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I plan on changing my own tires from here on out. I plan on using Shinko 804 805 and I know that they tend to wear out and around 5,000 miles on the rear. I simply can't afford to bring them in to the dealer so I'm going to pick up a bead breaker as well as a manual tire balancer. Is there anything that I should be aware of when changing the tires on my vstrom. I pulled plenty of rims on Harleys and I also see that there is an ABS ring going around the rim. Thoughts?
 

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My brother and I did mine a couple weeks ago. With the right tools and two sets of hands it wasn't that hard. He is a mechanic and he said the most common mistake is not seating the bearings properly when reinstalling.
 

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My brother and I did mine a couple weeks ago. With the right tools and two sets of hands it wasn't that hard. He is a mechanic and he said the most common mistake is not seating the bearings properly when reinstalling.
What bearings? Wheel bearings? Unless you replaced them too I don't understand why you need to "seat" the existing bearings... I do my own tires as well, never needed to touch my wheel bearings at all during new tire installation..
 

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^ same here :confused:

I've been changing my own tires since 09, never reseated any bearings... maybe I'm one of the one's he's talking about :green_lol:
 

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I have done all my tire changes myself with the simplest of tools. Nothing special about the Wee or Vee2 wheels. Take a little care and you might not even scratch the rims.

I use a square made from 2x4 to support the wheel and a 2x4 block nailed to a beam as a leverage point for my 2x4 bead breaker. Leverage is the key.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I have done all my tire changes myself with the simplest of tools. Nothing special about the Wee or Vee2 wheels. Take a little care and you might not even scratch the rims.

I use a square made from 2x4 to support the wheel and a 2x4 block nailed to a beam as a leverage point for my 2x4 bead breaker. Leverage is the key.
I definitely plan on using two-by-fours. I have the spoons in the rim protector but has anyone tried the zip tie method? I was looking at that online and it sure seems simple enough.
 

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Save your money on the wheel balancer. Especially with tires like the 804/805 as they wear a bit funny and that would influence balance during the life of the tire. I have a complete tire balancing system. Once in a while I will use it, most of the time I don't. If there is a dot of color on the tire, locate that as near the valve stem as possible. If you do have a vibration, and you are sure it is the tire, it is more likely a problem with the tire being out of round or having a problem with a belt than being out of balance.

I know I will get instructed after this post about how important tire balancing is. How much improvement tire balancing beads give. So be it. I have learned better. I consider balancing aids put in through the valve stem to be snake oil and of no value beyond the placebo effect.
 

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I recently bought the harbor freight motorcycle tire changer adapter and LOVE IT. It was on sale for less than $40 delivered and it is worth 4x that. I still use the spoons and just use the HF adapter as a means to hold the wheel, but it makes it so much easier than wrestling it on the 2x4's and such.
 

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I recently bought the harbor freight motorcycle tire changer adapter and LOVE IT. It was on sale for less than $40 delivered and it is worth 4x that. I still use the spoons and just use the HF adapter as a means to hold the wheel, but it makes it so much easier than wrestling it on the 2x4's and such.
I plan on going to Harbor Freight today to pick up their bead breaker. You say there's an adapter?
 

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The Harbor Freight motorcycle "adaptor" is used in conjunction with the Harbor Freight tire changing stand for car and trailer tires. Sits on top of it. Works quite well to hold the tire, but I still use spoons to remove and replace the tires.
 

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^^^^^ what he said...

I don't have the HF changing stand/base. I ended up welding a 2" post onto the motorcycle adapter so I could put it in my 2" receiver that I have in my floor. Also, the shaft that they supply to go through the center of the wheel doesn't fit. Like was mentioned, it works great to hold the wheel while you spoon a tire on and off, but thats about it.
 

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Also, unless you have other uses for the bead breaker, I'd just pick up a couple 6" c-clamps. They will work just fine, and take up less room.
 

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This is all I use to break the bead (well, this and a rubber mallet). It's a Motion Pro Bead Popper. Lube up the sidewall with dish soap, then a few times around the rim with the wedge and the bead comes loose. Its more labor intensive than some of the other methods, but it's cheap (twenty bucks) and it doesn't take up any room in the garage.

I either set the wheel on the new tire when I'm changing it, or on a couple chunks of two by four, to keep the brake rotors from being damaged. The old tire came off and the new one went on just using spoons.

This is one of the better Youtube videos I watched on how to change the tire. I used the techniques in the video, and the process went very smoothly. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dAKIuSjPXxA

I was able to set the bead using 12 volt compressor (the kind you carry in your trunk to inflate your tires) that I've had since the 80's.

I balance mine because it seems like something you should do, but one of these days I'm just going to skip it and see how it works out. The only thing stopping me is that it can be a pain to remount the wheel on my Super Tenere (matching the splines up on the driveshaft while keeping the hub together can be a real acrobatic act), so I'd hate to do it twice in one day if it turned out that the unbalanced tire should have been balanced.
 

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What bearings? Wheel bearings? Unless you replaced them too I don't understand why you need to "seat" the existing bearings... I do my own tires as well, never needed to touch my wheel bearings at all during new tire installation..
I'm quite sure he meant bead. If a tire has been stored improperly the sides can pinch together making it difficult to seat the bead properly. Use a ratchet tie down strap around the circumference to squeeze the sidewalls out to ensure a good seal when inflating. Leave the valve stem core out because you want to inflate initially to at least 50% more pressure to ensure the bead sets. Then remove the chuck and while the air is rushing out put the stem in and inflate to spec.
 

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This is the one maintenance item I haven't bothered taking on myself so all this advice is good.
On the other hand, the tyre place I use does free fitting. It mightn't really be free but I couldn't find the tyres cheaper anywhere else anyway.
 

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I didn't bother with changing my own until recently, when I realized I was putting tires on my bike about three times a year. My local shop charged $35.00 to do it off the bike, plus the inconvenience of sometimes having to leave the wheel overnight. It seemed like one of those skills that, if you're going to ride a lot, you should know how to do, so I gave it a whirl. It wasn't as bad as I expected.
 
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