StromTrooper banner
1 - 20 of 107 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just got my first Vstrom..how often should I use chain lube? I also live at the end of a dirt/gravel road that is often muddy...would it be a good habit to spray down the bike with water to keep the dirt from getting into the chain, brakes, and other parts? or is there a better solution?

I want my new strom to last as long as possible.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,856 Posts
RTFM... :mrgreen:....That info (and much more) is in the manual... But since I have read mine, I'll help you out... It suggests lubing the chain every 1000km (600 miles) or so...In dusty conditions, lubing this and that will obviously be more frequent... If you don't have a manual... there are lots of PDF versions floating around the web...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I have a manual...i just wanted other rider's opinion's, since I have read other posts about tire pressures and stuff, which are more real world practical than what is written in the book.
 

·
FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
Joined
·
38,103 Posts
V-Tom is the guru on this. His testing determined lubing often and not cleaning at all is the best regimen. Lubing at every fuel stop and whenever the chain has gotten wet seems best. I would not put water on the chain deliberately. An automatic oiler also lengthens chain life.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,856 Posts
I have a manual...i just wanted other rider's opinion's, since I have read other posts about tire pressures and stuff, which are more real world practical than what is written in the book.
I have given you what the manual says... However, in my hurried post I forgot to add... (Obviously) the more you lube the chain, the longer it will last... I never let mine get too dry very often... If it starts to rust, you are way behind in your chain maintenance.. Botton line, no one has ever killed their chain by lubing it too much... :mrgreen:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I forgot to mention, I have a 2012, and just checked the manual from cover to cover, and it doesnt say anything about frequency of lubrication...all it mentions is that the chain should only be cleaned with kerosene...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,856 Posts
I forgot to mention, I have a 2012, and just checked the manual from cover to cover, and it doesnt say anything about frequency of lubrication...all it mentions is that the chain should only be cleaned with kerosene...
That's strange... You sure it's not in the "list of maintenance items" schedule? You know the chart that tells you when to check your valves, change oil & filter, spark plugs, etc? That's where the chain maintenance is in the 2011 manual...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
That's strange... You sure it's not in the "list of maintenance items" schedule? You know the chart that tells you when to check your valves, change oil & filter, spark plugs, etc? That's where the chain maintenance is in the 2011 manual...
my mistake...you are correct..it was buried in the middle of a chart in really small print, and I totally missed it.. I figured it would be mentioned in the chain maintenance and care paragraph...guess I need stronger glasses now.. LOL:headbang:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,452 Posts
There's no substitute for inspecting your bike. Maybe not every ride, but certainly weekly.

Look at the chain, if it's coated with dirt mixed with lube, hit it with cleaner (I like Gunk but there's plenty of others) and re-lube it. If it's just dry looking, lube alone is ok. Don't overdo the lube, a light spray between the links is sufficient.

Yes, keeping dirt off the bike will prevent premature corrosion; dirt holds moisture. Your paint and plastic will look better longer if clean, waxed, and/or "Armoralled." The process of cleaning the bike often reveals problems before they get out of hand; like a loose turn signal, or a bolt with a missing nut. Use a good car-wash like Blue Coral; detergents strip wax.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,701 Posts
My crack pot theory is that the chain is OK as long as the "o" rings are sealing the lube in and dirt out. When they fail then like a 1000 mile clock starts ticking.

If I knew I would be in dirt routinely then an automatic oiler using a lighter oil/lube would be a good deal. Scott oiler and similarly have been around for decades and you 1 pipe guys have the room to put it. A like oil would lube and clean the o=rings as the oil/dirt is slung off

excessive washing is a problem if you can't dry it almost imediately.

Not smart to wash and put away unless its really dry where you are. Mine gets washed , a short ride, and a sunshine job. If I can't dry and lube then it doesn't get washed
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,701 Posts
My crack pot theory is that the chain is OK as long as the "o" rings are sealing the lube in and dirt out. When they fail then like a 1000 mile clock starts ticking.

If I knew I would be in dirt routinely then an automatic oiler using a lighter oil/lube would be a good deal. Scott oiler and similarly have been around for decades and you 1 pipe guys have the room to put it. A light oil or ATF would lube and clean the o=rings as the oil/dirt is slung off

excessive washing is a problem if you can't dry it almost imediately.

Not smart to wash and put away unless its really dry where you are. Mine gets washed , a short ride, and a sunshine job. If I can't dry and lube then it doesn't get washed
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
523 Posts
My $.02,

Get an auto chain oiler like the cameleon or similar. Then chain maintenance becomes a non-issue.

I did it the old fashioned way on the stock chain. I lubed every 600-1000 miles and cleaned every oil change. I tried Dupont Teflon. I tried various other motorcycle chain lubes. Stock chain lasted 11,000-ish and was pretty kinky when I took it off. I replaced with a better chain with screw-type masterlink (rk). I also put on a Cameleon oiler.

Problems = ZERO. I've visually inspected the chain regularly, but it stays well lubed and clean. In winter months the oil is thicker, so you need a lighter-weight oil to flow well. In the summer you can go with 80W final drive oil. It is cheaper than the Cameleon oil and I think it is about the same viscosity.

The cost for a Cameleon or similar oiler is about $200. That seems like ALOT until you start buying those cans of spray lube. That, and the auto oilers have proven (anecdotally) to enhance chain life significantly.

I've got a few thousand miles on the new chain with the oiler and it still looks brand new.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,701 Posts
The Camelion looks like a great one for VEES.

