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The stater is mounted to the stator cover and doesn't rotate. The magnet segments are glued within the inside of the rotor, which is affixed to the crankshaft.
 

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I'm not familiar with the magnets situation a lot of people talk about, are those attached to the stator, or the casing that the stator is in? If it's my magnets that are loose, do I have to glue them or something or will replacing my stator be the fix? My hunch is that no matter what my stator is probably bad by now, regardless of the root cause.

1) what route for which stator to get? OEM? Where's the best place to get it?

2) If I replace it, will I also have to JB weld the magnets or is there another fix for the magnet issue that might be in there?

3) Should I also get a different R/R (series??) - these just looked like a lot more $$. :(

4) Was hoping to do the stator replacement myself to save the shop rate... a couple of friends have done it on their MX bikes, so I thought that should be enough to get us by along with the videos/tutorials.

Cheers, hope I get to actually ride this season!
If you check it in time, the stator could still be ok. But in more cases than not, it won't be. I think your voltage readings indicate more than just the magnets. I do also think the magnets migrating together are very hard on the stator and cause failures of the stator.

No one stocks the rotors or stators. So ordering online from partzilla.com or other online sources will probably net the best price. Partzilla Prices See if your dealer will match. If rotor is caught in time, there is a JB Weld fix for it. I personally would do the JB Weld fix to a brand new rotor as well.

I would not go the new Regulator/Rectifier route just yet. It does seem like there is some merit to them, but it is still not proven that they eliminate failures either.

Swapping out the stator is a very easy job. Pay attention to how you route the wires so they are back where the factory routing was. Swapping the rotor can be a real bastard of a job! Simply because it does NOT want to come loose from the crank! Takes an M14 x 1.5 bolt to get it off. Air impact is best. Cussing it doesn't seem to help. At first, but later it does make all the difference. BUT...the rotor can be repaired on the bike without removing it if the magnets are in good shape. Get a new magneto cover gasket too. Take care removing the magneto cover, there are some starter gear shafts/bearings that love to fall out.
 

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If your stator is indeed in the process of toasting itself: I wouldn't spend the money (and wait) for a new Suzuki stator, since they've burned out so often. I've been through 2 in less than 2 years of riding.

Get your existing stator rebuilt by Custom Rewind. It's much cheaper. More reliable, too, if my experience is any indication.

Possibly faster, too, as they get stators done & shipped out within a few days, vs. sometimes weeks-long backorders on Suzuki parts.
 

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If you check it in time, the stator could still be ok. But in more cases than not, it won't be. I think your voltage readings indicate more than just the magnets. I do also think the magnets migrating together are very hard on the stator and cause failures of the stator.

No one stocks the rotors or stators. So ordering online from partzilla.com or other online sources will probably net the best price. Partzilla Prices See if your dealer will match. If rotor is caught in time, there is a JB Weld fix for it. I personally would do the JB Weld fix to a brand new rotor as well.

I would not go the new Regulator/Rectifier route just yet. It does seem like there is some merit to them, but it is still not proven that they eliminate failures either.

Swapping out the stator is a very easy job. Pay attention to how you route the wires so they are back where the factory routing was. Swapping the rotor can be a real bastard of a job! Simply because it does NOT want to come loose from the crank! Takes an M14 x 1.5 bolt to get it off. Air impact is best. Cussing it doesn't seem to help. At first, but later it does make all the difference. BUT...the rotor can be repaired on the bike without removing it if the magnets are in good shape. Get a new magneto cover gasket too. Take care removing the magneto cover, there are some starter gear shafts/bearings that love to fall out.
Thanks, I will stick to the stator hunch for now then... trouble is getting it to a garage that I can keep it apart for a week or two. Especially if I get my current one re-wound like DesertBike mentioned.

If your stator is indeed in the process of toasting itself: I wouldn't spend the money (and wait) for a new Suzuki stator, since they've burned out so often. I've been through 2 in less than 2 years of riding.

