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I have been posting for a while that the secret to chain life is to not worry about cleaning the chain but to lube with every tank of gas and after every ride in the rain. Doing that on my DL650's meant I could realistically expect my chain to last somewhere between 40,000 and 50,000 miles. While I expected the same to be true in the V2 I couldn't speak from experience on the matter.

I forgot to post this when it happened a week or two ago but I have over 40,000 miles on the original factory stock chain. I don't see why it can't last to perhaps 50,000 miles or more. The chain has only had one very minor adjustment as the front sprocket wore and I replaced the front sprocket at 27,000 miles as a precaution. It probably had at least another 5,000 miles but was showing the first little bit of hooking.

In case you missed my rants on the subject here is how I take care of my chain:

I literally never have cleaned the chain. I use Wurth HHS2000 (called HHS2k in the USA) but I think the main thing is to lube it often.

I lube with every fill up and after every ride in the rain. My procedure is to turn off the bike in neutral. I put it on the centre-stand and then spin the wheel with my left hand while gently spraying my lube with my right hand on the sides of the rollers and where the links touch. This takes literally 10 or 20 seconds.

That's it..nothing else is needed to be done.

Oil based lube makes sense to me as that is what is inside the rollers so I have never used anything else. I ride on some sort of unpaved roads almost every day. I ride in cold weather where my roads are covered with salt (I saw the first sings if "brining" today.) I ride in rain routinely. I had one ride where my wife (riding pillion) and I rode for several miles on a beach in North Carolina looking for wild horses. The tide started coming in so we turned around and just before we got off the beach we rode in salt water as well. The chain was never cleaned and sand was all over it until we rode heavy rains few days later.

..Tom
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Sometimes people suggest I only ride on nice paved road in ideal conditions so here's a picture of me taking it off the beach:



And here is how the chain looked:




..Tom
 

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V-Tom,

Thank you for sharing this.

For everyone else, if you just can't stand it and want to clean your chain, just wipe it down with motor oil on a rag. Never use a degreaser or WD-40!

If you are not disciplined enough to oil your chain after every fill up (a rare and special breed of which I am not!) consider one of these.

Tutoro Chain Oilers - AdventureTech, LLC. Just attach, adjust, and ride.

On a separate note, I have seen no indication of the need for the rear wheel spacer fix on any Vee2.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
So are you saving any money? Sounds like the money you are saving on chains, you give back to buying chain lube. Lol. Just kidding.
Well my chain lube is pretty inexpensive.. work gives it to me. Still if it wasn't I don't have the time and aggravation of waiting for my chain to be replaced. (I don't do it myself as I have a tech that does it while I wait so I would much rather pay him the $50 to get it done. It still takes me an extra half hour each way in traffic to get to my mechanic and if he has jobs in progress I will have to wait. Mind you he has Pinball machines and he is a character so the wait isn't terrible.)

For me it isn't about the cost but rather about the bother.. the 10 or 20 seconds spraying my chain is a minor amount of time and effort to keep the chain lasting a long time.

..Tom
 

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...For me it isn't about the cost but rather about the bother.. the 10 or 20 seconds spraying my chain is a minor amount of time and effort to keep the chain lasting a long time.

..Tom
Yeah, and not having to go through the chain and sprocket change hassles as often.

I agree with your method, btw.
 

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i just bought a scottoiler
 

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i just bought a scottoiler
I would love to know how it works out for you... that is how long the chain lasts. From what I have understood (but not tried) the chain oilier should keep the chain well lubed and should help the chain to last a long time. In theory probably longer than what I do.

From what I have read, the specs on RichlandRick's Tutoro Chain oiler sound really good and if I wasn't so lazy I would probably try one out.

..Tom
 

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That Wurth lube aint cheap, would be over $30 shipped........it aint that good. ;)
 

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I would love to know how it works out for you... that is how long the chain lasts. From what I have understood (but not tried) the chain oilier should keep the chain well lubed and should help the chain to last a long time. In theory probably longer than what I do.

From what I have read, the specs on RichlandRick's Tutoro Chain oiler sound really good and if I wasn't so lazy I would probably try one out.

..Tom
i have had it for about 3.5k and it worked great!
although just about a 2 weeks ago i noticed that it stopped oiling even though it shows like it is (when i prime it it works ) i need to disconnect it from the battery for an hour but didn't have time to deal with it right now
 

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That Wurth lube aint cheap, would be over $30 shipped........it aint that good. ;)
Ouch!

