It's a bit over the top for the home guy but stuff like that works. The pads were clean as new after a bit. A spray can of degreaser may do the same. Be sure to wash your hands, it can be a bit caustic.
 

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A zillion years ago a friend made a hot vapor degreaser. A drum with a few coils of pipe at the top that water was circulated through. A heater element was in the base.
It heated the solvent and the vapors were stopped at the top by the water coils. the brake pads were suspended in the vapor and the solvent would wash over the brakes and drip back into the reservoir at the bottom of the device.
It worked great on the E brakes of my jeep that oozed some trans oil on them.
It's a bit over the top for the home guy but stuff like that works. The pads were clean as new after a bit. A spray can of degreaser may do the same. Be sure to wash your hands, it can be a bit caustic.
We used to use those at a commercial paint shop that I worked at a zillion years ago. Parts shipped from Japan were heavily oiled but once lowered into the solvent mist would come out sparking clean. The solvent was Trichloroethylene, which would get you high as a kite when cleaning the vats.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Bought a new set for rear( I think it is EBC , for under $40) , and installed following the directions from videos , a little tricky to set the back of it , initially same response as the one covered with oil , then after minutes of riding start acting like normal , Probably did not clean the remaining oil good enough.
The oil socked one , placed in robing alcohol for days, then cleaned , placed in the direct sun light , will clean with brake cleaner and then may sand it a little and save for future use.
Thank you
Ride safe/Ride long
 

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Lightheadedness from aromatic toxins literally makes your head lighter by destroying brain cells. We've got trillions of them, but still...
 

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Taking the cost of the cleaners used, plus the time and then all test rides related to cleaning the old pads, won't it be less expensive and more productive in just replacing them? Or is it overcoming the challenge?
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Taking the cost of the cleaners used, plus the time and then all test rides related to cleaning the old pads, won't it be less expensive and more productive in just replacing them? Or is it overcoming the challenge?
I am here to learn my bike and use the experienced advises. Other wise ,right money talks.
Ride safe/Ride long :smile2:
 

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Most "good" aerosol brake/parts cleaner is acetone. You really don't have to over think it. Unless then pads are made of sea sponge or a sham-wow the oil is not going to impregnate it significantly. A quick spray of brake cleaner or soap, water and scrub brush will get the surface oil off. If there is any residual it soon be burned off from heat created by friction.


If you don't feel safe with degreasing the stock pads simply buy new ones.
 
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