Get your existing stator rebuilt by Custom Rewind. It's much cheaper. More reliable, too, if my experience is any indication.

Possibly faster, too, as they get stators done & shipped out within a few days, vs. sometimes weeks-long backorders on Suzuki parts.
 

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If your stator is indeed in the process of toasting itself: I wouldn't spend the money (and wait) for a new Suzuki stator, since they've burned out so often. I've been through 2 in less than 2 years of riding.

Get your existing stator rebuilt by Custom Rewind. It's much cheaper. More reliable, too, if my experience is any indication.

Possibly faster, too, as they get stators done & shipped out within a few days, vs. sometimes weeks-long backorders on Suzuki parts.
Desert, how much do they charge?? Looks like they have no web presence at the moment, and I'll have to wait till Monday to try and get through to them on the phone.
 

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Desert, how much do they charge?? Looks like they have no web presence at the moment, and I'll have to wait till Monday to try and get through to them on the phone.
I paid $85 for the rewind and $25 for expedited shipping, so $110 total. I think $15 is the normal shipping charge (UPS Ground).

Should be the same rate for your '06 Vee stator, which is nearly identical to that on the '07 (slightly different part numbers).

Correct, Custom Rewind has no Web presence. Phone is the way to get in touch.
 

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Desert, how much do they charge?? Looks like they have no web presence at the moment, and I'll have to wait till Monday to try and get through to them on the phone.
I paid $85 for the rewind and $25 for expedited shipping, so $110 total. I think $15 is the normal shipping charge (UPS Ground).

Should be the same rate for your '06 Vee stator, which is nearly identical to that on the '07 (slightly different part numbers).

Correct, Custom Rewind has no Web presence. Phone is the way to get in touch.
Wow that's super reasonable! Time to rip it out then and see how bad the damage is! I'll be calling them on Monday. Thank you!
 

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trouble is getting it to a garage that I can keep it apart for a week or two.
How long would it take to drive from the garage to a place where you can store the bike for a week or so (e.g. home)?

It is certainly possible to run the bike without a functioning charging system... for a short while. If your battery is in full working order, fully charged, and if you shut down non-essentials (like lights), the calculations I've seen here suggest that you should be able to run the bike for at least half an hour and possibly quite a bit longer until the battery runs out.

So after you take out the stator, you can just button everything up again and ride home, assuming that home is not more than half an hour away.

I don't normally recommend this, but it may just be the last part to complete your logistics puzzle.
 

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How long would it take to drive from the garage to a place where you can store the bike for a week or so (e.g. home)?

It is certainly possible to run the bike without a functioning charging system... for a short while. If your battery is in full working order, fully charged, and if you shut down non-essentials (like lights), the calculations I've seen here suggest that you should be able to run the bike for at least half an hour and possibly quite a bit longer until the battery runs out.

So after you take out the stator, you can just button everything up again and ride home, assuming that home is not more than half an hour away.

I don't normally recommend this, but it may just be the last part to complete your logistics puzzle.
I did just this and got it to a friends garage 25min away today... will be removing the stator tomorrow night to see what it looks like.
 

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Here's the result. Stator doesn't look bad to me, but maybe a little on one pole? I think I am just going to pre-emptively send it in to be re-wound for piece of mind.

Magnets are definitely off...so I will JB weld them. Any particular order they go in (I took them out to de-grease), or the exact gap between them?

https://imgur.com/gallery/LUzD14S
 

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Here's the result. Stator doesn't look bad to me, but maybe a little on one pole? I think I am just going to pre-emptively send it in to be re-wound for piece of mind.

Magnets are definitely off...so I will JB weld them. Any particular order they go in (I took them out to de-grease), or the exact gap between them?

https://imgur.com/gallery/LUzD14S
Yup, that's classic Suzuki self-burning stator. You caught it early enough that there's still some charging happening. That's about what mine looked like when I sent it to Custom Rewind last December.

As for the magnets...just make sure you keep them in the same order they're in now, so that they are alternating polarities (N-S-N-S etc.). I marked mine with Sharpie to make sure I didn't mix them up.

