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Between me (Bonehead) and my brothers Meathead and Fathead, we've changed a bunch of chains & sprockets on the 2012-16 650. My recollection for first time change was one of my bro's needed a cheater bar, the other we used a manual hand impact driver, and mine came off plenty easy with neither (just a 1/2" breaker bar).

Subsequent changes basically mirror the initial experience. I noted on mine recently the OEM-applied red thread locker didn't seem to set, and the nut was surprisingly (though not worryingly) easy to loosen. The thread locker was mostly intact inside the nut. Nut and shaft threads seemed fine, fortunately, and I can't explain it.

The 32mm nut is fairly well recessed relative to the distance at which you have enough clearance for a clean 90º angle between breaker bar and socket. Getting that 90º angle helps, IME. A relatively deep well 32mm socket (there are cheaper options) makes it easier, without the sloppiness of extensions.

I've never needed to grind off the pin heads. I suspect at least some chain tool pin breaks are due to slight misalignment while pushing out the pin. My DID KM500R chain tool does the trick just fine without grinding. It's not cheap, but has more than earned its keep.

The KM500R also is manufactured to allow an essentially worry- / hassle-free pressing of plate and flaring of pins -- in both cases, after configuring the tool for pressing or flaring, you tighten the tool until it stops. Basically, the tool won't allow you to over-press or -flare. (Of course, you should still check the finished specs to confirm all is well...in case you didn't press or flare enough, or flubbed the configuration when doing so.)

The English subtitled Japanese language DID KM500R instructional video is excellent. If you can follow simple instructions, name your ABCs up to...uhhh...B, and turn a wrench, you can use this tool. Whether you should or not, that's up to you...
 

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Don't forget to check the Cush Rubbers when the rear tire is off. Turn the wheel over to put the sprocket side down. If the sprocket falls off the rubbers are shot. You can shim them with small squares of inner tube and it really works very well as the rubbers are not what I would call cheap. My m/o is to shim for one more set of chain and sprockets, then replace with oem rubbers.
 

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Hi All,
Chain issue on my 2005 Wee. I commute 84 miles a day, so I put miles on. My chain is noticeably loose and and appears to be “missing” on the chainring. Chainrings look good. I put the bike on the center stand and tightened the chain. I then spun the wheel backward (in neutral) and noticed that the chain would ride up out of the rear cogs each turn in one spot. (Picture below) I assume this is because of chain stretch? Am I correct?
Thank you!!!
JP View attachment 285979 View attachment 285979
Hi All,
Chain issue on my 2005 Wee. I commute 84 miles a day, so I put miles on. My chain is noticeably loose and and appears to be “missing” on the chainring. Chainrings look good. I put the bike on the center stand and tightened the chain. I then spun the wheel backward (in neutral) and noticed that the chain would ride up out of the rear cogs each turn in one spot. (Picture below) I assume this is because of chain stretch? Am I correct?
Thank you!!!
JP View attachment 285979 View attachment 285979
I have never seen a chain /sprocket in this condition. When a sprocket wears it will maintain closely the pitch between the rear edge of the teeth. In theory putting a new chain onto a worn sprocket will still have it bed into the sprocket. The rollers of the chain do experience some wear that can make a small different. Your chain can not even bed into the sprocket so their may be two problems.
One The chain pitch is different to that of the sprocket.
Two. The sprocket material is so poor that the wear is out of step with the rollers.

Basically replace front and rear sprockets and put on a quality x ring chain (Japanese)
Be sure to get STEEL sprockets.
I use White lithium spray grease every fuel up on the chain and every 5 fuel ups I wipe down the chain with a cloth soaked in kerosene.
 

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Discussion Starter · #44 ·
Well guys and gals, I got her done...mostly. Still adjusting the rear wheel. Also, the brake disc seams to be rubbing a little in the caliper now. The chain riveting tool was crap. I had to drill out the hole in an attempt to give the River/pin ends enough room to come through the plate to use the rivet pin. I believe I got it done acceptably. I’ll attach a picture. While I’m at it I am going to put on my first skid plate...which I have to adapt. I appreciate the input and am happy to be learning about the bike and how to work on it.
JP
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F4F5A507-757F-448C-A94D-7361EFAE511A.jpeg 8B2C068B-8195-434B-AF05-DCFB01C28612.jpeg 8B2C068B-8195-434B-AF05-DCFB01C28612.jpeg
 

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Glad you got it done. Not very sexy work, but nobody wants an old worn out chain.

Might try forging my old one into a knife of some kind.
 

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Discussion Starter · #46 ·
Glad you got it done. Not very sexy work, but nobody wants an old worn out chain.

Might try forging my old one into a knife of some kind.
Yeah. My older son is going to welding school. I saved the chain and sprockets for a potential art project:)
 
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