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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Recently, about 2,000 miles ago, I put a new chain and replaced both sprockets at the same time. I lube it regularly and keep my eye on slack.

Now sometimes I can see upper slack while chain in the bottom becomes pretty tight, about 10 mm if not less. If I put my bike on a center stand, put a neutral and slowly spin a rear wheel, I can see normal bottom slack, about 25mm and upper chain looks normal and tight. As I could see, the chain is still in perfect condition and there is no sign of wear.
Why slack from time to time "moves" from down to up? Was it matter how I install the chain? I mean forward, rearward, upside down? I think it doesn't matter, at least D.I.D didn't have any instruction about it.
 

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Not sure I'm following on this...

Are you seeing "chain slack" as the chain is in motion? When I've got the bike tire up and the bike in first (which allows the wheel to spin while I hose the chain down) the chain will appear to lurch and jump a bit. As long as your chain isn't kinky and is adjusted correctly, this is normal because the chain is spinning so very slowly.

However, there are tight spots and looser spots on all chains. According to the manual you should check the chain tension at its tightest point. So perhaps what you're observing is the tight spot on the chain.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I wasn't clear. One picture is worth of thousand words.

It can be seen that there is slack on the top, below is almost no slack. But if I start to slowly spin a wheel and check slack below, it appear to be fine.
Is there something wrong?

 

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upper slack...

Looks like you have a combination of maybe a hair to much chain slack, and something that is binding the chain from the top i.e. not allowing it to glide smoothly across the top of the swing arm. It looks like something is preventing the front sprocket from easily releasing the tension (it looks tight on the bottom in your picture). You'd see the same thing happen if you locked the front sprocket in place, say with a socket wrench and then rotated the rear tire back and forth...

When you replaced the chain, did you take the opportunity to clean the gunk off all of the sliding surfaces? Along those same lines, is there enough lubrication along the top chain guide? I'd check for proper lubrication, make sure nothing is binding, and take a little more slack out of the chain.
 

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speaking of lube...

Now that I look at that chain and sprocket, they look pretty dry to me (unless you just cleaned it). I definitely think lubrication is your problem.

But I may just always over lubricate -- I use a good chain wax every 3-500 miles (books typically say every 200). :fineprint: I typically get 15k out of a chain sprocket set though... My two cents.
 

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It all has to do with the position of the engine sprocket vs. the wheel sprocket. For example, when slowing under compression, the slack will be on the top. When accelerating, the slack will be on the bottom. when you hit a big bump, there is little slack.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
When you replaced the chain, did you take the opportunity to clean the gunk off all of the sliding surfaces? Along those same lines, is there enough lubrication along the top chain guide? I'd check for proper lubrication, make sure nothing is binding, and take a little more slack out of the chain.
Yes, I did clean on the top and everything surrounding.
 

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It all has to do with the position of the engine sprocket vs. the wheel sprocket. For example, when slowing under compression, the slack will be on the top. When accelerating, the slack will be on the bottom. when you hit a big bump, there is little slack.
I agree with PT RIDER. Loosen the rear wheel and re-adjust by pulling back on the top and reset the tension evenly on top and bottom..
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Now that I look at that chain and sprocket, they look pretty dry to me (unless you just cleaned it). I definitely think lubrication is your problem.
I lubricated it yesterday. My chain is a gold color plus picture was taken from close proximity with the flash.
I don't think lubrication is the problem. I lube it every 600 miles or so. Even if I wouldn't lubricate at all, the chain has only 2,000 miles.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I agree with PT RIDER. Loosen the rear wheel and re-adjust by pulling back on the top and reset the tension evenly on top and bottom..
I agree too. That is exactly what I did yesterday. Maybe I didn't resent the tension evenly. I guess I'll do it again.
 

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hot or cold

Recently, about 2,000 miles ago, I put a new chain and replaced both sprockets at the same time. I lube it regularly and keep my eye on slack.

