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I am trying to decide if I want to change the Wee Strom tires myself. They are the original tires on it now and I am going with the Bridgestone Battlewings front and back. I change dirt bike tires all the time and have many sizes of tire irons and an air compressor. I plan to use Dyna Beads for balancing. I have never changed a tubeless street bike tire. Is it easier or hard than a 18" rear knobby? The local price to get a tire changed (wheel off the bike) is $30.00 per wheel. I have watched the videos and it looks OK but wanted some guidance. Go for it or pay for it???
 

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I did mine and had never changed a Motorcycle tire in my life. One thing I did do is use large "zip" ties to wrap around the tire and hold the beads close together. That and Pledge(r) as a lube and I was amazed at how easy they slid on the wheels. Worst part was breaking the beads on the original tires. Heck, I even did the front twice when I initially mounted it backwards (per tire rotation arrow on tire). For me, $60 could be spent on anything else but for others it's worth it. Since I got great mileage out of the factory tires I replaced the rear with the same and used an Anakee 2 on the front to just try it out.

Oh yeah, I also used Dyna Beads and have had no balance issues.

Good luck.

Rick
 

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If you have proper tools to do it like bed breaker, tire irons, pledge or soapy water I don't see why not . I saved myself some $$$$. At the end the satisfaction of accomplishing this task by yourself is priceless.
 

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Go for it.

Three tire irons are the ticket. They're easy to balance with weights using the axle and jack stands. Masking or painters tape to hold the weights until you get it right.
 

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As it happens, I just finished doing exactly that, and with Bridgestone Battle Wings no less! If you change dirt bike tires you should have no real problem. Breaking the beads loose is a bit harder, or was for me, but the rest of it was fairly smooth sailing. What's really cool is not having to worry about pinching any tubes while you put the new ones on... :)
 

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Since you have the dirt bike tire experience, these tires are not a challenge. (I can relate, having changed dozens of dirt bike tires over the years) The front tire is simply a piece of cake-use it for the warm up exercise. The rear is not a big deal either- maybe, compare it to a stiff sidewall tire with a heavy duty tube on a cool day. The rear is a little weird because the beads want to be spread out.

Seating the beads- just apply some soapy water and hit them with the air hose.

Something you will want, are those rim protectors. I bought a couple of pairs from Rocky Mountain MC (the Tusk brand). These protect the black rims from scratching.

To break the bead, place the wheel & tire assy on top of a couple of 2x4s. Use a bottle jack and something sorta solid to push against. I use the pickup's receiver hitch. Place the jack near the rim and squash the tire down. You probably will have to push on different spots (rotate the tire a couple-few times) before the bead pops loose.

Balancing... What RichardD says.

The whole process should take you less than an hour- about the same time you would spend just to drop off and pick up the wheels at the shop.

Good luck with it! :thumbup:
 

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Same here as others, I've been changing dirt bike tubed tires for 40 years so will definitely try it myself when I need to do the first tire change. V-Strom will be my first bike with tubeless tires that I need to change. I've seen the zip tire method of changing for years but never had the need to try. I might be tempted to try this method just for kicks.

Google "zip tie motorcycle tire" and you'll find a bunch of videos on it. This one is funny, "Hillbilly Tar Change" and even is with a V-strom wheel I believe.
How to change a motorcycle tire - the alternative method - YouTube

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Try it. It isn't that difficult, and gets MUCH easier after you do it a few times (and learn to use a lubricant correctly). Also: dynabeads work! ...I don't understand it, but they do. They can be re-used, and eliminate the balancing hassle.

Buy three tire irons, rim protectors, and a big freakin C-clamp (to break the bead) and you will save a TON of money over the years.
 

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Same here as others, I've been changing dirt bike tubed tires for 40 years so will definitely try it myself when I need to do the first tire change. V-Strom will be my first bike with tubeless tires that I need to change. I've seen the zip tire method of changing for years but never had the need to try. I might be tempted to try this method just for kicks.

Google "zip tie motorcycle tire" and you'll find a bunch of videos on it. This one is funny, "Hillbilly Tar Change" and even is with a V-strom wheel I believe.
How to change a motorcycle tire - the alternative method - YouTube

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I'm glad I watched that video because it convinced me more than ever that when it's time for new tires I will remove the front and rear wheels and take them to the shop and pay someone to change the tires for me. $17/tire locally for me. :thumbup: A few years ago I changed the front and rear tires out 100% by myself on a '05 Roadstar Warrior just to prove to myself that I could do it. NEVER AGAIN. :green_lol:
 

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Discussion Starter #10
OK, I am convinced to do it myself. I have lots a good quality (motion pro) tire irons of varing sizes and I have the rim protectors and lots of windex or soapy water and also a bead breaker now I just need the tires. They will come after I get back from vacation. Thanks for the words of wisdom and guidance.
 

