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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
a.k.a, '‘ Motorcycle Chain Lubricator Oiler Maintenance Set’

Where I got it: AliExress.com

How Long to Receive Order: 10 Days to arrive from date of order.

Price: $17.96 + $.80 paypal fee = $18. 76 (Google ‘ Motorcycle Chain Lubricator Oiler Maintenance Set’ and you may find it cheaper)

How it Works: The oiler is based on the old-style trigger dispensed oil cans, except it uses a cable and lever to work the actuator in the can and dispense oil directly on the chain. Pump the lever to apply the oil with the chain turning, then take it for a ride to work the oil around the chain.
Applying 1.jpg

China Post: Here is the package it came in along with a U-Clamp you can use to mount the oil can around a round bar. I did not need this since I used an already existing bolt on the inside of my luggage rack. Used one of the leftover 10mm nuts as a lock nut on the clamp provided to mount the applicator spout to my swingarm.
China Post w U-Clamp.jpg

Mounting:

I mounted the cable lever to my crash bar with piece of tire inner tube between the clamp and crash bar to avoid scratching. Both the cable and the lever hug the bike nicely and do not get in my way.
Lever Mount 1.jpg

Here's a shot of the can you fill with oil mounted to the inside of my luggage rack.
Can On.jpg

Here's a shot of the actuator that is inside the can. There is some assembly required when you first receive the kit. A small ball bearing fits in the bottom of a sleeve with a spring on top of it. Don't lose the ball bearing that goes in the bottom of the outer sleeve! This assembly slides over the top of a tube permanently mounted underneath the can lid. Then you thread the cable through the top lid of the can, and down through an eyelet on the sleeve assembly. Take up the slack to make sure there is spring loaded pressure, and thread the bottom of the cable through a cable anchor which has a small screw to secure it to the cable which rests underside of the eyelet. Be careful not to to fray the cable when sticking the end through the tiny hole in the cable anchor, or it can be difficult to get through. Once you have filled the can with oil, you will need to pump the lever to get air worked out and oil worked thorough the tubing and down to the tip. A warning says do not test with water. I presume this might rust inside of can ? Note: There were no instructions that came with the kit.
Actuator 2.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
Chinese Chain Luber - Review - Part 2

Here's a couple pics of how I had to mount the applicator spout to the underside of the swingarm:
Swingarm Mount 1.jpg

Swingarm Mount 2.jpg

The mount held up well on my 40 mile test ride. Rode over manhole covers and potholes to test it and it did not loosen up. When you think about it, in order for those threaded posts to loosen up, the 10mm nuts would have to get tighter. If it ever does loosen up, I would go to the hardware store and get some proper lock washers and/or nuts. But so far, it seems solid.

Here's what the chain looked like after a 40 mi. ride. I used Pennzoil 10w-40. Not sure if it circulates completely over the outside of the side plates after dropping oil down the middle of the chain rollers, but it does appear to get worked over the critical o-rings and joints where the links are pressed together. What do you think ?
Wet Chain Rear View 1.jpg

Wet Chain Rear View 2.jpg

I couldn't get a good pic of the side of the chain. Not sure, but I might need to hit the side plates with some chain lube from time to time.

Wet Chain Side.jpg

I’m not sure what Torturo or Loobman fans would think of this but,

1)You don’t have to worry about improperly adjusting the flow rate, because oil is only applied when you pump the lever. As mentioned, this oiler is based on the old trigger style oil cans, except the actuator is moved with a cable and lever.

2)Since the oil tip(spout) doest not come in direct contact with anything, it should not wear down or break off.

3) Since oil is only applied when you pump the lever, and only to the chain itself, it does not seem to soak the rear wheel, but you do need to work the lever carefully. My chain was rather dry after coming out of winter storage, so I pulled the lever a total of maybe 12 ? times; about 6 before I left for the ride and a few times on the road when I would pull over to see how things were holding up. Note: Oil did not drip out of the tip to make a mess on the floor unless you were pumping the handle.

I prefer to apply the oil with my bike on the centerstand, and the rear wheel turning so I can make sure the oil is dripping right onto the chain. You might need to twist the metal nozzle inside of the clear tubing to make sure it is dripping on the chain. Do not pull the lever too hard or the oil might squirt over the top of the chain. Slow, steady pull. Then take it for a ride.

However:

I’m not as sure at this point about the application when riding the bike, particularly in windy conditions, which might be a concern for riders not having a centerstand. I want to see the lube go right on the chain.


Might need to spray some chain lube on the outside plates from time to time, because I am not sure that those areas get coverage well when dripping oil down the cener of the chain, but the areas where the links mate together certainly do, which is critical.

