StromTrooper banner

1 - 20 of 64 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
303 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
The shop manual says, because of the "O" rings in the stock chain, ONLY kerosene should be used for cleaning and ONLY heavy duty motor oil should be used to 'grease' the chain. Anyone here at odds with that? I thought some type of SPRAY chain lube would be specified but I suppose I could carry around a small vial of Harley (50 WT) Oil.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
332 Posts
I never cleaned my chain between services - but lubed the chain with Silkolene Titanium Gel every 1000 km. No discernible wear in over 64 000 km.

I'll maintain the same regime on my newer SUZI II. It seems to work okay.

Doug
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,925 Posts
The Tutoro is on my short list of new farkles. My schedule has been lube with Dupont teflon chain saver every 200 miles, clean with Gunk engine degreaser every 3000 miles. 42,000 miles on chain and I'm betting it will probably go 50,000+.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
121 Posts
Ah NO!!!! Here we go again with another chain maintenance thread. Do us all a favor, don't look at it, don't touch it, don't adjust it and certainly don't lubricate the damn thing. It will probably end up being the only thing on the bike still functioning after 5 millions miles.........

Just saying.......
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,057 Posts
Lubing often (I do after every fill-up and after every ride in the rain) has allowed the chains on my DL650's to last from 40,000 to almost 50,000 miles. I use Wurth HHS2000 but think the important thing is the frequency. I don't ever bother cleaning my chain as it doesn't do anything useful anyway.

A chain oiler that keeps the chain constantly lubed should give the best results.

..Tom
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
226 Posts
The Tutoro is on my short list of new farkles. My schedule has been lube with Dupont teflon chain saver every 200 miles, clean with Gunk engine degreaser every 3000 miles. 42,000 miles on chain and I'm betting it will probably go 50,000+.
Daaang... what chain do you have on? ... not the OEM I'd presume.

I baby-sit mine, last one started to kink around 20k. I don't torque the thing hard, but ride most of the time at highway speeds. but 50k!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,057 Posts
The shop manual says, because of the "O" rings in the stock chain, ONLY kerosene should be used for cleaning and ONLY heavy duty motor oil should be used to 'grease' the chain. Anyone here at odds with that? I thought some type of SPRAY chain lube would be specified but I suppose I could carry around a small vial of Harley (50 WT) Oil.
While there are a lot of threads on the subject it's good you ask as how to take care of your chain as the web is full of lots of misinformation. (Don't let those that don't understand how to skip a thread deter you from asking although it is good form to look around first and see if a subject has been discussed.)

As I have said previously I don't think the type of lube matters that much. If you do want ot use Harley Chain Lube here is what you are looking for:



:)

..Tom
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
508 Posts
The shop manual says, because of the "O" rings in the stock chain, ONLY kerosene should be used for cleaning and ONLY heavy duty motor oil should be used to 'grease' the chain. Anyone here at odds with that? I thought some type of SPRAY chain lube would be specified but I suppose I could carry around a small vial of Harley (50 WT) Oil.
I will occasionally use wd40 to clean the chain. Cleaning the chain is not a high priority. Oiling is. At home I will use 80W gear oil, on the road any reputable o-ring chain oil (Belray, castrol, PJ). I have the bad habit of prematurely changing my chain and even then I easily get 35,000 km (22000miles). On the road I will oil every 2nd fillup.

Get a good chain ( in my case DID). Your sprockets will wear out first.

Brian
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,103 Posts
Prior to the purchase, I really should have remembered the time honored lazy man's adage: Never invest in anything that eats, needs painting, or involves a chain of any sort.
Too late now.
If it rains, lube the chain.
If you wash the bike, lube the chain.
If none of that happens, lube the chain every couple fillups.
And then congratulate yourself with a couple beers.
You're a fine human being, and an example for all to emulate as best they can.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,019 Posts
The Tutoro is on my short list of new farkles. My schedule has been lube with Dupont teflon chain saver every 200 miles, clean with Gunk engine degreaser every 3000 miles. 42,000 miles on chain and I'm betting it will probably go 50,000+.
Many engine degreasers contain Quartz silica Crystalline, an abrasive. Mild enough not to do much damage short term, but long term possible buildup could.
However you do seem to be getting good mileage out of your chain.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,925 Posts
Ah NO!!!! Here we go again with another chain maintenance thread. Do us all a favor, don't look at it, don't touch it, don't adjust it and certainly don't lubricate the damn thing. It will probably end up being the only thing on the bike still functioning after 5 millions miles.........