The rotor magnet fix is detailed in another thread that I'm too lazy/tired to link right now, but if you dig around this forum (or look at my post history) you'll probably find it. 0.25" tile spacers and JB Weld are involved. It's a surprisingly simple (and usually successful) fix. Just go slowly and carefully so you don't break a magnet, or mix them up.
 

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Yup, that's classic Suzuki self-burning stator. You caught it early enough that there's still some charging happening. That's about what mine looked like when I sent it to Custom Rewind last December.

As for the magnets...just make sure you keep them in the same order they're in now, so that they are alternating polarities (N-S-N-S etc.). I marked mine with Sharpie to make sure I didn't mix them up.

The rotor magnet fix is detailed in another thread that I'm too lazy/tired to link right now, but if you dig around this forum (or look at my post history) you'll probably find it. 0.25" tile spacers and JB Weld are involved. It's a surprisingly simple (and usually successful) fix. Just go slowly and carefully so you don't break a magnet, or mix them up.
What's the stator supposed to look like? Because mine certainly doesn't look toasted...

Magnets. Oops. I knew there was an order! I had already taken them out, but I can use another magnet or themselves to test to make sure they are alternating?? :confused:

Oh, tile spacers are perfect... I'll dig more for that thread.
 

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The only way to tell whether your stator is bad, is to test it with an ohmmeter (resistance test). There should be a specific resistance between each pair of wires, and from each individual wire to ground. The service manuals has all the details.

If the stator doesn't pass the resistance test, then it's definitely bad. But even a stator that passes the resistance test might have a problem. That's because of the nature of the problem.

What Suzuki (or their stator manufacturer) did, was wind the stator and then use some hot glue/wax to hold the three exit wires into place. They then immersed the whole shebang in epoxy and let it cure. The result is that the hot glue/wax is now underneath the epoxy.

When the stator is then subjected to hot engine (oil) temperatures, the hot glue/wax melts, leaving that bit of the wiring exposed and unsupported, and able to rub against each other under vibration. This will eventually wear away the insulation and cause a short. But depending on how exactly the vibration happened and how far the abrasion process progressed, you may not be able to detect this short with the stator static on the bench.

So even a stator that bench-tests as good, may have this hidden internal problem.

What you do know at this state is that your magnets have definitely migrated, and that your stator, upon visual inspection, doesn't look too bad. What I would do is first JB-Weld the magnets into place (as said earlier, with alternating polarity, and using a tile spacer to get the spacing even). I would also bench-test the stator. If the stator passes the resistance test I would not, at this time and without further information, start an expensive rebuild of the stator. I would ride the bike, keeping a close watch on the voltages, and only then decide whether a stator rebuild would be in order.
 

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What's the stator supposed to look like? Because mine certainly doesn't look toasted...

Magnets. Oops. I knew there was an order! I had already taken them out, but I can use another magnet or themselves to test to make sure they are alternating?? :confused:

Oh, tile spacers are perfect... I'll dig more for that thread.
Maybe it's just the lighting, but the one pole near 9 o'clock in your second photo, and just right of 12 o'clock in the third photo, does look a bit blackened.

Now, that doesn't by itself necessarily mean your stator is on its way out - it's the voltages with the engine running that make me think that. Definitely go ahead and do the whole procedure outlined in the shop manual (voltage on each leg, resistance of each leg, etc.) to diagnose the stator.

As you say, not a big deal to straighten out the rotor magnet polarity. They just have to alternate & be fairly evenly spaced.

I can't readily say what the migrated magnets would do to a stator, but it can't be good. I can say that I had a new Suzuki stator burn itself out, even with rotor magnets firmly in the correct positions, and even with an upgraded Shindengen R/R. So I tend to believe the above explanation re: why the factory stators burn out.
 