Like all of these chain lubers, it provides a way to use less expensive lubricants in liquid form, rather than using sprays.

For me, it is a keeper. However, I might try something better than 10w-40. Not sure, but it might be too sticky and harbor dirt and grit, and I would rather have something that flings off dirt and grit better. I will still clean my chain with kerosene from time to time. I want to see how much more mileage I can get out of this OEM 35,499mi chain which still is only stretched to the middle marks on the axle.

The seller claimed they use these all over ‘the country’, which I presume means China.

Hope this helps.
 

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Great write up!

Question, does it make sense to have the oil squirt onto the rear sprocket just prior to where the chain and sprocket make contact? I was reading a thread recently and I think that's where the more expensive oilers were suggesting the oil placement was optimal?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Great write up!

Question, does it make sense to have the oil squirt onto the rear sprocket just prior to where the chain and sprocket make contact? I was reading a thread recently and I think that's where the more expensive oilers were suggesting the oil placement was optimal?
It might be possible to move that spout down towards that area, but you would probably waste a bit of oil on the ground as the force built from each pump of the lever to shoot it over on the sprocket.

The way it is now, I could see oil build up around the edge of the sprocket just above the teeth just from catching it from the chain.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Good to know, I like what you're doing!
My goal now is to find something better than 10w40 to use as lube.

Engine oil bonds with dirt to create a gritty paste that I can hear when turning the wheel. After I was through testing, I cleaned the chain off with Kerosene. I'm going to try chainsaw oil next. It is inexpensive and hopefully will fling off the chain at the right rate to help clean it. I want something inexpensive, sold through major retail chains, yet is effective.
 

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Bar oil (chainsaw) comes in winter (thin) and summer (thick) formulas. They might both be worth trying. I use 90w gear oil with success but always wanted to try a summer bar and gear oil mixed 50/50 for giggles.
 

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I like that, but someone I think on this forum posted about placing the drip tube right up by the front sprocket and said that it worked well without the fling, but can't find that post.
might be worth a try.
 

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I have found ATF works best in my scottoiler,

chain saw lubricant imho is too heavy viscosity, it is designed for different duty, purpose of bar oil is to lubricate the guide bar primarily and only secondarily, the sprocket
 

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My goal now is to find something better than 10w40 to use as lube.

Engine oil bonds with dirt to create a gritty paste that I can hear when turning the wheel. After I was through testing, I cleaned the chain off with Kerosene. I'm going to try chainsaw oil next. It is inexpensive and hopefully will fling off the chain at the right rate to help clean it. I want something inexpensive, sold through major retail chains, yet is effective.
Nah it self cleans better than any other lube, all I ever do on occasion is wipe my chain down with a clean or oily rag. WD40 isn't a proper chain lubricant, odds are it is dissolving/cleaning any lube from where it needs to stay. I recommend at minimum the Dupont chain saver lube, that is damn good stuff and should yield the results you're looking for. :fineprint:

I know this system is totally manual, and perhaps that is why it won't help self clean the chain and there is minimal fling off? A constant oiler at a very slow rate is the best overall solution IMHO, with zero fling there is zero clean. :wink2: I agree that chainsaw oil is likely too thick, perhaps some marine oil or 2 stroke oil might be worth trying first?
 

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Nah it self cleans better than any other lube, all I ever do on occasion is wipe my chain down with a clean or oily rag. WD40 isn't a proper chain lubricant, odds are it is dissolving/cleaning any lube from where it needs to stay. I recommend at minimum the Dupont chain saver lube, that is damn good stuff and should yield the results you're looking for. :fineprint:

I know this system is totally manual, and perhaps that is why it won't help self clean the chain and there is minimal fling off? A constant oiler at a very slow rate is the best overall solution IMHO, with zero fling there is zero clean. :wink2: I agree that chainsaw oil is likely too thick, perhaps some marine oil or 2 stroke oil might be worth trying first?
truth
wd40 is what u use to clean my chains
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
Nah it self cleans better than any other lube, all I ever do on occasion is wipe my chain down with a clean or oily rag. WD40 isn't a proper chain lubricant, odds are it is dissolving/cleaning any lube from where it needs to stay. I recommend at minimum the Dupont chain saver lube, that is damn good stuff and should yield the results you're looking for. :fineprint:

I know this system is totally manual, and perhaps that is why it won't help self clean the chain and there is minimal fling off? A constant oiler at a very slow rate is the best overall solution IMHO, with zero fling there is zero clean. :wink2: I agree that chainsaw oil is likely too thick, perhaps some marine oil or 2 stroke oil might be worth trying first?
truth
wd40 is what u use to clean my chains
I said 10w-40, as in Pennzoil, not WD40.

