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Chain lube: more fling=more protection

6782 Views 20 Replies 16 Participants Last post by  richw
It makes sense.

I read i tin an article about chain maintenance (can't find it right now).

Oil flinging off the chain is messy, but it is mostly messy because it takes the dirt off your chain.

Basically, the story is that lube that stays on the chain attracts dirt and doesn't lube well while lube that flings off takes the fresh dirt with it and gets replaced with fresh oil.

Seems sound to me...
I use ATF in my Scottoiler, and my chain is pretty clean after 30,000kms (even though I never cleaned it). My sidecases, license plate and swingarm are a different story...
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It makes sense.

I read i tin an article about chain maintenance (can't find it right now).

Oil flinging off the chain is messy, but it is mostly messy because it takes the dirt off your chain.

Basically, the story is that lube that stays on the chain attracts dirt and doesn't lube well while lube that flings off takes the fresh dirt with it and gets replaced with fresh oil.

Seems sound to me...
I use ATF in my Scottoiler, and my chain is pretty clean after 30,000kms (even though I never...
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It makes sense.

I read i tin an article about chain maintenance (can't find it right now).

Oil flinging off the chain is messy, but it is mostly messy because it takes the dirt off your chain.

Basically, the story is that lube that stays on the chain attracts dirt and doesn't lube well while lube that flings off takes the fresh dirt with it and gets replaced with fresh oil.

Seems sound to me...
I use ATF in my Scottoiler, and my chain is pretty clean after 30,000kms (even though I never cleaned it). My sidecases, license plate and swingarm are a different story...

I use chainsaw bar oil.
 

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Logic would suggest that the vast majority of the oil would get slung off the chain on the first ride after it is first applied (unless you're using an oiler), then collect dirt while it is stuck to your swingarm or fender. I'll stick with the teflon lube.
 

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Show me the data...

An oil thread by any other name ... :biggrinjester:

Chain lube performance is a component metric that isn't meaningful by itself. What we really want to know is how the useful life of the chain is affected. Until someone is willing to perform controlled tests of different lubes under exactly the same conditions for tens of thousands of miles, we're never going to know whether stickiness or flinginess is better. :fineprint:
 

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I've used sticky stuff in the past in the dirt and was amazed at the junk that clung to my chain. Grains of sand that required a good cleaning with solvent and a brush to remove. As one who doesn't want to spend much time cleaning my chain I prefer a dry lube like Dupont teflon. Probably doesn't matter much in the street what you use but you don't want something sticky for occasional forays into the dry dusty stuff.
 

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What about all that crap flung into the front sprocket area ? 25,000 km and only a tablespoon of DuPont accummulated in the bike. That's my kind of fling.
 

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45,000km to date on my original chain and sprockets [the sprockets are not very worn, the chain is starting to get a little bit stiff in a couple of links].

I started off using CRC White Lithium Grease [comes in a spray can], then I switched to using Nulon Extreme L90 [comes in a tube, very easy to carry and apply- sort of like a cream and is specifically made for demanding conditions, like chains on farm equipment and other applications].

I don't clean the chain [although the workshop where I get my services done tends to do it, even though I ask them not to :headbang: - and they lube the clutch cable, which is a no-no on the Wee as it is Teflon coated and shouldn't be lubed :fineprint: and I don't believe in oiling cables as it only gums them up].

Today I have oiled the chain with ordinary engine oil to see if it gets in to the kinked links enough to free them up, I'd really like to push this chain and sprockets through to 50,000km just to prove a point :biggrinjester:


No major scalloping in the valleys of the sprocket.



There are only about two spots on the chain where the links are kinking.



But the kinks are easy to flatten as they are not binding tight.



You can see in this shot that the teeth still have the flat, square ends- not yet going pointy. [I'm almost tempted to just put a cheap chain on until the sprockets wear out then go for a full set of stock ones again :bom_rolleyes4: ].

Just out of curiosity, has anyone got more than 45,000km on a single set of chain and sprockets? [and mine is the original Suzuki stuff, I bought the bike new straight off the showroom floor].
 

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then I switched to using Nulon Extreme L90 [comes in a tube, very easy to carry and apply.
This is the MAIN reason that I don't use Teflon SPRAY! I have had two aerosol cans go off in my topcase. One was not my fault, the other was.

I will not carry, or use spray style chain lube anymore!
 

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Sorry to tell you ock but that chain is stuffed. My constantly oiled chain is up to 18,000 kl without needing cleaning or adjusting, the wheel needs a quick spray with mr sheen and a wipe each month.

Yes, I know it is.

I have emailed Blair at SV Racing about a chain and sprockets and the cost of getting them posted out here to Oz.

But 45,000km is pretty damned good, and the sprockets would do as emergency spares still.
 

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I am one my first replacement chain, got 21k on the stocker, this one seems to be in very good shape still, went to the heavier GSXR chain and sprockets this time around. Here is a run down of the old tutorial I posted, but with out pics.

I did mine last night, no pics do to excessively greasy hands. But if this can help ya'll. Here was my process.

Job done, took all of 2.5 hours. Mostly allot of grease cleaning, hub, clutch, etc.

1:I started by fully loosening the axle nut and rear slack adjusters all the way forward, then I removed the countershaft nut. Broke the old chain using chain breaker.

2: Removed rear wheel assembly and chain. Cleaned rear wheel, and removed old cush drive cushions ( I wanted to replace mine, cheap insurance).

