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I was curious if anyone has tried setting their chain slack using a bike stand, and checking later on the side-stand to see if it makes any difference? It sure would be an easier process on the stand.

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I always set my chains on the centerstand. It isn't rocket science, just don't make it too tight
 
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I was curious if anyone has tried setting their chain slack using a bike stand, and checking later on the side-stand to see if it makes any difference? It sure would be an easier process on the stand.

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Hi, I'm sure there will be a difference in measured slack depending on if the bike is loaded or unloaded. The rear padock stand and side stand should be similar as the bike is loaded but the unloaded centre stand measurement will likely be a different reading. I would check the user manual to see the recommended method but I don't have one yet and I'm not sure of your model. However, I had a Yamaha Tracer which the recommended slack was not enough and I always take measurements at a couple of different rotational points as they will be different due to non concentric sprockets & chain wear.
 

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bike stand is how I set mine.. to shop manual range.. just adjusted it today.
 

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I was curious if anyone has tried setting their chain slack using a bike stand, and checking later on the side-stand to see if it makes any difference? It sure would be an easier process on the stand.

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Hi, just checked the 1050 manual and it states it should be adjusted on the side stand according to attached. It then goes on to torque the rear axle. I always re-check the slack after torquing the nut as in my experience it changes the measurement.
Maybe set the slack on the paddock stand if that's how you prefer doing it and re-check on the side stand to see if it's the same, then you'll know for sure. Final check will be when you ride it as a tight chain is very noticeable and very detrimental to bearing life. I also hate a slack chain!
 

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The manual is quite clear that chain slack is to be checked on the side stand. It is from that reference point that normal variance is accounted for.

They do not, however, specify whether the motorcycle should be unloaded, though it seems illogical that they'd assume otherwise, so I remove the panniers and top case, and set the preload to about the center of its range.

It is not at all difficult, and I say that as someone with only basic mechanical skills.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The manual is quite clear that chain slack is to be checked on the side stand. It is from that reference point that normal variance is accounted for.

They do not, however, specify whether the motorcycle should be unloaded, though it seems illogical that they'd assume otherwise, so I remove the panniers and top case, and set the preload to about the center of its range.

It is not at all difficult, and I say that as someone with only basic mechanical skills.
Yea, agreed that it's not hard per se. It's just much easier on the knees and convenient in conjunction with an adjustment, alignment and lube.
 

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I set it on the side stand to the book but validate chain alignment on the paddock stand. It’s easer for me to see down the chain while rotating the wheel.
 

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Yea, agreed that it's not hard per se. It's just much easier on the knees and convenient in conjunction with an adjustment, alignment and lube.
I do know about knees. And every other freaking joint I never used have to think about. :(

I reckon I wouldn't expect to see a huge difference in the final outcome with a Pit Bull-type rear stand like you're using, since you're still accounting for static sag in both cases. However, it's going to be sitting slightly lower on the suspension your way than it would be on the side stand (which would be supporting at least some of that weight).

The center stand method completely unloads the suspension, usually, so likely the bike will be sitting considerably higher in that case.
 

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I agree the maintenance manual states to adjust the chain on the side stand. I always adjust my chain on the center stand and check the slack about every 6". You will always find that the slack is different at different locations on the chain.

Another thought about the manual stating to check the chain on the side stand. Could this be because V Stroms are only sold stock with a side stand providing no other way but to adjust the chain from the factory but on the side stand🤔

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The logical reason for the manual to state that the side stand should be used to check chain slack is, the side stand is always available on the bike, no matter where you travel. Not everyone has a center stand fitted on their bike, nor does one transport the swingarm stand along when riding or travelling.
Back to the question of adjusting the chain while on the swingarm / spool stand, it is one of the better methods of loading the swingarm without the rider being in the saddle. The swingarm pivot is key, not the front sprocket, as the swingarm range of swivel / movement is the reason for the chain slack adjustment. The swingarm stand trumps the side stand, when it comes to chain adjustment, as one can spin the wheel to find at which point the chain is the tightest section and whether the chain alignment is running true on the sprockets (sprocket in the center of the chain links) A center stand ialso allows for sping the wheel to locate tight points, etc, but i doesn't load the swingarm. While on the spool stand, the chain maintenance can include inspection for o-ring damage, measure for chain service limit, inspect master link condition, manually lube the chain, etc
Have a look at threads like: does suspension travel change chain tension, Adjusting chain slack, How do YOU measure chain slack? and How much force for chain slack measurement?
 

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Another thought about the manual stating to check the chain on the side stand. Could this be because V Stroms are only sold stock with a side stand providing no other way but to adjust the chain from the factory but on the side stand🤔
It would be interesting to know what Suzuki recommends for bikes that come equipped with the OE center stand?

Also I was always under impression that the "engine sprocket" is the center of the rotation of the "rear sprocket". So the distance from the center of each sprocket should "stay the same" while on; sidestand, pit stand or center stand, or even no stands at all with "two up"?

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That would be true if the swingarm pivot point was in the center of the sprocket.
But it's not.
As a layman I would tend to agree from a principle point of view that the centre of rotation is not as simple as previously advised and my own experience has confirmed this to me anyhow from a pragmatic point of view, however I'm always open to learning from suitably qualified and experienced others.
Plus there is the chain contact with the swingarm chain slide/guide that must surely influence the available slack when at the extremes of travel.
Anyhoo, good luck trying getting the correct answer from Suzuki or a knowledgeable dealer!
Maybe overthinking is at play here, perhaps we should use the manual as a guide and a certain amount of common sense to achieve the correct chain slack that each person feels is appropriate as I believe if we try to cover all eventualities that could present themselves regarding maximum travel extension, non concentric manufacturing of sprockets, uneven chain wear, personal strength establishing chain free play etc then this topic could become as much discussed as the average oil thread or whether to use torque wrenches or not.
 

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That would be true if the swingarm pivot point was in the center of the sprocket.
But it's not.
...it seems that all chain driven bikes are made with this "off set", wonder why they couldn't keep the swingarm pivot point in line with the sprocket center?
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I guess a little bit of "off set" is not that critical in today's bikes since the swingarm only travels a few inches. But it's nice to see somebody tried to make it work,

advantage with shaft drives, since the shaft is a two piece power drive.
 
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I have always adjusted the chain on my 2007 Wee with the bike weight on the rear wheel, side-stand method. I haven't actually measured the difference in tension netween the two methods, but the chain is noticeably tighter when the weight is on the wheel.
 

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the tightest spot for chain is when the front, rear sprocket and pivot center are all in line.

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If you are SUPER anal about it, this is what my buddy with home build dirt bike taught me.

1. disconnect the linkage from the swing arm and then rotate to that position. Your chain should JUST be tight enough to be almost straight but not taunt that it is stressing out the O-ring in this position.

2. Adjust it if you can't get move the arm to that position or tighten a bit if too loose.

3. When finish, then reconnect everything and re-measure the slack at the side stand/center stand, it should be closer to the tighter side of spec Suzuki gives you.
 
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