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Hey guys and gals,
I am hoping to do my first adventure on my 2005 Wee. I am going to leave my home in Lake Tahoe (Northern California) and am now considering venturing up through Canada to Tuk. I am weighing this against the popular Alaska route to Prudhoe Bay (which I posted a discussion about previously) . I am a professional landscape and wildlife photographer, and have been told the journey through Canada to Tuk may be more photogenic and dramatic. One route suggested would take me through Prince George-Kitwanga-Hwy 37 to Alaska Hwy to Whitehorse- on to Klondike Hwy-Dempster Hwy to Tuk.
I value any input or suggestions. I am a relatively new rider, so want to stay on "safer" roads. Also would like to know if you feel that this trip is reasonable in June vs July. Is rain as much an issue as further west in Alaska? Will the northern part of the journey run into snow issues? Snow on the mountain tops will ad to my photos...
Finally, I am hoping to tie in to highlights of the journey such as: native peoples / culture, natural wonders, regional history, environmental issues, etc. Perhaps hoping to have a partial theme for this adventure.
I appreciate any insights, suggestions, resources for learning, etc. If I can make this trip happen, it will be quite the life experience.
Happy travels,
JP
 

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I plan on riding to D2D in June (June 18/19)….Dawson City, Yukon. I was planning on taking the SE route from Whitehorse to Dawson, instead of thru Tok/Chicken.....will save that route when I am headed to Fairbanks after D2D. I have read two separate RR's where items were stolen off overnight parked bikes in Prince George. I believe there exist a drug problem in the city = folks stealing to support their habits. Just a Warning.
 

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Sorry Tahoe...…….I should have said I am taking the eastern route (Grand Cache, Grand Prairie) to Dawson.....by-passing Prince George. Not Whitehorse as I said previously. I did not have the map in front of me...….trying to go by memory.....and Canada is BIG...….!!!!!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Sorry Tahoe...…….I should have said I am taking the eastern route (Grand Cache, Grand Prairie) to Dawson.....by-passing Prince George. Not Whitehorse as I said previously. I did not have the map in front of me...….trying to go by memory.....and Canada is BIG...….!!!!!!!!
Thank you Mark444. I need to get myself a map to ponder. I've just started this task, so I've primarily been online.
JP
 

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Option 1
Hiway 97 once in canada..1hr 45 min north to westside rd..one of the sweetest rides,
you will come out at the north end of okanagan lake..
From vernon ,head to the east and a town named nakusp..go for a hotspring relax..camping available..
A bit of a side trip but worth it..
After your hot soak..lol..head north to revelstoke bc..
East to the rockeys or west back to the interior and on to kamloops bc..great hiways with incredible views
Kamloops is going to be the "gateway "to the north of bc as cities turn to towns and get farther apart..

Option 2
Enter canada in the vancouver area and take the sea to sky hiway 99..thru to cash creek and head north from there..carefull the scenery will blow your mind.

Option 3
Fraser canyon ..
Main hiway north from hope bc to cash creek..again ..incredible scenery..

Im sure someone will chime in about sections farther north than what i have posted above...
Shoot me a pm when u cross the border..if u want a tour


ride often,ride true,ride smart
 

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I'm sure you've looked at the Wiki page for Tuk, in particular the climate part. June is still pretty cool on average (average high 11 C, average low 1.7 C, but a little drier than July, which is still pretty dry - average ~22 mm rain in July, about a third of what we average here). So strictly from a weather point of view, I'd prefer July to June.

Man, that's a long run. 3,700 km from Vancouver, BC. At least half of it on unpaved roads. Only a little shorter than the distance from where I live (Hamilton, ON), to Vancouver. Sound like fun!
 

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"The Milepost" is a huge source for travels in western Canada and Alaska. It's nice to buy a paper copy so you have the big map with all the routes for planning, really helps tie it together in a way that online mapping never really does. With purchase you get a digital code to download it all and take it on the road. TONS of details about fuel, food, lodging, tourist stuff, camping, local color, etc. No, I don't work for them. Strongly recommended.
 

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Option 2
Enter canada in the vancouver area and take the sea to sky hiway 99..thru to cash creek and head north from there..carefull the scenery will blow your mind.
Perhaps the best riding EVAH. Just a joy but mind the critters and your fuel.

Agree on the Milepost.

My son and I did mid-June for 20 days coming from the east.
Make sure you include Valdez and Lulubelle in your plans.