As for continuous flow needed, I've got over 35k mi on my chain and only spray it with Liquid Wrench L711 after every fill-up or driving in rain. I occasionally clean with Kerosene and a grunge brush.


I think part of the reason the Dupont dry was lube works is because when it does fling off, it flings off some dirt with it. I used that for years before going to Liquid Wrench Cable and Chain Lube L711, but prefer the Liquid Wrench even though it is runnier and needs to set a while after application.
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
I have found ATF works best in my scottoiler,

chain saw lubricant imho is too heavy viscosity, it is designed for different duty, purpose of bar oil is to lubricate the guide bar primarily and only secondarily, the sprocket
I will probably try ATF next if the chainsaw oil does not work.

The Pennzoil 10w-40 I tried yesterday in 50 degree F temps appeared to be thicker than the Logger's Choice chainsaw oil I loaded in the can afterwards. The chainsaw oil says it is designed to be 'tacky' to stick to the bar and chain.

From the Logger's Choice MSDS:

'LOGGER’S CHOICE HI-TAC™ bar and Chain oil is very tacky, tough, pitch dissolving
lubricant made from high viscosity base oils having the desired flow and pump-ability
properties to assure adequate lubrication over a wide range of ambient temperatures. It is
compounded with special tackiness additive to enhance its performance in any chain
lubrication application. It reduces the friction and "throw off oils" at high speeds.
'

I guess I'll find out if the above is true.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
My bad for some reason I saw WD40......yeah 10W40 isn't an overall bad choice, but I would use something a bit more viscous. I was recently turned on to the Mobil Vactra #2 machine oil, anxious to see how this compares to the Tuturo oil.

https://www.amazon.com/VACTRA-OIL-NO-2-GALLON-128OZ/dp/B00EZCPW7K/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1520791497&sr=8-2&keywords=mobil+vactra+2
$50 a gallon ????

That's like Rickland Rick suggesting you should by a barrel of it !

I guess you could mortgage your house and have a semi-truck drop a tanker load off on your front lawn.

To me, having to use an expensive lube would somewhat defeat the purpose of buying the luber. Even Liquid Wrench Cable and Chain L711 spray is pretty cheap at Menard's.
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
WD 40

I know a lot of people swear by WD 40 as a chain cleaner, but I personally would never use it for that.

The reason is because I can remember a study someone did on the VSRI forum where they took apart an O-ring chain and soaked the O-Rings in various substances for days(or weeks) and noted their observations with photos.

The WD 40 soaked O-rings showed signs of disintegration over time.

Kerosene, the very substance recommended in our owner's manuals, worked best, and even made the o-rings look a bit better. I think the periodic washings in kerosene I have given my chain over the years may be why it has held up so well.

I've actually thought about putting Kerosene in the oil can, but while it would soften the o-rings, I don't think it would stick on the chain well enough to lubricate the moving parts.
 

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Vactra #2 is around $24 to $37 per gallon depending on the source and if there is a sale, but you need to order other things with it to get the good pricing. It's an iso 68 oil, that's a 20 weight. Way oil sticks better, it's meant to be used on open surfaces like on a lathe. You can also get a iso 68 hydraulic transmission oil and add some Stp oil treatment.

But I find 20 weight oil works best for me, no matter the type.

Bar oil for chainsaws can be anything, I ran it in the past with mixed results. That oil is usually a 20 weight, I've ran the $10 a gallon bar oil from TSC and thought it was too thin, another gallon from stihl was very thick, both were summer weight.
 

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Looking at the set of pics while drinking my wine it strikes me as being exactly like an old lever action oil can. Brilliant. The cabling is hokey and probably a bit over the top.
I'd get YUGE points if I put that on my Wee and showed up at Newcomb's Ranch and showed it off.
If it gets you to keep your chain lubed it has done its job. Excellent!
 

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$50 a gallon ????

That's like Rickland Rick suggesting you should by a barrel of it !

I guess you could mortgage your house and have a semi-truck drop a tanker load off on your front lawn.

To me, having to use an expensive lube would somewhat defeat the purpose of buying the luber. Even Liquid Wrench Cable and Chain L711 spray is pretty cheap at Menard's.
Well I get it for free, but how much do you spend "total" on oil/filter change each time? :wink2: A gallon of that stuff would likely last you 2 years or more, seems pretty cheap to me.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Well I get it for free, but how much do you spend "total" on oil/filter change each time? :wink2: A gallon of that stuff would likely last you 2 years or more, seems pretty cheap to me.
Chainsaw oil is $5 gallon at Menard's right now.

Supertech ATF is $17/gal at Walmart.

Maybe one of those will work for me.

I envy you connected guys who can get this free stuff.
 
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