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Discussion Starter #1
How many of you out there change your own tires? If you do, do you balance them yourselves as well?
 

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I do. In fact, I just changed the rear tire on my Super Tenere a couple days ago.

If you want to try it yourself, this video may help. It helped me a lot back when I decided to start changing my own tires instead of paying someone to do it. I think I've changed something like 15 tires now, using the techniques described in the video.


I balance my own tires. I bought a Marc Parnes balancer and use a homemade jig made from 2'x4"s, but it can also be done by putting the axle in the wheel, and propping the ends of the axle up on a couple jackstands.

These photos show the jig clamped in my old Black and Decker Workmate, and also how the Marc Parnes Balancer is attached.


 

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I have been changing and balancing (with a basic static balancer) my tires for many years without any problems. BUT somehow I could not manage to spoon on a set of Battle Wings; probably a combination of the sidewall being too stiff and me being too old and too stiff :wink2:
I now have a Michelin on the back, which went on without any problems.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Yeah, right on. I have been eye balling those same bead breakers. They always come up in my searches. The ones I have for my dirt bikes aren't the best.
I have changed a bunch of dirt bike tires and I have a Tusk truing stand that I have used to re-spoke some dirt bike wheels, I've just never balanced a street tire on it.
 

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I had a BW-502 defeat me once also. I finally had to take it to the shop. It was back when I first started changing my own tires, and I think my technique was lacking more than it was the tire itself.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I have been changing and balancing (with a basic static balancer) my tires for many years without any problems. BUT somehow I could not manage to spoon on a set of Battle Wings; probably a combination of the sidewall being too stiff and me being too old and too stiff :wink2:
I now have a Michelin on the back, which went on without any problems.
Lol, that is one of my concerns...my time vs. money, and if I even wanted to deal with a stiff problem sidewall.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I do. In fact, I just changed the rear tire on my Super Tenere a couple days ago.

If you want to try it yourself, this video may help. It helped me a lot back when I decided to start changing my own tires instead of paying someone to do it. I think I've changed something like 15 tires now, using the techniques described in the video.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dAKIuSjPXxA&t=181s

I balance my own tires. I bought a Marc Parnes balancer and use a homemade jig made from 2'x4"s, but it can also be done by putting the axle in the wheel, and propping the ends of the axle up on a couple jackstands.

These photos show the jig clamped in my old Black and Decker Workmate, and also how the Marc Parnes Balancer is attached.


Thanks man, good video. I've been doing dirt bike tires so I know the process just never did a street tire. What tire did you put on? brand/model?
 

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I went most of my motorcycling life without changing my own tires. I tired it once on a Road King, failed miserably, and gave up for a few years. However, once I started putting 10-12 thousand miles a year on a bike, it was a skill I needed to acquire. It was just too much of a pain in the ass to take a tire off, drive it to the shop, drop it off, and then have to come back a day later to pick it up. The price itself wasn't too bad, but the inconvenience was. Now, if I'd taken the whole bike to the shop, they'd have dinged me at least a hundred bucks to change a tire. That adds up if you change a few tires a year. So eventually economics won out over laziness, and I acquired the skill.

I'm not fast; it takes me a couple hours to take the tire off the bike, change it, remount it, and clean up. But I'd have that much time invested if I had to take it to a shop and then go back and get it, so I'm willing to spend a couple hours getting dirty.
 

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Thanks man, good video. I've been doing dirt bike tires so I know the process just never did a street tire. What tire did you put on? brand/model?
I've used mostly Shinko 705s for the past few years, with the occasional Battlewing thrown in. The Shinko is my favorite; it always goes on the rim without a brutal fight. I'm even able to set the bead using just your basic cheapie 12 volt air compressor. Shinko 705s are a great all around adventure tire; they're cheap, they do well on pavement and gravel, and they stick well in the wet. If they have a downside, it's that the rear only lasts me about 5000-5500 miles (but I'm a big guy and I ride a lot of loaded two-up touring).
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I've used mostly Shinko 705s for the past few years, with the occasional Battlewing thrown in. The Shinko is my favorite; it always goes on the rim without a brutal fight. I'm even able to set the bead using just your basic cheapie 12 volt air compressor. Shinko 705s are a great all around adventure tire; they're cheap, they do well on pavement and gravel, and they stick well in the wet. If they have a downside, it's that the rear only lasts me about 5000-5500 miles (but I'm a big guy and I ride a lot of loaded two-up touring).
Well said in the post previous to this, didn't want to quote both. Makes a lot of sense for sure. Thanks for the notes on the Shinko 705. That is what I am thinking. On the fence between that and the Scout K60. Either way I don't want the expense either.

Good info to have on sidewall stubborness too.
 

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BUT somehow I could not manage to spoon on a set of Battle Wings;
I had a BW-502 defeat me once also.
and me. never had such problems, lots of scratches on my rim before it was done. I went back to the TW after that.
Only shop around is 30 round trip and it probably requires 2 trips.
 

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I've used mostly Shinko 705s for the past few years, with the occasional Battlewing thrown in. The Shinko is my favorite; it always goes on the rim without a brutal fight. I'm even able to set the bead using just your basic cheapie 12 volt air compressor. Shinko 705s are a great all around adventure tire; they're cheap, they do well on pavement and gravel, and they stick well in the wet. If they have a downside, it's that the rear only lasts me about 5000-5500 miles (but I'm a big guy and I ride a lot of loaded two-up touring).
705's for me too. Changing the tires is fairly easy once you get the hang of it. Seat the bead with a small compressor. I balance on two overturned Home Depot buckets with the axle and use stick on weights. Bike rides smooth as silk.

NB - 705's whine at 50mph, but it's not terrible.
 

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For around 20 years changed all mine on basement floor with tire irons and a breezer tool. What should have been a so easy one had me take one to a shop for first time. A 21 street tire.All most like a pedal power tire but I pinched two tubes in a row on it! Did a few more after watching them use powder and a little blow up was a big help.Still do a few but old hands and joints may hurt more the day after even if feel fine the day its done. About every thing that way since over 70!:crying2:
My BNL has a new HF changer and street rod builder friend that made my side boxes has one now.So make try more now that better tools close? When older lots of things not as easy!:frown2:
 
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