Ride down to Valdez is superb through Keyhole Canyon and by the Wrangell St Alias Range,


Also worth while is a flight on the Talkeetna Air Taxi - might be the hilight of the trip


The headache with July is it can rain and rain and rain. Alaska temps have been very warm ...mid june in BC in the valleys were 80+ -a lot depends on the ENSO situation how far north the storms are pushed.
I prefer June for the long daylight.
You can come back via Jasper - Banff and Glacier
 

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I have done 3 trips north of the Arctic Circle and all started in mid to late June and if I went again it would still be mid-June.
You will have almost 1,100 miles of gravel travel on the Dempster Highway and new Highway 10 to Tuk. Road construction will add more. There can be many miles of construction.
I rode to Deadhorse in 2012, Inuvik in 2015 and in 2019 I rode my 2018 DL650 to Tuktoyaktuk.
Details of the ride to Tuk - Back to the Arctic - Tuktoyaktuk

.
 

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I plan on riding to D2D in June (June 18/19)….Dawson City, Yukon. I was planning on taking the SE route from Whitehorse to Dawson, instead of thru Tok/Chicken.....will save that route when I am headed to Fairbanks after D2D. I have read two separate RR's where items were stolen off overnight parked bikes in Prince George. I believe there exist a drug problem in the city = folks stealing to support their habits. Just a Warning.
PG is not a destination in and of itself. I used to live there a long time ago, and I'm sure things have changed since, but it's not a terrible place other than the pulp mill bouquet. It's the biggest town you'll see for a LOT of miles and if you need services, it's a good place to stop. But, yeah, I wouldn't leave stuff on my bike overnight. Anywhere.
 

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As a new rider he'd be best to avoid the Dempster and maybe even Top of the World and concentrate on Kenai Pennisula, Denali and Valdez ....IMNSHO :D
Tok is the crossroads and approachable from two directions all paved except for construction which indeed can be brutal....K60s and some muddy roads/gravel practice would be advised.
 

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Option 1
Hiway 97 once in canada..1hr 45 min north to westside rd..one of the sweetest rides,
you will come out at the north end of okanagan lake..
From vernon ,head to the east and a town named nakusp..go for a hotspring relax..camping available..
A bit of a side trip but worth it..
After your hot soak..lol..head north to revelstoke bc..
East to the rockeys or west back to the interior and on to kamloops bc..great hiways with incredible views
Kamloops is going to be the "gateway "to the north of bc as cities turn to towns and get farther apart..

Option 2
Enter canada in the vancouver area and take the sea to sky hiway 99..thru to cash creek and head north from there..carefull the scenery will blow your mind.

Option 3
Fraser canyon ..
Main hiway north from hope bc to cash creek..again ..incredible scenery..

Im sure someone will chime in about sections farther north than what i have posted above...
Shoot me a pm when u cross the border..if u want a tour


ride often,ride true,ride smart
I've done both Fraiser and Sea to Sky and IMHO sea to sky much better.

@OP: look up Casair and Cambell as alternatives to Alcan, they are much better. Also take AL-42 from grande prairie to icefields and then south to Glacier national Park on the way home good luck
 

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Finally, I am hoping to tie in to highlights of the journey such as: native peoples / culture, natural wonders, regional history, environmental issues, etc. Perhaps hoping to have a partial theme for this adventure.
I appreciate any insights, suggestions, resources for learning, etc. If I can make this trip happen, it will be quite the life experience.
BC has beautiful riding. However, you would be doing yourself a disservice by staying solely in our province. Head slightly east - take the extra day, and make it 2 or 3 - and see the Rockies. The Icefields Parkway is jaw-droppingly beautiful, and you can see Lake Louise, Banff, and Jasper townsites all in a day if you want. Lots of camping on the route as well. Curl back around at Mount Robson and make your way north from their. It's really worth it.

As to your timing question, I was at the Motorcycle Show in Vancouver this week, and a moto touring company running to Tuk was talking about their own Dawson to Tuk trip. They only run it in June and July due to the weather. Snow can come early up their, and yes, you will likely experience rain. And the road will turn to snot mud, according to a friend and several accounts I've read.

However - enjoy, it is a marvellous trip you are embarking on.
 

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I have been riding for over 50 years on all kinds of motorcycles. I can say I would never attempt a ride like that solo too many things can happen that could leave you stranded especially considering your riding a 15 year old machine.

Also the ride seems a bit much for a self proclaimed in experienced rider, you may what to consider taking less demanding ride. I know the whole ride a bike to Alaska sounds very romantic, but it really is a LOT of work with a lots of peril thrown in.
 

