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if the bike have being used for so many miles with that chain / sprockets set, the nuts are more than likely super super tight. If you don't have experience changing sprockets, take the bike to a mechanic and do the sprockets and chain. Oh yes, align the wheel too.
 

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Chains don't stretch, but sprockets wear........that's your problem, plus bad chain/sprocket alignment as well.
Chains can "stretch" in that the surfaces inside each pivot point can wear, effectively making each link a tiny bit longer. I had one that did this very differently in different parts of the chain. In retrospect I think it was because I blasted the chain with a carwash sprayer, driving water in past the o-rings -- but only for that part of the chain that was exposed. I have pictures of it around somewhere. It's wild. When folded over on itself, one half of the chain is a half-link longer than the other.
 

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Approx. 1.5" is actually preferred.
View attachment 285987
Be warned that chain wear can be uneven from one part of the chain to another. To evaluate this, arrange for the rear wheel to be off the ground, and slowly spin the rear while while checking the chain tension regularly. Spin the wheel enough to go through the full length of the chain, about 3 or 4 rotations of the wheel.

I've had this uneven wear happen to me only once, but when it did, it was dramatic.
 

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2007 V-Strom 650
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Be warned that chain wear can be uneven from one part of the chain to another. To evaluate this, arrange for the rear wheel to be off the ground, and slowly spin the rear while while checking the chain tension regularly. Spin the wheel enough to go through the full length of the chain, about 3 or 4 rotations of the wheel.

I've had this uneven wear happen to me only once, but when it did, it was dramatic.
So what causes the uneven wear? Spotty lubing repeatedly or just faulty chain? Perhaps defectively made sproket(s) teeth unevenly spaced (highly unlikely).
 

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2011 650 V-Strom with ABS
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All three components are worn. Putting a new chain on worn sprockets will cause accelerated wear on the chain.

I like DID x-ring chains and I put a cheapo manual oiler so I lubricate the chain every time I ride. It prevents rust, reduces wear and helps clean the chain actually.

The front sprocket wears two or three times faster than the rear sprocket, so I intend to replace the front once and then all three components again. With a good x-ring or o-ring chain and regular lubrication you could get 15-20,000 miles before you have to replace anything.
 

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So what causes the uneven wear? Spotty lubing repeatedly or just faulty chain? Perhaps defectively made sproket(s) teeth unevenly spaced (highly unlikely).
My Procedure - Lube the chain often by applying the lube to a cloth and wiping on the lube. This both cleans and lubes the chain. I NEVER use any kind of solvents to 'clean' my chain!!! Been There, Done That, Killed The Chain!!!
286054
 

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That chain and sprockets are way, way, WAAAAYYYYYYY beyond worn out. Replace ASAP and PDQ.

Unless they have, like, 100 miles on them, there's no defect. That's just how chains and sprockets wear. They don't last forever, and these parts appear to have led a long and reasonably healthy life.

The original chain isn't the very best, but generally 15,000 - 20,000 miles with some occasional sort of care is common. You can get more with better care, and a better quality name brand x-ring chain and sprockets will last a fair bit longer as well. Many report 30,000 miles and more with better parts.

I'm partial to EK chains and JT sprockets, but there are other good brands. The cheapies all over fleaBay and scAmazon are dangerous garbage.
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
Thank you for the insightful input everyone! I ordered a sprockets and chain set (Vortex), along with a chain tool set from Cycle Gear, as there are no parts or mechanics available where I live for quite some time. I also want to be capable of working on my bike. The kit has a chain pre-sized for this model / year Wee. I will, of coarse spend time watching videos to familiarize myself with the proper procedure, method, tool use etc. I appreciate your time and input and can’t wait to be able to ride again!
JP
 

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Thank you for the insightful input everyone! I ordered a sprockets and chain set (Vortex), along with a chain tool set from Cycle Gear, as there are no parts or mechanics available where I live for quite some time. I also want to be capable of working on my bike. The kit has a chain pre-sized for this model / year Wee. I will, of coarse spend time watching videos to familiarize myself with the proper procedure, method, tool use etc. I appreciate your time and input and can’t wait to be able to ride again!
JP
Double-check that they really send you the right length of chain. I had a shop install a chain "sized for my bike" that was really a stock size that was two links too long. I quickly ran out of adjustment capacity and had to re-size it myself.
 

