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06 DL650, 42,341 miles.

Recently adjusted chain slack. There is over an inch difference in slack between loosest and tightest points. Also tightest point is where master link enters the front sprocket, it binds slightly, see photo. Was thinking I had recently replaced chain and sprockets, but it's been over 6 years and 20,000 miles ago. o_OI had noticed like something was grabbing when I slowed to a stop and assumed it was the front brake, but think the chain is shot and that was causing the symptom.

Anyway, I forgot how I did the replacement, any tips or current updates are appreciated.
And where to buy new chain and is it recommended to always replace sprockets the same time, or only if teeth are showing wear.
 

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06 DL650, 42,341 miles. I forgot how I did the replacement, any tips or current updates are appreciated. And where to buy new chain and is it recommended to always replace sprockets the same time, or only if teeth are showing wear.
Google is your friend. Lots of "advice" on how-to. One example is
Also check V-Strom Riders International - Index

As far a where to buy chain, I sourced mine from the local dealer. I was completely satisfied regarding the miles I got on the original chain and sprockets, so I went with OEM. And as I am developing a good relation with the parts manager, buying there helps. Their price matched any online options. It is a good dealership. YMMV.

Personally, I'd change the chain and sprockets as a set.
 

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Here are my notes:

Needed:

Chain, 525, 118 links for dl650 2007+ (longer if larger sprockets used, 1 tooth = 1 link)

Front Sprocket, 15 tooth, oem is quietest

Rear Sprocket, 47 tooth (try 48 rear, good results, recommended, need 119 links)

Rear wheel bearing set (2), 08123-62047, seal (1) 09285-28001, dl650 all years

Rear sprocket carrier bearing (1), 09262-32007, seal (1) 09285-39001, dl650 all years

Procedure:

Front sprocket removal: Heat lightly to 150F, let cool, penetrant, wait 24 hrs to break red loctite

Loosen rear axle and chain adjuster bolts

Flatten front sprocket nut washer

32mm or 1 1/4 socket, breaker bar, pipe over handle, 2x4 or large padded breaker bar through rear wheel, standard thread (not reversed)

Remove chain

Install new bearings

Install new sprockets, loctite

Inspect Cush rubbers, add bicycle tubing, vasoline, lay the wheel down sprocket side up, then try and pick up the wheel by the sprocket only. If it pulls out of the hub shim the cush rubbers with inner-tube strips

Install new chain, test fit before removing links

Flare rivets to 0.230" +/- .006"

Torque front sprocket nut to 83 ftlb, blue loctite, bend fresh lock washer section up

FLARE DIMENSIONS

5.5 to 5.8mm.......................525ZVM2
5.5 to 5.8mm.......................525VM2
5.5 to 5.8mm.......................525NZ
5.7mm to 6.0mm................*525ZVM-X, 525VX
*Note: Make sure that the Cutting pin has a groove if you are riveting the 525ZVM-X, 525VX chains








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If you don't feel confident flaring the rivets consider an EK chain with a screw type master link. I haven't tried one yet but after struggling on my first flaring job I would think it would be easier for a first timer.
 

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I have yet to have to do a chain/sprocket but they make me nervous! I'll likely just have it done at the dealer when it comes time. I do everything else on the bike including tire changes so I guess letting them do one thing wouldn't be to bad haha.
 
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I have yet to have to do a chain/sprocket but they make me nervous! I'll likely just have it done at the dealer when it comes time. I do everything else on the bike including tire changes so I guess letting them do one thing wouldn't be to bad haha.
That sounds like it will be a hefty bill
 

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It's not too hard. Tips:
  • Although any riveting tool should/could work, for peace of mind get the tool from the chain manufacturer. Read the instructions carefully, as you'll need the different bits (backing plates and pins) to put the tool in different configurations for removal and installation.
  • Watch a few YT videos beforehand, Google for chain riveting and read a few blog posts.
  • Make sure you are not in a rush when undertaking the job. Ensure a comfortable workplace, lay out all the tools required beforehand up to and including some garage soap to wash your hands afterwards. This reduces stress/anxiety levels because you know you are fully prepared.
  • When riveting the chain, take your time. Check twice from the front and the rear for the proper positioning of your riveting tool before you start the flaring process. Use proper lighting and maybe a small mirror to really see what you're doing and that everything is aligned properly before applying any pressure.
I was anxious about doing my first riveting job but did the above and it was easy. The only (beginners) mistake that I made was that I applied the grease to the pins before I put on the first O-rings. So when I put the O-rings on the pins I also wiped off all the carefully applied grease. Oh well.
 

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Dealer price on chain and sprockets plus labor. My guess is 400
That's not so bad, I can afford $400 every few years.
 