Now sometimes I can see upper slack while chain in the bottom becomes pretty tight, about 10 mm if not less. If I put my bike on a center stand, put a neutral and slowly spin a rear wheel, I can see normal bottom slack, about 25mm and upper chain looks normal and tight. As I could see, the chain is still in perfect condition and there is no sign of wear.
Why slack from time to time "moves" from down to up? Was it matter how I install the chain? I mean forward, rearward, upside down? I think it doesn't matter, at least D.I.D didn't have any instruction about it.
different hot or cold?

engine oil = tranmission oil, = nternal friction, that is
 

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chain slack...

I guess the operative question is, when you took the picture, was the bike in neutral or in gear? If it was in neutral and everything is lubricated and torqued correctly, the weight of the chain should be enough to rotate the front sprocket and xfer the slack down; on the centerstand that should be even easier.

My point is, if you're not holding the wheel in place and the bike isn't in gear, the slack shouldn't sit on top like that unless something is binding a bit.

However, if you put the bike in gear, put it on the centerstand and rotate the wheel in either direction until it wont' go anymore and hold it, you'll see slack either on top (rotated forward) or on bottom (rotated backward), more than you'd see with both wheel on the ground or the suspension fully actuated. Kind of like your picture :)
 

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Don't worry about it. As long as the chain is not coming off the sprocket from suspension actions n' stuff, you're ok. And, lube on an o-ring chain is mostly for corrosion control, contrary to what the worry wart side plate crew believes......thats what DID chain tech says.
 

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I wasn't clear. One picture is worth of thousand words.

It can be seen that there is slack on the top, below is almost no slack. But if I start to slowly spin a wheel and check slack below, it appear to be fine.
Is there something wrong?

In that picture, is your bike in gear and rolled back as far as it will go?
Because if that's the case, then the chain makes perfect sense.
 

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In that picture, is your bike in gear and rolled back as far as it will go?
Because if that's the case, then the chain makes perfect sense.
It would have to be, no other way to get that kind of slack up top but not on the bottom run.
 

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Yeah. That's why I said that.
Strange things we worry about and that the obvious only comes up on page 2.
Roll the bike forward and measure you slack as per the manual.
 

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Don't worry about it. As long as the chain is not coming off the sprocket from suspension actions n' stuff, you're ok. And, lube on an o-ring chain is mostly for corrosion control, contrary to what the worry wart side plate crew believes......thats what DID chain tech says.
Lubing the chain lubricates the roller to bushing interface. The sealed in lube only handles the bushing to pin interface.

 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I guess the operative question is, when you took the picture, was the bike in neutral or in gear? If it was in neutral and everything is lubricated and torqued correctly, the weight of the chain should be enough to rotate the front sprocket and xfer the slack down; on the centerstand that should be even easier.

My point is, if you're not holding the wheel in place and the bike isn't in gear, the slack shouldn't sit on top like that unless something is binding a bit.

However, if you put the bike in gear, put it on the centerstand and rotate the wheel in either direction until it wont' go anymore and hold it, you'll see slack either on top (rotated forward) or on bottom (rotated backward), more than you'd see with both wheel on the ground or the suspension fully actuated. Kind of like your picture :)
Narf, after reading your post, it totally makes sense. the bike was in gear. that was puzzling me when I observed slack on top on the parked bike in 1st gear. then I put the bike in neutral, rotated the wheel and slack was within specs. on the following day I observed the same again and re-routed the chain with no better results.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Lubing the chain lubricates the roller to bushing interface. The sealed in lube only handles the bushing to pin interface.

Greywolf, not to hijack the thread. Actually it's my thread and it's ok:)

According to your signature, you're happy owner of a '12 Wee. How do you like it? I took a road test recently and was very impressed. S/b told me he didn't like it because of cheap plastic, brakes recall, blah-blah... I would like to hear your opinion.
Thanks!
 

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