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I bought a Scottoil chain oiler at Americade this year. To install it I need to cut into my vaccume line. Do i need to remove plastic panels on my 2014 dl1000 to find this tube? Any tips? Would the hose be on the left or right side of the bike?
 

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You need to pick up one of the vacuum take off points, normally used for balancing the throttle bodies. They're usually small brass things with a little black rubber cover that poke out the side of the intake stubs between the throttle body and the cylinder head.
 

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Check out the Scottoiler site - there are instructions for every bike. I recently installed a scottoiler on my 650 and as suggested by scottoiler, cut the tube from the carb to the MAPP sensor and then installed the t junction. Although fiddly, no plastic had to removed. On the UK V strom forum you can find a thread about this with a whole load of photos taken by scottoiler to help. Do get in touch with them - they are very helpful. FYI - I did not install the body under the seat , as suggested but zip tied it to the frame. This gives me more space under the seat and also means I can check oil level at a glance. You won't regret fitting this. Its nearly as good as shaft driven bike. On my last bike I only adjusted the chain once in 7000k.
 

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Glees don't have a spare vacuum port. That's why cutting an in use vacuum line is necessary. I don't know about Vee2s.
 

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The easiest spot for me was from the left side reaching up between the two cylinders. Cut the vac tube and insert "T".
 

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I've been reading about these auto chain oilers. Don't they kind of make a mess back there. Chain lubes tend to have a substance that adheres to hot metal, so not so much flinging of oil, right?
 

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Most people adjust them a little too "rich" at first. It;s hard not to want to "see" the thing is working. After you get it adjusted correctly the oil last longer and there is less mess than that caused by trying to apply enough oil with a spray can to last 1,000 miles.

BTW, we have Scott oilers at prices too low to advertise. Both the Esystem and Vsystem.

We also have the TUTORO oiler which requires no connection to either an electrical system a or vacuum system to function. It works on inertia while riding. Starts when the bike is in motion and stops when sitting still.
 

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Depends on the oiler, but they all have a range of adjustment. A higher viscosity generally just means a different setting. Same for winter and summer use. The oil is thinner in the summer (lighter setting) and thicker in the winter (heavier setting).
 

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A tip if you're using the Scottoiler brand oil...the "high temp" seems to work best at temperatures above 70-75 F. The temperatures in the morning throughout the year in San Diego are typically below 70F (except for late summer) and that just wasn't hot enough for the "high temp" oil to work well for me. I ended up just sticking with the regular blue oil and it worked great for me.
 
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