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Discussion Starter #41
I have over 20000 miles now and have only tightened the chain maybe 3 times, always within it's free play tolerance, not anal at all with my chains, when it starts making noise I squirt it down with chain lube....No telling how long the chain is going to last....amazing.....
My guess is not much longer. I would replace it before you go on any long trips.

..Tom
 

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I just noticed that late this past Sunday I turned over 45,000 MILES on my OEM chain (and on the my 2015 DL1000 as well.)

I think it is close to needing it's first tightening since the front sprocket was replaced just short of 18,000 miles (A bit earlier than I should have done but was changing the rear tire so made sense to do then.) Chain looks great!

I don't know if you will be able to zoom in enough and see how dirty the chain area is (sand and salt are common this time of year up here) but it looks pretty typical.



..Tom
Nothing to do with chains, but is that water always that close to those houses? Looks like about a one-foot rise and it would be in that house on the right.
 

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Discussion Starter #43
Nothing to do with chains, but is that water always that close to those houses? Looks like about a one-foot rise and it would be in that house on the right.
The furthest building is actually an old Mill and the "stream" is the millway that fed the water (is that the right term?). Behind me (and a bit to my right is a river that feeds from Rice Lake and directly to my right is a dam that controls the level. I haven't heard of any real flooding there (I used to live about 10 or so miles from there down the lake but really didn't pay much attention. The picture is in Hastings, Ontario.

..Tom
 

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oil for chain oiler

I have a Loobman on my bike ( LoobMan Motorcycle Chain Oiler Loobman chain-oiler - Home page ) and it is working great, I replaced the dual feed nozzle this year with the Tutoro one, cost about $10USD for the nozzle and the rest around $20USD or maybe a little more, but affordable.

My chain is at 24k km now and I just swapped out front sprocket, but chain and rear look new. I am considering bringing a spare chain and sprockets for my trip up North though, just in case, or I might have one here in a box and my wife can ship it up to me if needed to save on weight issues. The chain wears quick on 12 hour days.
Bugzy what kind of oil are you using in your chain oiler? Got Pic of your setup? :nerd:
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Bugzy what kind of oil are you using in your chain oiler? Got Pic of your setup? :nerd:
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I am just using 10w40 in it, it could be a little thicker perhaps, but this is working fine. I use dyno oil, not sure if synthetic would be better for a chain or not.

The only downside is that it gets on the rear rim, but that is easily cleaned off with WD40.

The install goes straight down pretty much, and it has a dual head nozzle on the rear sprocket that needs cleaning and adjusting partway through trips usually. WD40 takes care of that easily.



 

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Discussion Starter #46
I had the OEM Chain and the sprockets changed yesterday. Front was second sprocket, rear was original.

My mileage was 76,180 km or 47,336 miles.

The chain and rear sprocket were in excellent condition and my mechanic said there was no reason not to use it for another 20,000 km/12,000 miles or more.

I decided to change it anyway since we were doing both tires and the front sprocket needed to be changed. For the new chain (Oem replacement kit) I will aim for 100,000 km or 62,000 miles.

..Tom
 

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I was about to say synthetic would not make any difference whatsoever... because the oil is not around long enough to degrade like it does in an engine, but then I remembered that the reason conventional oil burns off faster than synthetic is the presence of shorter chain molecules and those shorter chain molecules are more solvent like than the longer chain molecules.



What good is a forum if we can't make something of nothing?
 

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P.S.

We started carrying the TUTORO automatic (autonomous) chain oiler at the request of a member of the community. It wasn't available in the US. A previous distributor wimped out when he saw the import fees. I love mine and think it is the best auto oiler out there.

.... but if you just want a manual oiler... The Loobman is the way to go (IMO). Excellent pricing and it's getting better with each iteration. Their original delivery nozzle sucked, but it was easy to make a better one. Not sure about the newest model's nozzle.
 

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Consider using a 75W-90 gear oil and reducing the flow rate. The gear oil has more anti-wear additives than engine oil. 90 weight gear oil is about the same actual viscosity as 40 wt engine oil. The *90* tells us that it's gear oil, not engine oil. All SAE viscosity grades from 70 and and up are gear oils. 0 to 60 viscosity grade are engine oils. I see no advantage to a synthetic lube for the chain. You might try a home brew with some chain saw chain & bar oil mixed with the gear oil. The chainsaw oil has tackifiers to make it sticky. If the combination is too thick, mix in a bit of kerosene to cut it.
 

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I had the OEM Chain and the sprockets changed yesterday. Front was second sprocket, rear was original.

My mileage was 76,180 km or 47,336 miles.

The chain and rear sprocket were in excellent condition and my mechanic said there was no reason not to use it for another 20,000 km/12,000 miles or more.

I decided to change it anyway since we were doing both tires and the front sprocket needed to be changed. For the new chain (Oem replacement kit) I will aim for 100,000 km or 62,000 miles.

..Tom
So Tom are you using an OEM front sprocket? Just curious as to wearing faster than the rear...Maybe sludge inside the front sprocket cover?

Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk
 

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So Tom are you using an OEM front sprocket? Just curious as to wearing faster than the rear...Maybe sludge inside the front sprocket cover?
Front sprockets usually wear faster (at least in my experience) because they are smaller, and make about 2.5 times more revolutions than the rear sprocket. Hence, each tooth is making that many more "engagements" with the chain. Also, there is probably more stress at the points of chain engagement, since there is less area and the radius is smaller.
 

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Discussion Starter #54
So Tom are you using an OEM front sprocket? Just curious as to wearing faster than the rear...Maybe sludge inside the front sprocket cover?
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Mcrag said what I would have said what I said.

As far as which sprocket I bought a Suzuki kit which has OEM chain and both front and back OEM sprockets. I also bought an aftermarket front at the same time. I don't spend even the remotest thought as to whether it's factory or aftermarket as long as they are steel not cheap crap. I have never noticed any difference between aftermarket front sprockets and the factory ones with the dampers in them. I suspect that some here with more discerning sensitivities might be able to tell the difference but I can't.


..Tom
 

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Any opinions of using a beefier chain? For my second chain I went from the stock 525 to a 530. The 530 should be stronger since the plates are wider but it seems to have worn out at about the same rate. For me that's around 25K miles (lots of lubing, little cleaning).

I just changed the chain again and went back to the 525 since it's lighter and less costly.

pkstrom
 

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Any opinions of using a beefier chain? For my second chain I went from the stock 525 to a 530. The 530 should be stronger since the plates are wider but it seems to have worn out at about the same rate. For me that's around 25K miles (lots of lubing, little cleaning).

I just changed the chain again and went back to the 525 since it's lighter and less costly.

pkstrom
Phillip,
Hope all is well with you and your lovely wife. I have always been fine with replacing chains, sprockets, oil filters and air filters with the manufacturer's parts. Hey, they did the testing on these parts prior to production. On my '14 1000, I replaced the chain and sprockets at 25000 miles. The parts could gave lasted longer, but I wanted to have new parts prior to a long trip. If I remember correctly, dealer charged $180 total- a reasonable price to pay to restore the drive train. Works for me:smile2:
 

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Discussion Starter #57
For what it's worth I replaced the Front Sprocket yesterday:



60,754 km/37,750 miles. I meant to do it a few weeks ago but didn't have the chance until now so it is a bit past prime (but nowhere near my worst!) I replaced the sprocket with one from the OEM chain kit and have ordered a replacement sprocket (I told them whatever is less expensive as long as it's steel.) The front sprocket housing wasn't actually terribly full of crap. Maybe three or four tablespoons in total if that.

The chain has the same 60,754km/37,750 miles and looks great so I think it is more than reasonable to aim for 100,000 km/62,000 miles.

BTW an electric Impact wrench sure makes taking off the big bolts on the rear axle and sprocket very easy!

..Tom
 

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I've had horrible luck with chains and sprockets on the Strom. Not one has lasted over 10k. I've got almost 50k on my bike now. I have had some bad luck with sprockets too. One sprocket had 3 teeth shear off with less than 5k on it. Vendor replaced free of charge.

I've finally bitten the bullet on the latest chain. I now have a Tuturo chain oiler and I have went to the beefier 530 chain. I'm hoping this can get me in the 15 to 20k range on the current chain and sprockets.

I'm not overly ham-fisted with the throttle. I own several other bikes, including a Hayabusa, and have not had any issues with short chain life.

I'm hoping this set up works out.
 

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:surprise: Something is afoot. I have 14,000 miles on my V2 and the dealer said it has no noticeable wear on the sprockets or chain when I had the ECU changed. I just spray it with Chain Saver every fill-up for about two minutes as I spin the tire. I adjusted the chain once just past 12,500 miles but kept it on the loose side.

I've had horrible luck with chains and sprockets on the Strom. Not one has lasted over 10k. I've got almost 50k on my bike now. I have had some bad luck with sprockets too. One sprocket had 3 teeth shear off with less than 5k on it. Vendor replaced free of charge.

I've finally bitten the bullet on the latest chain. I now have a Tuturo chain oiler and I have went to the beefier 530 chain. I'm hoping this can get me in the 15 to 20k range on the current chain and sprockets.

I'm not overly ham-fisted with the throttle. I own several other bikes, including a Hayabusa, and have not had any issues with short chain life.

I'm hoping this set up works out.
 

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Discussion Starter #60
I've had horrible luck with chains and sprockets on the Strom. Not one has lasted over 10k. I've got almost 50k on my bike now. I have had some bad luck with sprockets too. One sprocket had 3 teeth shear off with less than 5k on it. Vendor replaced free of charge.
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I don't know what you have been doing but hope you stop it! I did a survey about 10 years ago and people that basically did nothing (no even lubing!) still got in the 20,000 mile range out of chain and sprockets.

Assuming you are not killing the chain by "cleaning" it with a brush I would wonder if you are running the chain way too tight.

I lube my chains after every fill up and after every ride in the rain using Wurth HHS2000 (takes literally 10 to 15 seconds on the centerstand), never "clean" my chains, ride on gravel roads pretty much daily. Chains on my bike have been replaced in the 40,000 to 50,000 mile range and have generally had decent life left in them. Front sprockets generally are done around 35,--- to 40,000 miles. I am aiming for 60,000 miles/100,000 km on the current chain.

..Tom
 
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