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Discussion Starter #1
I was on a ride when I started to feel some slippage. I stopped and inspected my chain which had substantially loosened up to the point it was dragging on my center stand! (Very dangerous amount of play actually) I had the tools to tighten it up, but from that point, a weird sound started happening. Almost sounded like sloppiness in the transmission. When I got home, I removed the front sprocket cover and noticed a lot of O-rings in the chain lube gunk that built up on the cover. It's an 07 DL650 with 24k miles. This possibly could be the original chain??
I just ordered a new chain and set of sprockets in hopes this will resolve that new noise. Has anyone else experienced this?
 

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Yes very easily the stock chain and sprockets at 24,000 miles. With the right care they would have gone many more miles.

New chain and sprockets will go a long way in making things better.

Also inspect the wheel/cush bearings and cush drive rubbers when the wheel is off the bike.

When you put everything back together make sure you align and tension the chain properly.
 

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Once you get that new chain and sprockets on and adjusted right, you will think you got a new bike. Keep that chain oiled with gear lube and you should get at least 20k miles out of it.

While you have the wheel off, check the Cush drive


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Yes make sure to accurately align the chain. I never believed the old saw about the alignment marks may not be accurate but I do now. My chain is not aligned if using those marks, I bought the Motion Pro alignment tool and no more problems.

The rubber cush drive needed replacing after a few years and 40,000 miles also. Was loose to the point of sprocket falling off wheel when removed. It can be shimmed but new OEM wasn't too expensive.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Once you get that new chain and sprockets on and adjusted right, you will think you got a new bike. Keep that chain oiled with gear lube and you should get at least 20k miles out of it.

While you have the wheel off, check the Cush drive


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Reporting back. You weren't kidding. Put the new sprockets and chain on and it really does feel like a new bike!!! All strange noises are gone.
 

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Not to Hi-Jack but what is the criteria for "checking" the cush drive rubber?
 

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Cush drive: When you turn the rear wheel over and the sprocket carrier falls out it definitely is bad. It should sit tight!

My test is trying to lift the rear wheel (laying flat on the ground) up on the sprocket. If the carrier falls out attempting the lift, need new rubbers or shimming or more shimming.
 

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Before throwing money at a new set of cush rubbers, why not just shim the cush rubber by using inner tube as spacer in each slot that the cush rubber is located. If this happens to solve your problem,then by all means order new cush rubbers, if you want. The cush rubber mod will work for many miles.
 

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Before throwing money at a new set of cush rubbers, why not just shim the cush rubber by using inner tube as spacer in each slot that the cush rubber is located. If this happens to solve your problem,then by all means order new cush rubbers, if you want. The cush rubber mod will work for many miles.
Don't agree. The cush rubbers are rubber because they need to dampen the power pulses from the engine. There is no damping anywhere else in the engine/drivetrain. Once the rubber start to deteriorate, it loses this damping ability. If you shim them, the sprocket won't fall out and there's no free play, but that doesn't magically restore the damping ability of the cush rubbers themselves.

Only replacing them with fresh rubber will restore the damping ability, and will make for a significantly smoother ride.
 

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Don't agree. The cush rubbers are rubber because they need to dampen the power pulses from the engine. There is no damping anywhere else in the engine/drivetrain. Once the rubber start to deteriorate, it loses this damping ability. If you shim them, the sprocket won't fall out and there's no free play, but that doesn't magically restore the damping ability of the cush rubbers themselves.

Only replacing them with fresh rubber will restore the damping ability, and will make for a significantly smoother ride.
Counterpoint: The stock cush drive rubbers just suck, and if you do a lot of stop-and-go or ride on rough pavement it'll be loose in no time. Excessive driveline lash will cause more havoc than engine vibrations, so any play just has to be shimmed out even when the rubber is still good.
 

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Well stated Fox! Shimming is basically packing the existing rubber with more rubber padding. While not considered as permanent solution, it would help to prove a point / eliminate any cush rubber lash as a possible cause of the chain noise complaint. All I can say, is try it first and then see if it helps at all. Then if you need to replace the cush rubbers, then by all means replace them.
 
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