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Discussion Starter #1
I recently purchased the above tool to change the chain on my Vee. So if anyone in the Ohio area is planning on changing their chain out and needs the tool, let me know. It would be an excuse to take a trip and meet/help-out other Strommers. It's a pretty easy procedure that's well within the abilities of most DIY'ers.

BigB, Scarlet Harlot and I were able to figure out so it can't be too difficult (and it hasn't fallen off yet!)

Ride safe
 

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Hello FD

So the chain is working out for you. Do you notice anything different about the way your bike is riding? I was surprized in the difference between the stock chain and your aftermarket chain. Are the old sprockets holding up OK?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The spacers smoothed out the shifting somewhat. There's still a crunch every once in a while going from 1-2 but that may be more operator than bike. The sprockets look good and should last until the next chain change.

I also re-did the TBS and locked it down this time (it was out due to the vibration) and between the spacers, new chain and TBS the big Strom is purring like a kitten.
 

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Hey Steve when you do the TBS are you able get you hands on the throttle body boots? I was looking around on some obscure forum and a guy with a DL1000 was reporting that his throttle body boots were loose and eventually cracked due to excessive play. He felt that the boots were loose from the factory and being loose was what caused his TB's to go out of synch all the time. I guess he did a tbs like every 2 months. He stated that you have to physically check the boot tightness as a visual was not enough to ensure it was actually in place and tight. Just something to think about.
 

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To check the boots you really need the tank and airbox off, but that's not a big job once you know how to do it.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I had the tank off recently to check the air filter and when I was in there I tightened everything I could reach. The boots were in place and snugged down. When I did the first TBS at B's we didn't put anything on the screw to lock it so this time I used some of my wife's nail polish so I can look at it and see if its turned.
 

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I recently checked the TBS on my 04 1000, using a mercury tube setup. The cylinders were about 2" apart, but I gave up trying to get a tool on the adjuster screw. What is the secret for getting to the adjuster?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Big B just sticks his hand in there to turn it:cool:
I removed the right side fairing and was then able to reach in and turn it by hand. I'd strongly suggest wearing some gloves 'cause it can get a little warm!

BigB just loosens (sp?) the right side fairing and is able to get in to the adjusting screw. I found that way a little cramped for me.
 

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I had the nose cone off today for another purpose. Once you have the side fairings off, its only 2 more bolts. With the nose cone removed, the TBS adjuster is easily accessible with a verrrry long screwdriver. I suggest that become part of the recommended procedure, as it sure beats burning your hands.

Unfortunately, when I attempted to start the engine to warm it up, I forgot that the rear wheel was off. Even though the trans was in neutral, the front sprocket turned enough to totally jam the chain around itself. I can't seem to turn to get it to turn backwards. I guess I'm going to be purchasing a 32mm socket to remove the countershaft sprocket. I should have one on hand anyway.

Why is it that when you start a small project, it gets bigger? When you're all done, you realize half of what you disassembled really didn't need to come off...
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I had the nose cone off today for another purpose. Once you have the side fairings off, its only 2 more bolts. With the nose cone removed, the TBS adjuster is easily accessible with a verrrry long screwdriver. I suggest that become part of the recommended procedure, as it sure beats burning your hands.

Unfortunately, when I attempted to start the engine to warm it up, I forgot that the rear wheel was off. Even though the trans was in neutral, the front sprocket turned enough to totally jam the chain around itself. I can't seem to turn to get it to turn backwards. I guess I'm going to be purchasing a 32mm socket to remove the countershaft sprocket. I should have one on hand anyway.

Why is it that when you start a small project, it gets bigger? When you're all done, you realize half of what you disassembled really didn't need to come off...
That's the story of life! My wife will ask me "How long will this take?" (Auto repairs you pervs!) and it will always take longer than expected due to unexpected delays.

Good luck with getting the chain un-jammed and I hope it didn't do any more damage.
 
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