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Would be nice if the new 1000 rotor could/can be put on the first gens......no magnets to shift and break. ;)
 

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UPDATE :confused::confused::confused:

I installed my "new" rewound stator from Custom Rewind in Birmingham, AL today. Re-assembled, plugged in, new seal, no extra parts left over - haha. Filled oil, did continuity test (all three matched, 0.7ohms??) and fired it up. Battery jumped absolutely none at all (brand new battery off the charger/tender). Unplugged the three-wire plug from the stator while the bike was running and checked voltage at idle. Only about 4v-6v. Almost no increase when throttle is increased up to 5k rpm. All accessories were off.

What have I done?? :crying2::crying2::crying2::crying2:

Does this mean I royally effed up the magnet fix? I was very vigilant in checking the polarities when putting them back in, but who knows... there's always a chance they could be wrong. And as far as I know there is no way of getting those out now that they are JB welded in there.

It was too damn hot today in my buds garage, but I will go back and re-check the stator from the plug as well as the R/R, but that little voltage to me sounds like I screwed it up somehow. The rewind from AL looked great and they have a great reputation, so I don't think it'd be the stator itself?? I can call Kirk just to check and see if he has a hunch too.
 

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Volt meter set to AC volts?

Cheers Tom R
 
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If you need to check the polarity of the magnets, any magnet will do. Maybe you've got an old compass lying around? Maybe even the magnetic compass in your phone would work. Maybe one of these clickety balls that were all the rage a few (actually quite a few) years ago? Just hold it inside the rotor, as close as you can to one of the rotor magnets and you should see or feel an alternating pull/push when going from one magnet to the other.

But the very first thing to check would indeed be if you've got the multimeter set correctly. Resistance requires Ohms (and they look good). Raw output from the stator is AC voltage (should be ~70V AC when running at 3000 rpm, but if your multimeter is set to DC it will show near-zero). R/R output is DC voltage (should be 14+ when running at 3000 rpm).

And as far as I know there is no way of getting those out now that they are JB welded in there.
Supposedly JB Weld (the regular kind, not the heat-resistant kind) is only rated to about 260C continuously, and 316C for 10 minutes. So if you manage to find an over that goes up to 300C or more, and leave it in there for a while (I would suggest 30 minutes at least), JB Weld should become soft enough to be removed. I'm not going to try this myself, but may I suggest you wear a decent pair of welders gloves if you attempt this?

You'll also need to remove the rotor from the engine. That's been bolted on pretty tight. You'll need an impact gun to get it loose. Let's hope you got the polarity right though...
 

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If you need to check the polarity of the magnets, any magnet will do. Maybe you've got an old compass lying around? Maybe even the magnetic compass in your phone would work. Maybe one of these clickety balls that were all the rage a few (actually quite a few) years ago? Just hold it inside the rotor, as close as you can to one of the rotor magnets and you should see or feel an alternating pull/push when going from one magnet to the other.

But the very first thing to check would indeed be if you've got the multimeter set correctly. Resistance requires Ohms (and they look good). Raw output from the stator is AC voltage (should be ~70V AC when running at 3000 rpm, but if your multimeter is set to DC it will show near-zero). R/R output is DC voltage (should be 14+ when running at 3000 rpm).



Supposedly JB Weld (the regular kind, not the heat-resistant kind) is only rated to about 260C continuously, and 316C for 10 minutes. So if you manage to find an over that goes up to 300C or more, and leave it in there for a while (I would suggest 30 minutes at least), JB Weld should become soft enough to be removed. I'm not going to try this myself, but may I suggest you wear a decent pair of welders gloves if you attempt this?

You'll also need to remove the rotor from the engine. That's been bolted on pretty tight. You'll need an impact gun to get it loose. Let's hope you got the polarity right though...
Could have been on DC when I checked... was flustered at the time. My main tell is on the dash where my bike voltage meter is. That said 12.4 at rest, and didn't move a bit when the bike started or when up at 5k RPMs.

I had all of the magnets out and tested them against each other, rotating them as needed so they each repelled the one next to it, every other. So when I put the next one in, if I hovered it above the one/s next to it, it would repel.
 
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