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Discussion Starter #1
After adjusting the chain for a little more tension, my friend says to look at the sprocket teethplacement inside the chain for rear wheel alignment. After all is tightened up and the wheel is rotated a few times, the sprocket teeth should be centered in the center of the chain. Unfortunately, the rear sprocket on mine wanted to ride the side of the chain toward thw wheel.

Anyone else check their alignment this way?

Thanks.
 

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I use that method to get it close. Then, to get it exact, I just take the bike out on some level pavement at medium speed and take my hands off the bars. If my rear tire is in perfect alignment, the bike will stay in line. If not, the bike will start to lean one way or another. If you can ride hands-off then your rear tire is in alignment.

One other point... look at where the chain is just meeting the rear sprocket when the tire is turned (i.e. when it first begins to touch the sprocket). This is where it should be centered. Once it is on the sprocket for a partial revolution, it will tend to center itself.
 

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Thanks for the response Jarlaxle. Is there a preferred speed to test alignment?

Thanks,
J
I do it at normal highway speeds of 55-70mph. That way the bike is very stable. Going no-hands at slow speed is a good way to dump it. Some others will chime in with other ways to align the rear tire, but I still prefer this way.
 

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After adjusting the chain for a little more tension
0.8" to 1.2" of slack, not tension, right? With the bike on the sidestand, lifting easy on the chain, not pressing it up.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Ok. At about 50mph, the bike leans right after a sec or two. It's not a hard lean; but lean it does.

J
 

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On a VEE this is everyday

The rear carrier assembly is week and the sprocket is pulled out of alignment

Usual cure is modified spacer

There are 100 threads google is your friend
 

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Yep with the bike in the center stand I roll the rear wheel as if the bike was rolling forward and adjust to get the rear sprocket to ride in the center of the chain.

You may notice that the sprocket may wander a little bit, but for the most part if the chain rides center, you got it.

While you got the wheel up in the air throw some lube on the chain.
 

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No Hands

I have tried riding no hands on freeway and other slower roads and find that bike lean one way or another and I can control the tendency by leaning my trunk opposite. Then I'll shift a bit in the sadlle and bike will ride straight without hands. So, how would I use your hands off test for chain alignment because if I take hands off I now presume the problem and the lean is because I am not balanced. But, the center stand in first gear idle make some sense, too.
 

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My bike has had a slight pull to the left from day one. I tried adjusting the rear wheel both directions even to extreme and it didn't correct it. I used a straight edge to get the rear sprocket aligned perfectly and that's how I'm running it. The slight pull isn't noticeable unless you take your hands off the bars.
 

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My bike has had a slight pull to the left from day one. I tried adjusting the rear wheel both directions even to extreme and it didn't correct it. I used a straight edge to get the rear sprocket aligned perfectly and that's how I'm running it. The slight pull isn't noticeable unless you take your hands off the bars.
Is that with your panniers on or off?
 

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I use that method to get it close. Then, to get it exact, I just take the bike out on some level pavement at medium speed and take my hands off the bars. If my rear tire is in perfect alignment, the bike will stay in line. If not, the bike will start to lean one way or another. If you can ride hands-off then your rear tire is in alignment.

One other point... look at where the chain is just meeting the rear sprocket when the tire is turned (i.e. when it first begins to touch the sprocket). This is where it should be centered. Once it is on the sprocket for a partial revolution, it will tend to center itself.
I recently had to remove the rear wheel in order to properly remount the rear brake caliper, and now I notice that the bike has not only developed a bit of a handlebar shake at certain speeds with my hands off the grips, it also now tends to drift off to the left. With that in mind, using the method you describe, which one of the chain tension adjusting screws should I turn to correct this? Looking at the chain on the rear sprocket, it appears to be properly aligned, but that may not necessarily mean anything, as it tends to center itself as it winds around the sprocket.
Thanks.
 

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If I remember correctly, if the front of your rear wheel is off center to the right, your bike will lean to to the right. It has been almost 6000 miles since I had to make an adjustment (that Heidenau K60 lasts!), but I am doing one this weekend. I bought a DR650 as a companion to my strom a few weeks ago and have been turning it into Frankenbike in my spare time. Tonight the new rear sprocket and tire go on and it will get it's first real ride tomorrow after being completely torn apart for the past 3 weeks. This is going to be one tricked out DR!
 
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