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I've been riding that long as well and given where he lives it's not a risky idea at all and very scenic.
The Wee is just about bullet proof. A set of K60s and 3 weeks and you've got a memorable ride. My son and I did similar in 2015 tho not as far up ( we went to Hyder and the across to Vancouver Island ) and I did similar solo in 2019 but from Toronto for 17 days on my own and I'm 72. ( flew the bike to Calgary then rode home )
I'd certainly not consider Prudoe tho.
268985


It is long and tiring days but magnificent scenery and very photogenic.

You would average about 400-450 miles a day staying off the slab - so 6-8 hour days which in June is easy with long daylight hours.

You would want to make a few shorter trips to see how you tolerate long hours and consider a better seat and perhaps windcreen.

You have the option of The Alaska Marine Hwy on the way back.

268986


and BC Ferries

BC Ferries serves up to 47 ports on 25 routes throughout coastal British Columbia.
Our most popular crossings sail between Vancouver Island and Metro Vancouver. They can last from about 95 minutes to two hours, depending on which route you take. There are three to choose from with frequent sailings every day of the year.
Shorter hops include service to the Southern Gulf Islands from both Vancouver and Vancouver Island, and to communities along the Sunshine Coast, northwest of Vancouver. There's also a shortcut between Brentwood and Mill Bay linking the Saanich Peninsula (near Victoria) with the Cowichan Valley.
Further up the coast, BC Ferries provides year-round service between Vancouver Island and a number of Northern Gulf Island communities.
For more of a "cruise line" experience, consider a voyage through British Columbia's majestic Inside Passage. This one is particularly popular with international travellers, going from Port Hardy at the northern end of Vancouver Island to Prince Rupert, gateway to southeast Alaska.
The crossing from Prince Rupert to Haida Gwaii is another fascinating travel opportunity. Sometimes referred to as the "Canadian Galapagos", Haida Gwaii provides habitat for many different species of wildlife. These islands are the ancestral home of the Haida Nation and feature many unique cultural attractions.
BC Ferries' service between Port Hardy and Bella Coola opens up British Columbia's spectacular mid-coast. It's the Discovery Coast Connector, so named because it opens up a part of the province that has been difficult to reach in years past. Stops include McLoughlin Bay-Bella Bella, Shearwater on Denny Island, Klemtu and Ocean Falls.


Spirit of British Columbia
 

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This looks like a great ride. There are some good tips from @ommoran , @Macdoc , and @hoggdoc . There are a few options in southern BC, fewer farther norther. I hope you can avoid the I-5 as you come up through Oregon and Washington. Not unattractive, but there are some much nicer routes if you have the time. The sea to sky, Hwy 99 from Vancouver > Whistler > Duffey Lake Rd, is very nice. Can't go wrong with the Alberta part of this route as well; likely better than the middle of BC.

I have worked in Yukon for about 20 years on various projects, and it is a beautiful land. The highway up to Dawson City is excellent for the most part, about 7 hours from Whitehorse. The ride from Whitehorse to Skagway is spectacular, but a back-the-way-you-came route side trip (with another border crossing at Frasier).

The points about coming back on a ferry from Skagway or Prince Rupert on the BC coast are good suggestions. The timing seems good. Summer comes hard and fast there, and fall arrives early. You get that, 'autumn is in the air' kind of scent starting in August. By Sept, the deciduous trees are mostly bare.

If you are in Vancouver and need a hand or want a visit, PM me. I'd be happy to meet or give other assistance if I'm able.

I envy your trip!
 

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That was a very rough draft just to get a feel for distance. The are lots of wonderful secondary highways to avoid the slab and still keep your goals.
 

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I’d suggest checking Ferry prices and availability early if you think you would like to do that. I rode to Deadhorse from the lower 48 last June by way of the Alaska Hwy. I wanted to visit Vancouver on the return trip and it seemed like a lot of backtracking, almost to Watson Lake to get on 37 heading south to 16 over to Prince George, etc. I had the ferry thought in Fairbanks heading south. When I called the ferry people (around June 18) I was told the next available motorcycle reservation out of Whittier was around July 8 (can’t recall exactly) but there were sooner openings out of Haines, AK. I was quoted $525 for me and another $1,200 for my 650 V-Strom. I thought that was rather steep so I backtracked and rode to Vancouver and it was a fabulous ride. I had never been up there before and found Hwy 37 from the AK Hwy down to Kitwanga to be the most isolated part of my entire trip. You might go a stretch on the Alaska Hwy or the Dalton Hwy without seeing another vehicle, but you can be certain someone is coming along in the next hour or two if not less. I had the feeling on 37 pulling out of Dease Lake that I might not see anyone ever again. I went solo and brought along a rented satellite phone for contingencies and was lucky never to need it.
 
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