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07' Wee. When I loosen the axel nut, the right chain adjuster screw and cap become loose and slides partway out, allowing the right side of the axel to slide back. The adjuster screw functions properly, moving the axel forward and back. The left side cap stays snug. Any ideas?
 

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07' Wee. When I loosen the axel nut, the right chain adjuster screw and cap become loose and slides partway out, allowing the right side of the axel to slide back. The adjuster screw functions properly, moving the axel forward and back. The left side cap stays snug. Any ideas?
Mine did the same thing Sunday when I changed the rear tire.....I can't remember if it's done it before or not. :confused:
 

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I put a small round object, like a screwdriver shaft in the chain and roll the wheel so the round object is between the chain and sprocket. This will pull the wheel and chain adjuster tight until you tighten the axle nut. Just remember to remove the round object.
 

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Loosen axle nut, kick the back of the tire to move it forward, readjust chain tension.

When you adjust the chain ONLY tighten the screws. If you have to loosen them, loosen them more than necessary, take all the slack out (kick the rear of the tire), and then tighten them to the desired position. When you loosen the adjusters there is no spring or anything to hold tension.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Well. That didn't work/I didn't do it right. I just don't understand why there is play in the first place, while on the left side there is none. Without taking it apart, I don't know how these type of adjusters function. I'm use to the tradional lock nut and bolt. The factory service manual is no help. I'm thinking it has to be removed and adjusted. I've ridden 16,000 miles and haven't had a problem.
 

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They pull the axle to the rear. They're not actually rigidly linked to the axle. In other words, when you loosen one, it just moves its "pulling mechanism" forward, the axle stays as is. It sounds like you have one loose and one tight. I'd loosen both a bunch, pushing/kicking the rear tire forward until you see they both grab. Then, retighten them together to spec tension. Hope this helps.
 

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Yep, I've noticed this....after thousands of miles....

The chain side adjuster has all the load on it pulling the chain tight. That actually unloads the muffler side adjuster. I think the axle "walks" slightly as you apply the big torque on the axle nut. The axle and nut hold everything together, so the loose adjuster isn't a problem by itself. You can get some misalignment, though, which is more of a problem.

I'd suggest double checking the alignment after the axle is tight. If alignment is good I think you're good to go.

My experience is that good alignment makes for even greater handling. Mine came aligned by the marks and that isn't good at all. I rode it thousands of miles that way before trying something else.
 

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Well. That didn't work/I didn't do it right. I just don't understand why there is play in the first place, while on the left side there is none. Without taking it apart, I don't know how these type of adjusters function. I'm use to the tradional lock nut and bolt. The factory service manual is no help. I'm thinking it has to be removed and adjusted. I've ridden 16,000 miles and haven't had a problem.
If one side is tight and the other is loose you've got something out of alignment.

Here Is A Parts Breakdown

The adjuster bolts simply go through threads on the adjuster. When you TIGHTEN the adjuster bolt it pulls the adjuster to the rear toward the cap and puts tension on everything. When you LOOSEN the adjuster bolt it does nothing but loosen the adjuster bolt and allow the cap to get loose, the adjuster itself does not move. You have to loosen both sides more than necessary, physically push everything forward, and then tighten the adjusters to pull everything together.
 

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Yep, I've noticed this....after thousands of miles....

The chain side adjuster has all the load on it pulling the chain tight. That actually unloads the muffler side adjuster. I think the axle "walks" slightly as you apply the big torque on the axle nut. The axle and nut hold everything together, so the loose adjuster isn't a problem by itself. You can get some misalignment, though, which is more of a problem.

I'd suggest double checking the alignment after the axle is tight. If alignment is good I think you're good to go.

My experience is that good alignment makes for even greater handling. Mine came aligned by the marks and that isn't good at all. I rode it thousands of miles that way before trying something else.
What/how did you check your alignment to see that the marks were off?

Mine looks to be aligned by using the marks..and it handles fine..and I don't see any unusual wear on the chain or sprocket or tire.....
 

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What/how did you check your alignment to see that the marks were off?