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Easy cheesy lemon breezy

Shoot yeah, saves tons-o-money doing it yourself. Paying $40 to $60 bucks for someone to scratch up your rims is redonkulous. Takes about 30 minutes per tire, which is probably less time than you'd spend taking the bike, or just the wheels, to a shop. I've always done all my bikes so here's a few tidbits I've figure out the hard way over 30+ years of busting my knuckles on dirt and street bikes.

1- Before beginning, in the winter I place both new tires in front of an electric floor heater for about 30 minutes. In the summer, sit them out in the sun for an hour or so. Makes them MUCH MUCH easier to work with.
2- Others will freak (here come the replies!) but I use WD 40. Soak the bead liberally and let it sit for about 10 minutes. Get a Motion Pro bead breaker (the blue one that looks like a big ice scraper) and tap, tap, tap (firm, but don't slam) the head with a hammer, working your way around the tire. As you tap you'll begin to see the bead working downward and after about two trips around, the bead will drop into the center of the rim. Repeat on the other side. Don't stress about the WD 40. It wipes off easily when you're finished, and any residual will evaporate away over night. Cant even tell you used it and I've never any issues.
3- Stack your new tires, then your old tires, under the wheel you're working on. Keeps from scratching up the wheel on the concrete garage floor or from bending a rotor. This also gets the tire up higher which is easier on the back and knees.
4- Get 3 or 4 tire irons. I use the Motion Pro spoons with large plastic handles. They're a good 12" long and give mucho leverage. Except for the tip, I wrap them in duct tape which keeps from scratching or chipping the rim. You need to use grace and not brute force and keep the opposite side of the tire down in the center of the wheel else you'll tear the tires bead. A large C clamp from Harbor Freight works great, or just use your knee. Again, use plenty-o WD 40. It helps a lot....

I've never tried dyna beads but never felt a need to. I've never had any balance issues and I regularly hit 100 mph...... Most tires will have a dot or a small circle imprinted very faintly somewhere on the sidewall. This is the heavy spot of the tire, so just line it up with the valve stem (which is the light spot on your rim) and waaaaa laaaaa, no balance issues!

When you do your tires it's also a good time to check wheel bearings. I'll gently pry out the seals and then work some fresh lithium WP grease into the bearings. I usually replace the seals once a year and you can get them on-line from bikebandit.com for like $7 each. Cheap insurance.

Hope this helps.
 

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I'm just the opposite of all/most here. Just sold my Harbor Freight changer with nifty No-Mar rim holders and mount/dismount bar along with a Marc Panes balancer. The last go-around with my Battle Wings did it. Maybe I'm getting old, but paying $30 a tire to not get intimate with and cuss at new tires has now become worth it for me.
 

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I'm just the opposite of all/most here. Just sold my Harbor Freight changer with nifty No-Mar rim holders and mount/dismount bar along with a Marc Panes balancer. The last go-around with my Battle Wings did it. Maybe I'm getting old, but paying $30 a tire to not get intimate with and cuss at new tires has now become worth it for me.
Case closed! :bom_smash: I'm with you, my brutha.
 

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If you think you can, do it..... I do mine, the money I save is better in my pocket than a dealers....
 

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The local tire shop mounts bike tires (off the bike) for $7.50. and never a scratched rim. The owner is a rider.... I use Ride-on. Balances and claims to seal punctures too. Costs about the same as the mounting.
btw, I don't cut and split my own firewood either and I heat with wood...I guess you pick your battles. :yesnod:

btw, I think its good to know how to do your own maintenance. Hats off to the DIY tire changers!
 

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I do almost all my own wrenching. Right down to overhauling motors. I do not change my own tires. I remove my own wheels, check and change bearings, then take them by the dealer who uses a high dollar touchless tire changing machine. While he changes it, I am trying to convince the sexiest bike in the shop to come spend the night with me.

I change my dirt bike tires, which are harder than tubeless. But my dirt bike wheels have been hammered to death by the rocks of eastern Kentucky. My strom wheels are veterans of a dozen tire changes and no scratches.

Some will opine that the skill builds character, so does hitting your head with a hammer.
 

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The local tire shop mounts bike tires (off the bike) for $7.50. and never a scratched rim. The owner is a rider.... I use Ride-on. Balances and claims to seal punctures too. Costs about the same as the mounting.
btw, I don't cut and split my own firewood either and I heat with wood...I guess you pick your battles. :yesnod:

btw, I think its good to know how to do your own maintenance. Hats off to the DIY tire changers!
That's very interesting since I've never bought fire wood for heating since 1988 and use my log splitter to break the tire beads. :green_lol:
 

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A 7.50 per tire install by a dealer is the exception not the rule. I consider 20 bucks per tire to be "cheap" and they're usually 50+. Screw that noise.

I spent less than 50 bucks for my tire tools and balancer and can change my own tire in 15 to 30 minutes.
 
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