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Hello vstromers,

I have been hoping to locate a tire repair kit for repairing a tire while on the road but haven't really found any that were very impressive. Can you recommend any from personal experience?

Obviously I'm looking for effectiveness and ease of use. :yesnod:



Thanks,
 

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Not impressive but just have Walmart I do get a fresh one every year

Carry Walmart Slime compressor cost me $10
 

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emergency plug

I carry the Slime plugs as pictured above just in case of an emergency.
No product will be easy to use along a roadside. Removing the wheel and then the tire etc is no simple task, yet some riders can do it. I've not had a MC tire failure but for the few car tire repairs I've always been able to get professional service at a shop and had a plug or patch vulcanized. Ya, right I do have a spare with my car. In the case of a MC tire failure I'd use my motor league card and get a roadside pickup and get to a profession to do the repair. Having my Slime emergency plug repair kit is probably nothing more than some false sense of security; but I still carry it.
 

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The Nealey kit worked very well for me for a year. This plus a Slime 40001 Power Sport 12v. compressor and a pair of diagonal wire cutters to grip & pull out the nail, and you're set up as good as possible.
Nealey Tire Repair Kit
 

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I agree the rubber plugs are not reliable,they have failed in a short time without glue which always has dried out when I want it.I rely on the sticky strings and an insertion tool and a mountain bike tire pump.
 

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I "built" this kit about 15 years ago. Co2 inflater came from a bicycle shop , get my refills from Wal-mart , and the plugs (I prefer the H/D brown ones) and glue from the auto parts store. The tool you install the plug with needs to be split on the end for sure. It fits neatly in the little leather pouch , and stays under the seat of the bike. I've fixed 8 tires so far. My wife has a kit just like it on her bike a well.

 

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I carry the Slime plugs as pictured above just in case of an emergency.
No product will be easy to use along a roadside. Removing the wheel and then the tire etc is no simple task, yet some riders can do it.
why would you have to remove the wheel?

:confused:

It takes me about ten minutes to fix a flat and be on my way, using sticky strings and a small compressor.


start at 3:35
 

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The Stop-n-Stay rubber mushroom plugs do NOT work. DAMHIK. :furious:


Any sticky string kit will work great. And they're easily available for a couple of bucks just about anywhere. However, the tube of rubber cement inevitably dries out after a month or two of rattling around on a bike. (Again, this is bitter experience speaking here... :furious: )

That's why I carry the Nealey Mini Repair kit. It's a somewhat better kind of sticky string that doesn't require glue. In addition, it's installed in a slightly different way that actually ties a knot inside the tire. Simple, they work great, and they come in a nice little plastic tube with an installation tool.


Next, let's discuss air.

I long ago gave up carrying the CO2 cartridges because it takes at least four of them to make a tire rideable, let alone bringing it to proper pressure. And if you have more than one puncture, or if the bead has come off the rim, or if your stupid goddamn fraudulent Stop-n-Go plugs keep popping out, you're simply SOL by the side of the road. (Yep, another set of hard-earned real-life personal experiences... :headbang: )

The best solution I've found is a small electric pump, such as the "Slime" brand inflator My Slime pump has pumped up MANY flats, and is still going strong -- I do test it several times a year to make sure it's pumping well. There are several similar compact electric air compressors available.

The truly paranoid rider headed for uncivilized parts might also carry a backup source of air -- CO2 cartridges or a small bicycle pump.
 

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The style I use works perfect. I've seen some Co2 jobs at Wal-mart that look different than mine (I think marketed by Bell) in the bicycle section , buddy bought one , and it was worthless. I find it takes about 4 to get a tire to the right pressure , less if you're just pulling a nail or so forth. I've repaired/plugged a bunch of tires over the years with no issue. This works for me , others might like compressors , but I'd rather just pull out this kit , fix , and go.
 

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In the case of a MC tire failure I'd use my motor league card and get a roadside pickup and get to a profession to do the repair.
FWIW, I have yet to find a professional that will repair a motorcycle tire. They don't want the liability.
 

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FWIW, I have yet to find a professional that will repair a motorcycle tire. They don't want the liability.
I've had to push my dealer into a repair

several years ago, I dropped my SV650 off for routine service, an hour later at my office, I get a call I need a new tire, my rear lost all it's air and had a "big" screw in it

I asked them to plug it, they said "NO"

I told them then, just do the service, I will pick up the bike with a flat tire, knowing I had a plug kit and compressor under the seat, I woulda plugged it right in their parking lot

later that day when I went to pick up the bike, the tire was fixed already



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