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I think it is unlikely that the chain is causing the grabbing sensation that You are sensing. That is more likely a disc either rear or front. There is some wear on the sprocket but I have seen a lot worse. The chain looks very dry and obviously You lube it very little. Perhaps a good dousing in oil for a start followed by a good chain lube after a run might make quite a difference rather than a big spend on a possibly unnecessary chain and sprocket replacement ?
 

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Big plus 1 on the EK screw on master link.....I will never go back to rivet style.
That's my plan as well. It does mean I have to go with an EK brand chain, but I'm OK with that.

My last chain was a DID. Mixing brands seemed a poor idea, so I used a DID master link & flared the rivets.

Was a bit nerve-wracking, and though I didn't do it as pretty as the factory, it's held for several thousand miles.

OP, if you decide to go with an old-fashioned, flaring-the-rivets type master link, there is one tool I can specifically recommend you not bother with: the Motion Pro 08-0470 PBR (Press, Break, Rivet) tool.

It's not cheap, but doesn't work very well. The provided handle (which screws into the PBR body) is much too small and short. I found it awkward and painful to perform all 3 operations, because you have to hold the tool against the torque you're putting in to break the old master link, press on the new side plate, and finally flare the rivets. And all you have to hold on to is that tiny handle.

Because the thing is so very lopsided, it's fairly easy for the PBR to get out of alignment as you perform the flaring operation. That's very bad.

A better choice is the D.I.D. KMR-500 chain tool: https://www.amazon.com/D-I-D-KM500R-Chain-Rivet-Tool/dp/B0040PM2EI

I haven't tried this one, but it seems better-conceived and gets great reviews. No need to apply off-center forces, no tendency for it to fall off to one side, since it sits right on the chain and is symmetric.

I'll second the recommendation for Sprocket Center. Good prices, fast shipping, and they will cut the chain to the proper number of links if needed. That saves you effort, and can be reassuring if it's your first time changing chain & sprockets.

Finally, I recommend using an impact wrench to remove the front sprocket (aka countershaft) nut. I tried immobilizing the rear wheel, using a breaker bar, you name it, but nothing worked until the impact wrench.

Good luck!
 

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All good advice. With no experience I changed the chain and sprockets on my (now totalled) 2007 650. I just cut the old chain off with my cutoff tool. Riveting the new one wasn't particularly difficult. Neither was replacing the sprockets. I did go up 1 tooth on the front to reduce engine speed and vibrations on the highway (I have long commutes). All in all fairly easy and worth doing yourself to save over $200 at the dealer.
 

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I've never tried a screw type link, but I also don't understand the fear of the crimp links. I've got a $20 chain crimper from amazon that works as well on my DL1000 as it did on the FZ1. Even if somehow you mess it up, a new crimp master link is a couple of bucks. As for using them to remove a chain - a cutoff wheel does the job in an instant.

 

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I think it is unlikely that the chain is causing the grabbing sensation that You are sensing. That is more likely a disc either rear or front. There is some wear on the sprocket but I have seen a lot worse. The chain looks very dry and obviously You lube it very little. Perhaps a good dousing in oil for a start followed by a good chain lube after a run might make quite a difference rather than a big spend on a possibly unnecessary chain and sprocket replacement ?
A chain can easily cause the grabby sensation. The chain I pulled off my DL1000 was missing so many O-rings that it was difficult to push around on flat ground. Even though the PO was one of those folks that thought that bathing an oring chain in lube was needed. Never seen so much crap on or near a chain - other than that pic V-tom keep posting ;)
 

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Despite being 1/4 the price, that 8MILELAKE tool looks like it would be better to use than the MotionPro PBR. Check out the size of the handle. Now that's the right way to build it.
 

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When I replaced my front sprocket (with a new, rubber cushioned one from sprocketcenter.com) I found the nut easy to remove, but then, the PO had swapped sprockets). Nevertheless, I immobilized the rear wheel with a piece of 3/4" black pipe padded with old socks wherever it touched metal parts (be careful of brake lines and wires). You will need a new bendable lock washer - get it from your dealer. Danged if I know why Suzuki turns the rim of the washer up like a flange, but it only makes bending it against the nut at the end a bit more difficult. Do this bending LAST, after everything is finished and buttoned up (except putting the chain guard and sprocket cover on). Don't ask why I warned you. I used blue locktite, not permanent red. Be careful if you heat things up, it is easy to go too hot and damage rubber parts.

I like the comment about simply cutting the chain off with a right angle grinder and cut-off wheel. You will need a chain riveting tool - the Motion Pro one is excellent; a friend broke his Amazon cheapie tool and borrowed the Mo Pro tool from another buddy to complete the job. Or, go with the screw master link or even clip type link. Obviously the riveted is best if done properly, and I've read some good things about the screw type, as well as mixed reviews of the clip type. Makes me think that it all depends on the care taken by the guy who installs the link.
 
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