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if the bike have being used for so many miles with that chain / sprockets set, the nuts are more than likely super super tight. If you don't have experience changing sprockets, take the bike to a mechanic and do the sprockets and chain. Oh yes, align the wheel too.
I'm not saying you're wrong, but why do you think this is so? I've never had trouble getting them loose.
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
Double-check that they really send you the right length of chain. I had a shop install a chain "sized for my bike" that was really a stock size that was two links too long. I quickly ran out of adjustment capacity and had to re-size it myself.
Will do! Thanks again
 

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Thank you for the insightful input everyone! I ordered a sprockets and chain set (Vortex), along with a chain tool set from Cycle Gear, as there are no parts or mechanics available where I live for quite some time. I also want to be capable of working on my bike. The kit has a chain pre-sized for this model / year Wee. I will, of coarse spend time watching videos to familiarize myself with the proper procedure, method, tool use etc. I appreciate your time and input and can’t wait to be able to ride again!
JP
Hopefully you got steel sprockets.. Vortex does alot of aluminum.. Aluminum probably won't last nearly as long on a commuter bike.
 

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Hopefully the "chain tool set" includes pins for pushing a pin out of the old chain, a press to press the new master plate in place, and a rivet pin to spread the ends of the new master link pins.

Loosen the front sprocket nut before doing anything to break the chain. The rear tire must be "locked" someway, 2x4 through the spokes, put in gear and lock on the rear brake, etc. Hopefully you have a 1/2" drive or larger air gun with enough torque to break it loose. Usually rent a socket to fit the nut at an auto parts store. Using wrenches is a pita.

A 4" handheld grinder works well for grinding the end of a pin flat on the old chain. This MUST be done before attempting to press the pin out. Do this with the chosen link pin at a spot on the rear sprocket that is accessible. Use something to hold the rear brake on or put it in gear so the tire doesn't spin while working on it. . If the new chain is too long, no big deal, just "break it" the same way you did the old chain, just be sure it's the right pin/link for the needed length. Most of the chains I buy are a link or 10 too long, because I can get the best price vs looking for a specific length.

You need calipers to measure across the chain plates, so you know when the master link plate is pressed to the correct width. and then to measure the diameter of the rivet pins to know when the have been pressed far enough. A cordless impact gun works great for driving the pin/rivet press vs using wrenches.

A torque wrench should used to torque the front and rear sprocket nuts. As for alignment, search for the string alignment method. Once done, count the number of flats when adjusting the chain each side. Also check to see if your hash marks are on or not. Most of my bikes have had accurate hash marks, but they need to be checked.
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
Hopefully the "chain tool set" includes pins for pushing a pin out of the old chain, a press to press the new master plate in place, and a rivet pin to spread the ends of the new master link pins.

Loosen the front sprocket nut before doing anything to break the chain. The rear tire must be "locked" someway, 2x4 through the spokes, put in gear and lock on the rear brake, etc. Hopefully you have a 1/2" drive or larger air gun with enough torque to break it loose. Usually rent a socket to fit the nut at an auto parts store. Using wrenches is a pita.

A 4" handheld grinder works well for grinding the end of a pin flat on the old chain. This MUST be done before attempting to press the pin out. Do this with the chosen link pin at a spot on the rear sprocket that is accessible. Use something to hold the rear brake on or put it in gear so the tire doesn't spin while working on it. . If the new chain is too long, no big deal, just "break it" the same way you did the old chain, just be sure it's the right pin/link for the needed length. Most of the chains I buy are a link or 10 too long, because I can get the best price vs looking for a specific length.

You need calipers to measure across the chain plates, so you know when the master link plate is pressed to the correct width. and then to measure the diameter of the rivet pins to know when the have been pressed far enough. A cordless impact gun works great for driving the pin/rivet press vs using wrenches.

A torque wrench should used to torque the front and rear sprocket nuts. As for alignment, search for the string alignment method. Once done, count the number of flats when adjusting the chain each side. Also check to see if your hash marks are on or not. Most of my bikes have had accurate hash marks, but they need to be checked.
Thank you for the in depth response! I will follow your directions. The toolkit is “good”...containing what you suggest.
 

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I'm not saying you're wrong, but why do you think this is so? I've never had trouble getting them loose.
It happened to my wife's bike (different brand), the nut was to tight that the mechanic needed a pipe to extend the ratchet 's arm. There was no way to do that just by hand with a normal ratchet. The guy also told us that he have had cases where he need even longer extenders, the type you need to change a truck's tyre.
Whether this happen due dirt/rust in the nut / bolt or it's a specific brand issue or is just bad luck, I can't tell.
 

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When the chain pins and bushings wear, the chain becomes physically longer. When this happens , the chain will describe a greater radius around a sprocket of a given number of teeth. Therefore it rides higher on the teeth. Your sprockets don't loo too bad, but I would recommend replacing both chain & sprockets so everything is starting out new. Invest in an automatic oiler to provide continuous lubrication for maximum life.

I fitted a used Cameleon oiler to my 650 VStrom XT. It's been over 2000 miles since and I have not had to adjust the chain. (It's the original OEM chain.)

Norm Kern
 
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