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Discussion Starter #1
I thought i would take a second and go over my center stand install and following chain adjustment.

Center stand, not much to say. It works great. Im amazed how easy it props up. Worth getting one yes, worth the $250, way overpriced.
The job is so much easier and safer if you have a brake spring tool. They are invaluable, especially if you have a vehicle with drum brakes.

Now, the main reason i wanted to have a center stand is its much easier do a proper chain adjustment and subsequent lube. It also lets you rotate the tire and feel and hear for rubbing, etc.

I initially performed the chain adjustment according the manual. As far as tension, i will continue to do it on the side stand/under load. However, in conjunction with that, you can prop it on the center stand and also check chain alignment. In my case, the adjustment marks on the swingarm are a little off. I could see the chain off to one side of the sprocket, and a slight bend in the chain, very slight. After a few different trials and once i was confident it was inline, i found that the measurement from the end of the swingarm to the adjustment plate was exact on both sides. That will be my reference for now on. Your vehicle may vary.

How much does it make a difference in tire wear, chain wear, etc? Well, i dont know. But my tire rotated a little better once i adjusted the alignment. It doesn't take much adjustment to throw it out. I also have a brand new chain, so the spinning resistance is amplified.

Again, just my experience, but if you take maintenance and adjustment to the nth degree like me, food for thought.
 

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Good post! 110% on both counts.
Yessir, a brake spring tool makes the job literally a snap.
Alignment should always be part of a chain adjustment. And use an aolignment tool to check, dont just trust the swingarm marks. I use an Align-Right tool, basically a huge adjustable compass with provisions for length and depth.
I dont know if they are available any more, I bought mine in '94 from Sims & Rohm, associates of Kawasaki Racing's Muzzy's, who later sold them. Very precise, foolproof. I also, at times, use the Motion-Pro tool that clamps on to the rear sprocket. Inexpensive, easy to use.
I adjustmy bikes with the bike on side stand, put my seight on and off the seat, and set chain slack to 20-30mm.
It's kinda curious how the Suzuki factory service manual says to supposrt the motorcycle with a jack for checking and adjustment, while the owner's manual says to check and adjust while on the sidestand.
Ive found that with some bikes, most recently a Yamaha FJ09 and my '14 Vstrom1000, adjusting while on the centerstand leaves the chain way too tight when the bike is in it's normal weight-laden position.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I found the same thing on factory slack numbers, too tight. Im one to usually follow all mfr specs. If i adjust to that, then place weight on the bike, its very tight. Its hard to tell though how tight that would be when hitting a bump in the road.

I would like to get an alignment tool, but i read a couple reviews about the motion pro its a little inaccurate. What are your thoughts? I suppose its more accurate than not having one.
 

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I measure from the swing arm pivot to rear axle on each side.
 

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I learnt by using a swingarm spool. All the weight is on the swingarm, so the slack adjustment is more accurate plus one can spin the wheel to observe from behind, how true the chain runs on the rear sprocket vs the center of the chain links. You will notice if the chain runs to one side or not. Granted, you can carry the swingarm spool with you, but it helped with identifying the amount of slack required. Once this tension was known, placing the bike on the main or side stand helped understand the difference required for the latter stands. As I said, a good learning and handy tool.
 

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Good idea on using the swingarm spool.I usually use a tape measure to check alignment.It' s
worked for 50 years now,so why change.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Update here. I grabbed a motion pro tool, threw it on and confirmed my previous method of alignment was correct (watching the tracking of the chain). As an engineer ive always had a pretty good eye for these types of things. This would seem to confirm not to follow the marks on the swingarm, at least not until they are confirmed correct, or close. I could actually tell the rear wheel was slightly out of whack. Again, who knows if it would ever be a safety issue. I think it would certainly affect chain and sprocket life.
 

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I learnt by using a swingarm spool. All the weight is on the swingarm, so the slack adjustment is more accurate plus one can spin the wheel to observe from behind, how true the chain runs on the rear sprocket vs the center of the chain links. You will notice if the chain runs to one side or not. Granted, you can carry the swingarm spool with you, but it helped with identifying the amount of slack required. Once this tension was known, placing the bike on the main or side stand helped understand the difference required for the latter stands. As I said, a good learning and handy tool.
That's a great idea/tip, Gert. Thanks.
 
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