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What chain wax/lube do you PRIMARILY use?

  • DuPont (Teflon Chain-Saver)

    Votes: 112 30.9%
  • Maxima (Chain Wax)

    Votes: 78 21.5%
  • BelRay (SuperClean Chain Lube)

    Votes: 30 8.3%
  • Tirox (Chain Wax)

    Votes: 6 1.7%
  • Motul brand

    Votes: 23 6.3%
  • Ipone brand

    Votes: 1 0.3%
  • Wurth brand

    Votes: 16 4.4%
  • Motor oil (used/new?)

    Votes: 18 5.0%
  • WD40

    Votes: 12 3.3%
  • (other: please post and specify!)

    Votes: 67 18.5%

  • Total voters
    363
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I'd love to see how you were applying it (although it really is simple) and if you were "cleaning" it.

If you do nothing you should get 20,000 to 25,000 miles out of the chain as it returns to rear sprocket. I'm not gentle on the throttle and ride in a lot of crap (I have over 4,000 km so far in 2020 and most of that is on salt covered or brined roads so the chain isn't exactly living a cozy life.) My current chain is over 32,000 miles and I'll be replacing the front sprocket sometime in the next few thousand miles. The chain will be good for over 50,000 miles.

..Tom
Tom, on centerstand & in gear, spraying it over the bottom of the chain as it returns to rear sprocket, so none gets on the rear tire. Never cleaned any of my chains. Always replace chain w/new sprockets no matter what they look like. Maybe it's the 14Tooth front, but even running the 15T I ate them up in 20K miles.

I'm ordering new now and am going to try the EK Heavy Duty 525 GXW X ring chain. It's $30 more than standard weight chain so I'm gonna try it...sprocketcenter.com:

��
JT Sprockets (#JTF520) 525 Pitch Chromoly-Steel Front Sprocket
SELECT TOOTH SIZE14 Tooth
$15.00$15.00
JT Sprockets (#JTR1792) 525 Pitch Steel Rear Sprocket
SELECT TOOTH SIZE47 Tooth
$37.00$37.00
RK Chain 525 GXW Heavy Duty X'ring Chain - (choose color / choose length)
SELECT CHAIN COLORNATURALSELECT CHAIN LENGTH118 Links
$129.00$129.00
 

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Tom, on centerstand & in gear, spraying it over the bottom of the chain as it returns to rear sprocket, so none gets on the rear tire. Never cleaned any of my chains. Always replace chain w/new sprockets no matter what they look like. Maybe it's the 14Tooth front, but even running the 15T I ate them up in 20K miles.
..
Seems to be working for several others besides myself. Wonder what the difference is?

I stopped doing it with engine on in gear a long time ago. It is easier and quicker to do manually on the stand with one hand moving and the other spraying. I think it does a better job of getting into the chain at the appropriate areas (spray where the links are side by side and lube gets onto both sides of the links plus between them and into the roller/link area.

I don't think it matters outside or inside of the chain as on my 650's I was lubing the inside (top of the chain below swingarm) but on my DL1000 I'm doing the top of the chain above the swingarm as it's easier to do. Lube does get onto the swingarm and rear wheel.

..Tom
 

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Tom, on centerstand & in gear, spraying it over the bottom of the chain as it returns to rear sprocket, so none gets on the rear tire.
Lubing the chain while in gear is probably way more dangerous than anything I want to do. (and I'm an ex hang-glider pilot with over 300 hours of air time).
Just google that practice and see if it doesn't make you think twice about it.
I would not recommend that to anyone. Ever.
 

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Lubing the chain while in gear is probably way more dangerous than anything I want to do. (and I'm an ex hang-glider pilot with over 300 hours of air time).
Just google that practice and see if it doesn't make you think twice about it.
I would not recommend that to anyone. Ever.
Danger aside I used to do it thinking it would save time but learned it doesn't. Quicker just to turn the wheel with one hand and lube with the other.

..Tom
 

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BMW Chain Lube with Moly for me. My powersports dealer carries 16 different brands of internal combustion toys including BMW and Suzuki and I bought a can of it while I still had my ZX11 on a whim. I've been using it exclusively ever since. It goes on clear and dry and leaves no residue on the wheel and a slight patina on the swingarm. I don't clean my chains anymore as my riding doesn't consist of any mud bogging, and this stuff doesn't accumulate any buildup of gunk. I keep the pressure washer nozzle away from the chain when washing it and wipe the entire run down before lubing.
But I'm tempted to try the DuPont Chain Saver, as it's cheaper and from what I read on this thread and elsewhere, seems to be formulated much the same and with similar results.
 

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Lubing the chain while in gear is probably way more dangerous than anything I want to do. (and I'm an ex hang-glider pilot with over 300 hours of air time).
Just google that practice and see if it doesn't make you think twice about it.
I would not recommend that to anyone. Ever.
It's even more fun after putting 3/4" raising links on the bike which gets the rear tire just in contact with the ground. Appreciate the concern but I use a spray can with a snorkel and the 10 phalanges or clothing never get near the chain.
 

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Fortnine is of the opinion and some pretty thorough testing, that good ole cheap gear oil is the best thing to lube/protect chains with. Must be why oilers work so well, although perhaps a bit messier. Otherwise I'd stick with the Dupont chainsaver or perhaps the Original Bike spirits spray lubes if I ever went without my Tuturo oiler.
 