3: Removed old sprockets.

4: Sprayed some silicone lubricant on new cush drives and push the rubber pins into hub. Mounted new sprockets, used blue locktite on rear sprocket nuts, and torqued. Mounted chain, determined how many links needed to be removed, and removed them. Remount chain and pulled the 2 ends together using a nylon zip tie to secure the ends prior to riveting master link install( Very greasy, the zip will hold everything together for ya, pull it tight, and try to match the master link, pin to pin).

5: Used a vernier micrometer to mic the pin diameter of the master link pins. Prior to riveting, diameter was .210".

6: Installed master link, again I verified adjacent link width with Micrometer, .790". I then used Mikes tool ( Study the tool, and insure you have the proper press faces in the proper positon) to press on the side plates after greasing the pins of the new master. Once pressed on, link width was verified to be .785"

7: Flaired pin ends using mikes tool(Be sure to grease the staking pin on the tool, prior to tightening), final pin diameter after flairing was .220" on both pins.

8: Adjusted slack, and used anti sieze on axle threads, tourque nut and installed hitch pin on castle nut.

9: Button up clutch assembly, and replaced countersprocket cover.

10: Test ride; I used an EK 525 chain which was about 1/16" wider than the stocker, I think the plates and pins are more substancial than the stocker although it is still a 525 pitch. I also changed the final ratio to 15/45 or 3.0 final ratio, versus the stock 15/48 which has a 3.2 final ratio. I had tried the 16T countershaft sprocket previously and found it too tall for my liking, although the final ratio 16/48 (3.0) is the same, I found the engine was not quick to rev and more wind up time insued.
With the 15/45 combo, the engine is more responsive, easier on tires, and perhaps fuel (Compared to the 16/48 setup). I feel it will still be managable on dirt roads, and 2 up riding. Tight trails will be another story and will require carrying more speed in order to maintain the proper RPM's for the engine design.

I used an EK MVXZ chain in gold. Its a low stretch design some strommer where raving about in other forums. I matched this to the stock OEM suzuki countershaft sprocket, and an aluminum 45 tooth in black.

Purchased here: Motorcycle Parts Sportbike Roadracing Accessories for Suzuki GSXR 1000 TLR TL1000, Yamaha R1 R6 R7 OWO1, Honda CB1000RR, Kawasaki ZX10 FREE SHIPPING

Item Numbers from site:
Rear Sprocket 525 Suzuki - Anodized Aluminum Alloy - See Application Chart for Models 5017-525 1
Sprocket Color: Black Black 1
Rear Sprocket Size: 45 teeth 1

--Chain Breaker DBRAK 1 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Driven USA 525 MVXZ Drive Chain - GOLD or CHROME 525MVXZBC/BG 1
Chain Length: 120 links 1
Chain Color: Gold

I had people claim my gearing choice is still the same as the final ratio is still 3.0, but I differ and looking back at some of the older post such as what does you speedo indicate at 6000 rpm, mine showed a higher MPH,which I validated with my ZUMO in the 650 dlforum posted here a couple of weeks ago, 54 miles per gallon.

Anyway, back to the question. I use the dupont teflon spray available at lows, lube it at less than 400mile intervals, or when I run in the rain, or when I run all day as I believe the heatbreaks down the lube. I lube it when its still hot and let it set up overnight. I also clean my chaine at least 2 times a year with Karo and a grundge bush. If I get 20 K out of new chain and sprockets I am happy, anything over that...I dance around the campfire with and open mug of brewsky...only for about 5 minutes then I forget why I am dancing....which reminds me...hehe
 

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This is the MAIN reason that I don't use Teflon SPRAY! I have had two aerosol cans go off in my topcase. One was not my fault, the other was.

I will not carry, or use spray style chain lube anymore!
Dupont teflon is also available in a 4 oz (liquid) bottle. A little lighter for travel.

I have experienced leaking cans of chain spray.
 

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Yes, I know it is.

I have emailed Blair at SV Racing about a chain and sprockets and the cost of getting them posted out here to Oz.

But 45,000km is pretty damned good, and the sprockets would do as emergency spares still.
My first two chains lasted 34,000 km and 38,000 km. Maintained as per factory (clean with kerosene htne lubed at 1,000 km.

My last chain was replaced at about 75,000 km, or about 46,500 miles. The front sprocket was well beyond it's useful service life but the chain had some life left in it.

The difference? The last chain was Never cleaned (the most it got was a superficial wipe with a dry cloth off when checking the chain) and lubed with HHS2000 with every tank of gas and every ride in the rain. It was not adjusted until around 50,000 or 60,000 km, and that as a result of a crash where I was checking that the rear wheel was aligned corectly. I don't know that the HHS2000 was the reason it lasted (I suspect any good oil based product would do the same) but I think the constant lubing as well as not cleaning was the reason. I suspect that any cleaning that can do anything useful has the potential of doing more harm than good.

Don't clean, just lube it often.

..Tom
 

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And a torch.

WD40 Torch - YouTube


Looking it up, most brands seem to offer motorcycle chains as another recommended use. But I'll apply with the engine off: I still have all 10 fingers....

I've considered bar & chain oil in my scottoiler, but viscosity is inconsistent between brands, with ATF, viscosity is consistent and very little fiddling is required to keep the drip rate even



 
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