Just saying.......
I've suggested twice making this subject a sticky but the powers that be have ignored me. :???:
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
16,878 Posts
I've suggested twice making this subject a sticky but the powers that be have ignored me. :???:
Its not falling on deaf ears......same could easily be said for "what tires to buy". Let me see what I can come up with, as I too am getting quite annoyed with all of the chain lube and maintenance threads that pop up which seems like every few days.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,039 Posts
I guess I've used spray lubes on 4 chains now. I averaged spray lube every 400 to 600 miles, or once a day touring. The only advantage over an oiler I've seen is a cleaner bike, but spray lube always gives me shorter chain life. I like the Original Bike Spirits chain lube, its very much like the Dupont Dry Lube yet it sticks better. Honda Pro has some good chain lubes, the normal one is good for pavement pounders. Always disliked Maxima chain wax and those like it, they attract way too much dirt.

Chains lubed with 30 weight in winter and gear lube in the summer just stretched beyond service life. No sudden failures, no rollers spitting out as I ride. There are benefits to using the oil method and just wiping the chain down if it every needs it. Oiled chains stay clean on their own actually. I just don't like doing the oil method manually, but a loobman or tutoro manual is less than $40 right now I think. Doesn't take long to be budget friendly, oil is cheap too.

I've found my counter sprocket is hooked bad by 12,000 miles, I try and put a new one on at 10,000. That helps with chain life. With the Turtoro Auto out now, its reasonable to run an automatic oiler, no vacumn tie in like the Scotts, very simple install.

The big thing is checking for stretch and condition every tire change at least. Don't run a chain beyond its specification, measure the sucker occasionally. If its all red inside the side plates or an o-ring is missing or a roller is cracked, get a new chain. I've had one fail on the road, it ain't pleasant.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
16,878 Posts
I guess I've used spray lubes on 4 chains now. I averaged spray lube every 400 to 600 miles, or once a day touring. The only advantage over an oiler I've seen is a cleaner bike, but spray lube always gives me shorter chain life. I like the Original Bike Spirits chain lube, its very much like the Dupont Dry Lube yet it sticks better. Honda Pro has some good chain lubes, the normal one is good for pavement pounders. Always disliked Maxima chain wax and those like it, they attract way too much dirt.

Chains lubed with 30 weight in winter and gear lube in the summer just stretched beyond service life. No sudden failures, no rollers spitting out as I ride. There are benefits to using the oil method and just wiping the chain down if it every needs it. Oiled chains stay clean on their own actually. I just don't like doing the oil method manually, but a loobman or tutoro manual is less than $40 right now I think. Doesn't take long to be budget friendly, oil is cheap too.

I've found my counter sprocket is hooked bad by 12,000 miles, I try and put a new one on at 10,000. That helps with chain life. With the Turtoro Auto out now, its reasonable to run an automatic oiler, no vacumn tie in like the Scotts, very simple install.

The big thing is checking for stretch and condition every tire change at least. Don't run a chain beyond its specification, measure the sucker occasionally. If its all red inside the side plates or an o-ring is missing or a roller is cracked, get a new chain. I've had one fail on the road, it ain't pleasant.
Something is not right, I went through a chain and a half on my 1000 and the front sprocket still looked decent. :confused:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,102 Posts
Ignore the manual suggested - especially the motor oil (that's a dirt magnet)....there's plenty on this site regarding what people use to keep corrosion at bay on the outside of the chain - use the search. That said, the O-rings exist to keep the lube exactly where the chain manufacturer wants the lube. The chain requires no other additional lubrication - I've written the tech dept. of a few O-ring chain mfg'rs to get their say on it, and they unanimously agree that O-ring chains don't require the user to lube the chain - only that IF they spray it down, wipe off the excess (to prevent dust/dirt sticking), and go ride for 20,000 miles til it's worn out.

Sure, if you like a clean chain, kerosene works fine, some use simple green. Dirt is the enemy of the somewhat delicate O-rings, so be careful of using lubes (motor oil, sticky motocross non-o'ring chain lubes) that dirt sticks to - you will create an abrasive paste exactly where you don't want (on the O-rings)...and if you want to keep the rollers from getting rusty, select your fave lube and apply as needed to keep the rust/corrosion at bay. I will add, that the rollers do not rotate, but merely protect the chain pins and fit into the chainring grooves - that's all they do - no lube needed underneath, since the rotation is negligible (according to the chain mfg. techs).

I do use Dupont teflon spray lube (sold at lowe's or home depot), since it's cheap, doesn't hold dirt/dust, and keeps the rust off my chain's side plates/rollers/etc.
 
1 - 20 of 64 Posts
Top