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I found oil was not a lot worse on the wheel and swingarm than chain wax if you didn't over apply, but I found the chain itself was a lot cleaner and with a fresh application, you could feel the lack of friction.
 

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Fortnine is of the opinion and some pretty thorough testing, that good ole cheap gear oil is the best thing to lube/protect chains with. Must be why oilers work so well, although perhaps a bit messier. Otherwise I'd stick with the Dupont chainsaver or perhaps the Original Bike spirits spray lubes if I ever went without my Tuturo oiler.
On my current chain been using nothing but gear oil, 37K miles and no signs of dying, on my 2nd front sprocket, it looks like the chain will out live the rear. Chain wax/lubes only yielded 18K-30K miles, they also gummed up the clutch mechanism on my '09 Wee which made lever pull feel sticky and sluggish.
 

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I'd love to see how you were applying it (although it really is simple) and if you were "cleaning" it.

If you do nothing you should get 20,000 to 25,000 miles out of the chain. I'm not gentle on the throttle and ride in a lot of crap (I have over 4,000 km so far in 2020 and most of that is on salt covered or brined roads so the chain isn't exactly living a cozy life.) My current chain is over 32,000 miles and I'll be replacing the front sprocket sometime in the next few thousand miles. The chain will be good for over 50,000 miles.

..Tom
sorry Tom, but that's bunk, IMHO, it's not acceleration that prematurely wears a chain or sprocket, it's abrupt deceleration, I wore our my original 525 chain & sprockets in 8k with a Scottoiler I've gone to 530, and change my front sprocket at 22k and manage to get 45k from the chain & rear sprocket

everybody has different riding style, and such, have different rates of wear on ALL the wear items, I wear out front sprockets , but brakes pads last me forever 90k +
 

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@OydnaR

Front sprockets have less than half the teeth that the rear has so they naturally wear faster than the rear.

I did a poll a long time ago here and almost everyone got around 20,000 to 25,000 miles on their chains regardless of what chain lube they were using. Even people that didn't lube got similar mileage. Only group that seemed to get consistently more mileage were those that used automatic chain Oilers.

Front sprockets get much more wear from acceleration and keeping speed up than deceleration. All the energy required to get a bike up to speed (and keep it there) comes from the engine though that sprocket. If you lift off the throttle that puts wear on the sprocket but air and other drag also slows down the bike so less slowing force goes though the sprocket. Also think of this: if you rode for 100 miles the front sprocket speeds you up and also has to maintain your speed. You might slow down once for a few seconds compared to accelerating and holding speed for hours.

..Tom
 

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Hey Tom, how often do you have to replace the cush rubbers??? I get about 20K out of them too, then I shim 'em for another 20K before replacing.
I've never had to replace any cash rubbers in any of my stroms. We check them when tires get charged but they are always in there snugly and don't fall out.

I think I'm doing something wrong.

..Tom
 

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I think I'm doing something wrong.

..Tom
Nope, it's me and my wrist wringing the damn thing's neck every chance I get. I don't speed, but I like to get there quick and hear the rpm`s sing.

Now that we got that settled........Neeeext!
 

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Hey Tom, how often do you have to replace the cush rubbers??? I get about 20K out of them too, then I shim 'em for another 20K before replacing.
I just replaced my cush rubbers last week when replacing tire. Sprocket was able to easily separate from hub, but difficult to get inserted with new rubbers. I didn't notice any difference in feel on the road. Could have waited until the next tire change at least.

2009 650 - 84K miles
 

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I just replaced my cush rubbers last week when replacing tire. Sprocket was able to easily separate from hub, but difficult to get inserted with new rubbers. I didn't notice any difference in feel on the road. Could have waited until the next tire change at least.

2009 650 - 84K miles
The rule of thumb is once the rear tire is removed, just turn it over and if the sprocket and carrier fall out, the rubbers are shot. Shimming with cut pieces of innertube actually work very well for a long time, but eventually the cush rubbers need to be replaced. You are correct, I have never really felt any difference after replacement, but I know any slack in the drive-train is going to wear out chain and sprockets faster. I check them at every tire change and shim/replace as needed.
 

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I've never had to replace any cash rubbers in any of my stroms. We check them when tires get charged but they are always in there snugly and don't fall out.

I think I'm doing something wrong.

..Tom
same here, BUT, I got a spare rear wheel, complete with sprocket, carrier & cush drive rubbers that I run my darkside tire on, both wheels have approx same mileage 60k±
 

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BTW, the lube that we all spray on our chains never gets past the 0-rings that hold the actual 'lubrication' that keeps your chain alive. The only thing our spray lubes are doing is keeping the o-rings clean and free of dirt so they don't get damaged, which would allow dirt/grit/water inside where all the real damage would occur - this is the most critical component of chain longevity, O-ring health..... Spray lube keeps corrosion at bay, silences the pin rollers keeping your chain quieter (those don't really do anything either - they hardly rotate at all), and keeping those precious 0-rings happy and clean. Bonus: It's why Scott-oiler type devices are so effective since the regular application of lube/oil to the chain carries dirt, grit, and water away - also prevents corrosion where the O-ring meets the link plates.....
 
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