The resevoir tube would work on 2 pipes. I tried a lube man but couldn't find any real place for the resevoir bottle unless I was willing to cut like the side panel... Its on a shelf now

I am short one cash right now but if I was planning a lot of miles I'ld be a buyer
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
78 Posts
I'm new to chain drive and I've been using Dupont Teflon Muti-use Dry, Wax Lubricant about every 300 miles and so far it's looks like working okay. Am I doing this right? any input?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
90 Posts
I'm new to chain drive and I've been using Dupont Teflon Muti-use Dry, Wax Lubricant about every 300 miles and so far it's looks like working okay. Am I doing this right? any input?
I use the same stuff.:thumbup: I lube every time I fill-up, never clean the chain, no problems. I might add I rarely get off paved roads.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
I have read many opinions and articles re: maintaining a chain. Here is my opinion and my experience: I used to have a 1200 Bandit; it had 41,000 miles when I sold it and it had the original chain. (needed replacement, but still ok) My current bike (Dl650) has over 15,000 miles, again with the original chain. I never use any lube out of a spray can. I think the goo they use is sticky so it won't fling off your chain. However, it attracts dirt and grit which can grind your chain to death. I see bikes for sale all the time that state they have a new chain/sprockets, but have less than 15,000 miles. Why? I have always used 80/90 weight gear oil, just like the owners manual says. I may spray WD-40 on a rag and wipe it down first, sometimes I may totally clean the chain with a brush and Kerosene. But every 300 to 400 miles I lube the chain with gear oil using a pump oil can. I put one drop on the middle of each link, and coat each side of each link. Yes, it drips onto the garage floor overnight, and I have to be careful not to park it on friends driveways who I may visit, but my chain is clean, shiny and lasts. Also, the oil that does "fling" onto your wheel or elsewhere is easy to wipe off, at least compared to that sticky canned stuff. What a pain getting that off your wheels. I get my gear oil at Auto Zone, but you can find it anywhere.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
523 Posts
I have read many opinions and articles re: maintaining a chain. Here is my opinion and my experience: I used to have a 1200 Bandit; it had 41,000 miles when I sold it and it had the original chain. (needed replacement, but still ok) My current bike (Dl650) has over 15,000 miles, again with the original chain. I never use any lube out of a spray can. I think the goo they use is sticky so it won't fling off your chain. However, it attracts dirt and grit which can grind your chain to death. I see bikes for sale all the time that state they have a new chain/sprockets, but have less than 15,000 miles. Why? I have always used 80/90 weight gear oil, just like the owners manual says. I may spray WD-40 on a rag and wipe it down first, sometimes I may totally clean the chain with a brush and Kerosene. But every 300 to 400 miles I lube the chain with gear oil using a pump oil can. I put one drop on the middle of each link, and coat each side of each link. Yes, it drips onto the garage floor overnight, and I have to be careful not to park it on friends driveways who I may visit, but my chain is clean, shiny and lasts. Also, the oil that does "fling" onto your wheel or elsewhere is easy to wipe off, at least compared to that sticky canned stuff. What a pain getting that off your wheels. I get my gear oil at Auto Zone, but you can find it anywhere.
I agree with Lou on this. Gear oil seems the best to me as well. It is what I am using in my cameleon oiler and works great. I use the cameleon oiler because, honestly, I'm lazy and like the convenience. But doing the 80W gear oil as Lou does will give same results as having a cameleon. :thumbup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
489 Posts
I'm new to chain drive and I've been using Dupont Teflon Muti-use Dry, Wax Lubricant about every 300 miles and so far it's looks like working okay. Am I doing this right? any input?
I did the same for my first chain and got 20k. Plan to do the same for my new chain.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
4,057 Posts
I just got my first Vstrom..how often should I use chain lube? I also live at the end of a dirt/gravel road that is often muddy...would it be a good habit to spray down the bike with water to keep the dirt from getting into the chain, brakes, and other parts? or is there a better solution?

I want my new strom to last as long as possible.
1) your strom will last you a long time.
2) about chain maintenance:
You should lube your chain after every ride or every 250 kms.
That being said, most of the lube will fling off right away or stay on there and collect dirt (depending on the lube you use).
the only really viable solution (according to me and others who use the same solution) is to use an automatic chain oiler.
I use a scottoiler and fill it with ATF. My chains last a really long time.
3) spraying the bike with water just makes it wet. My strom's only been washed when it's been to the dealer (they need to justify that 100$ oil change somehow). I haven't washed my bike since early 2009, and I plan on keeping it another ten or twenty years. I've had lots of bikes before this wee (I have about 1.5 million kilometres of riding under my belt), and in my experience, the biggest factor in bike longevity has been riding it every day.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
94 Posts
I have read many opinions and articles re: maintaining a chain. Here is my opinion and my experience: I used to have a 1200 Bandit; it had 41,000 miles when I sold it and it had the original chain. (needed replacement, but still ok) My current bike (Dl650) has over 15,000 miles, again with the original chain. I never use any lube out of a spray can. I think the goo they use is sticky so it won't fling off your chain. However, it attracts dirt and grit which can grind your chain to death. I see bikes for sale all the time that state they have a new chain/sprockets, but have less than 15,000 miles. Why? I have always used 80/90 weight gear oil, just like the owners manual says. I may spray WD-40 on a rag and wipe it down first, sometimes I may totally clean the chain with a brush and Kerosene. But every 300 to 400 miles I lube the chain with gear oil using a pump oil can. I put one drop on the middle of each link, and coat each side of each link. Yes, it drips onto the garage floor overnight, and I have to be careful not to park it on friends driveways who I may visit, but my chain is clean, shiny and lasts. Also, the oil that does "fling" onto your wheel or elsewhere is easy to wipe off, at least compared to that sticky canned stuff. What a pain getting that off your wheels. I get my gear oil at Auto Zone, but you can find it anywhere.

Why not Wally World chainsaw bar oil? it's not only cheaper THAN 80/90W, but it has the non-sling factor built in.
 
1 - 20 of 107 Posts
Top