Last I looked it was under $20 Canadian $.

I have been told that the frequency of lube is the main key though so perhaps other products might give similar results.

..Tom
 

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I have ordered a Cameleon oiler. Has had good reviews even against the Tutoro and Scottolier.
Should come any day so will post up pics and give a review soon as I can.
 

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That Wurth lube aint cheap, would be over $30 shipped........it aint that good. ;)
Your price above shocked me so I called Wurth Canada. The price for a single can has gone up.. it it $19.71 per can if purchased by itself and if in a case of 12 it would be around $17 or $18. These are Canadian Prices in Canadian Dollars and should be quite a bit less in the USA. It isn't sold at retail stores but is sold direct by Wurth. Many Auto dealerships use it so it is possible your local dealership may have some.

We go through cases of it at our dealerships.

(I have no affiliation with Wurth and just think they make a great product.)

..Tom
 

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I recently bought a second hand Scott oiler and after 2,000 miles and about 3.5 ounces of ATF my chain is clean and lubricated. I'm happy enough that if another used auto oiler (any brand) pops upat a reasonable pirice i'll grab it and put it on one of the other chain driven bikes.
 

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I barely get 20k out of good chains. They're not overtightened, they're lubricated every gas tank or more.

The problem is I ride dirt. Every chance I get. Dusty gravel, mud, the kind of stuff that sticks to wet lube and creates a grinding paste.

Dirt kills chains, and you must clean them. Can't just re-lube a chain caked in sticky muck. If you don't clean 'em, you'll just be recreating the grinding paste when you re-wet the grime and gunk that's caked in between the plates, that goes to the rollers, chain wears out. Even if you don't clean them, the trapped gunk creates corrosion and that'll take its toll too. Sprockets, too, they go fast when you're riding dirt.

I could stop riding so much dirt, but no chain life is worth that.
 

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I just spoke to a long time rental dealer in Wisconsin visiting family and he said the grit must come off or the rentals oring chains won't go 10k miles. They use Bel-ray since dirt doesn't stick to it. The trails here are all gravel and dirt. He says he has tried everything over decades on dozens of bikes. I am using Dupont Chainsaver so am not promoting the product. My dealer in Missouri uses Bel-ray as well concidentally. I may try it.
 

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I just spoke to a long time rental dealer in Wisconsin visiting family and he said the grit must come off or the rentals oring chains won't go 10k miles. They use Bel-ray since dirt doesn't stick to it. The trails here are all gravel and dirt. He says he has tried everything over decades on dozens of bikes. I am using Dupont Chainsaver so am not promoting the product. My dealer in Missouri uses Bel-ray as well concidentally. I may try it.
I've tried Belray, Teflon-products, wax-based lubes, even went for spells where I just didn't lubricate with anything. Dirt sticks to it all, if you get into enough dirt and the right kind. Dust, especially from clay roads & gravel, is insidious...it just coats your whole driveline.

I found that after riding dirt, I had to clean the chain prior to re-lube pretty much no matter what I did.

The hardcore dirt guys, GNCC racers and the like swear by WD-40 or really light lubes for that sort of thing. Dirt sticks to it, but it flings off, cleans and re-lubes (a little bit) about as well as anything else. I carry some when I ride dirt, and hose the chain down on my way home....tends to make the cleanup at home a lot easier.
 

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It makes sense and I agree with the posts here including Vtom, Swingset and those who advocate for automatic oilers. I currently use Motorex off road lube, and am happy with the product. I lubricate the chain after the second tank fill ( more or less if I have a CRS moment). I clean my chain when the dirt accumulates with a cloth soaked in oil or degreaser.

That said, personally, I have a different approach. When the chain and sprockets tick off about 25,000 miles, I proactively have them replaced regardless. 25,000 miles takes me about two plus years into the parts, and for the $$, I am happy to ride the bike new again. For $200., I have peace of mind, a ride to rely on with no worries. :smile2:
 

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Chain Guard

IF I was regularly using my V2 in the dirt, I would certainly modify the chain guard. Namely, the inside needs to offer coverage for the chain from the dirt that gets piled on it from the rear tire.
The OEM chain guard is sort of a minimalist bikini item. In the past (on enduro bikes) I have used a length of rubber from the kick-space at the bottom of kitchen counters to keep the dirt and mud off in the first place. A few pop rivets and a heat gun. It also helps keep the countershaft sprocket area from packing up. All the info in the previous posts still apply.
 
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