Mine looks to be aligned by using the marks..and it handles fine..and I don't see any unusual wear on the chain or sprocket or tire.....
My new bike was aligned by the marks and it took a few K miles to realise they were off by almost a full mark. Cornering felt slightly different from one side to the other. Once I got the sprocket teeth running in the middle of the chain, cornering felt the same, and the chain made less noise. Same as what aldntn said.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Well boys, the light bulb just popped on! The adjusters are just that. Adjusters. When snug, they prevent the axel from moving forward. My thinking was flawed that the adjusters functioned to keep the axel from sliding backwards. The tension from the axel nut holds the axel in place. :yikes: I've been doing this on the bike for two years.:green_lol:

Loosen the adjusters. Shove the wheel forward. Tighten the adjuster screws until they start to pull the axel backward. Tighten each adjuster to match the marks on both sides. Check chain tension. Utilize small incrimental turns on the adjusters to achieve desired chain tension and proper alignment.

Thanks for all your help Scraig.
 

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Well boys, the light bulb just popped on! The adjusters are just that. Adjusters. When snug, they prevent the axel from moving forward. My thinking was flawed that the adjusters functioned to keep the axel from sliding backwards. The tension from the axel nut holds the axel in place. :yikes: I've been doing this on the bike for two years.:green_lol:

Loosen the adjusters. Shove the wheel forward. Tighten the adjuster screws until they start to pull the axel backward. Tighten each adjuster to match the marks on both sides. Check chain tension. Utilize small incrimental turns on the adjusters to achieve desired chain tension and proper alignment.

Thanks for all your help Scraig.
You got it. The adjuster bolts do nothing going forward, it has to be done manually by shoving the wheel forward.
 

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My new bike was aligned by the marks and it took a few K miles to realise they were off by almost a full mark. Cornering felt slightly different from one side to the other. Once I got the sprocket teeth running in the middle of the chain, cornering felt the same, and the chain made less noise. Same as what aldntn said.
You didn't answer my question though. :confused:

How did you determine that they were "off"?

And how do you now determine that it's straight when making an adjustment?
 

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You didn't answer my question though. :confused:

How did you determine that they were "off"?

And how do you now determine that it's straight when making an adjustment?
The easiest way is to spin the rear wheel a few revolutions and look at the chain and sprocket relationship. If the teeth of the sprocket are right in the centers of the chain rollers everything is aligned. If they are off to one side things are not properly aligned. The index marks on the swingarm are seldom right.
 

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You didn't answer my question though. :confused:

How did you determine that they were "off"?

And how do you now determine that it's straight when making an adjustment?
If you like you can measure the distance between the axle and the swing-arm pivot centers, either with a tape measure or with this http://forums.ninja250.org/viewtopic.php?p=668685&sid=82912fd84b7da054157f0349c1ba55b6#668685. This proves your axle is aligned with you swing arm. If you are going to use the "chain being centered on the sprocket during rotation procedure" you should tighten the chain up petty good or it may not run straight. By design there is quite a bit of play in a chain, and it gets worse with age. You can also have some wobble in the sprocket.
 

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You didn't answer my question though. :confused:

How did you determine that they were "off"?

And how do you now determine that it's straight when making an adjustment?
The bike not feeling the same in left/right corners was the first indication of something wrong. This got me to "looking". I then noticed the color of the rollers on the chain didn't look uniform. They were slightly discolored more on one side. Examining the rear sprocket, I noticed one side of the teeth were less beveled than the other. This turned out to be from the chain rubbing the sprocket due to running on one side of it.

I started playing around with the adjusters and after a couple K miles, got everything right and all the above was corrected. At this point, the marks were off by almost one. This was all before I had a centerstand and was one of the main motivators in getting one.

But what SCraig says, and what I said earlier sums it up in a nutshell. If the rear sprocket teeth are not running in the middle of the chain, it's not aligned as close as it should be.
I now ignore the marks when aligning untill I'm finished. They're always still off by 3/4 to 7/8 of a full mark.
 

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If you like you can measure the distance between the axle and the swing-arm pivot centers, either with a tape measure or with this http://forums.ninja250.org/viewtopic.php?p=668685&sid=82912fd84b7da054157f0349c1ba55b6#668685. This proves your axle is aligned with you swing arm. If you are going to use the "chain being centered on the sprocket during rotation procedure" you should tighten the chain up petty good or it may not run straight. By design there is quite a bit of play in a chain, and it gets worse with age. You can also have some wobble in the sprocket.
Thanks...I think that I'll rig up something like that from scrap I have laying around.

As I said before....looking at my chain on the sprocket and inspecting it's wear and that of the sprockets and tires....I see nothing amiss. Also mine seems to handle fine.

But since y'all are reporting the discrepancy I will definitely look into the matter a bit closer. :yesnod:
 
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