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I’m looking at an 09 WeeStrom 650 with just over 90,000 miles on it. It’s owned by the original owner and the ad states it is meticulously maintained and records are included. Not many farkles but it’s the price that’s motivating me. $2,000. What do you all think? It’ll be my first motorcycle ever which is why I’m not trying to spend a lot.
 

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Way too much. I would have to look close and think twice before I paid even 500 bucks for it. Don't take a chance with your first bike purchase.
 

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Meticulously maintenance with records can off set the mileage. I'm sometimes more concerned with low miles on a bike that has sat unused. In your situation a 90K mile bike makes sense, as a first bike you may not put a lot of miles on it, and if you do you can move to something newer with maybe no loss on the Strom. If you were a high mileage rider you'd be better to look for a lower mileage bike, they're plentiful.

Some high mileage maintenance you may look into if you keep the bike is steering head bearings, swingarm bushings, rear shock. I have 67K miles on my '09 650 and haven't done these things yet, I feel the bike will easily do 125K miles with just basic maintenance.

Not sure where you're located, but in the dead of winter it's a buyers market, don't be afraid of offering less, that bike isn't going anywhere for about 2 months. I've seen 650's with half the mileage and a lot of accessories going for $3K or less.
 

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Take it for a ride and check for major leaks and junk, funny colors coming out the exhaust pipe.

If it's all good, that's not a bad deal.

If I sold my SV I'd expect around $2000 or more for it. It's worn, but doesn't need big money thrown at it to keep it running.
 

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What are bikes with half or a third of those miles going for in your area? Would it cost much more to get one with a lot lower miles?
 

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At this price point, a big consideration is how new are the tires, chain, and sprockets. If it has brand new high quality everything, and the bike itself is still in great shape and clean, it might be an okay deal. Without any farkles, I'd be talking him down on price. Especially if it doesn't have a centerstand, engine bars or any luggage.

With 90k miles, it probably uses oil. It's not the end of the world, but it's a nuisance on a very long trip.

I believe '09s had a failure-prone stator but weren't included in the recall. It's a pain in the wallet and ass if it goes.

With its age and miles, things will probably start to get flaky. If you're handy and can keep up with it, it could be fine. But if you need something that will be reliable for many years and miles to come, I would look for something with fewer miles. If you'd be taking it to the shop, it'll nickel and dime you.

For what it's worth, I have a 2006 650 with 101k on it. I rely on it every day, and it gets ridden in Philadelphia's winter warzone of salt, potholes and terrible drivers. There have been no showstoppers that I couldn't get through, but I have had to keep up with it. It's more or less done depreciating, so every mile now is a blessing.
 

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Golly guys, My 04 Wee has 95300 miles on it and I don't intend to replace it any time soon and would gladly jump on it and ride a 1000 mile day.
KBB shows $2500 as a trade in value and 3700 as a dealer sales value.
$2000 seems like a fair price if the records show proper care.
 

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Golly guys, My 04 Wee has 95300 miles on it and I don't intend to replace it any time soon and would gladly jump on it and ride a 1000 mile day.
KBB shows $2500 as a trade in value and 3700 as a dealer sales value.
$2000 seems like a fair price if the records show proper care.

:surprise:
I'm in awe of you iron-butters. I wouldn't want to jump in a car and do 1000 miles in a day. I did a few times when I was younger and it wasn't a pleasant experience, even then.
 

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Unless you have a garage and like to wrench, its not a good idea to buy a high miler. The seller will never get $2000 for that bike and even in the Spring he'd be lucky to get $1500. The meticulous regular maintenance and records is nice but I doubt it includes such things as swingarm, cushion, steering-head bearings, rear shock, etc. These items aren't regular maintenance but are coming due.

Also, unless you are too big to fit on a 250/300 I'd recommend against a V-Strom as a starter bike. Its tall and heavy and you are going to drop it. I suppose that could be your plan -- get this bike for <$1500 if it has good wear items (tire, wheels, brakes, chain, etc.) and learn to ride on it, resist the urge to add any farkles or sink any money into it, sell it a year later for ??? depending on learner's damage.
 

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dmf x2 does have a point. You'll gain confidence and mastery a lot quicker on a smaller 250 or 300, or even a smaller/lower 500-something, like an older Ninja. Not that you have to...I've heard of some folks whose first bike is a liter sport bike. Of course, we don't know how many of those went on to meet an early demise.
 
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I’m looking at an 09 WeeStrom 650 with just over 90,000 miles on it. It’s owned by the original owner and the ad states it is meticulously maintained and records are included. Not many farkles but it’s the price that’s motivating me. $2,000. What do you all think? It’ll be my first motorcycle ever which is why I’m not trying to spend a lot.
With that many miles I wouldn't touch it without a full inspection and compression test. Even with good compression 2k is 2hi. Tires, chain, chudder, etc. = $$$$$. As a first bike I would usually say a 650 was a bit much. That said the DL650 is an easy, comfortable, usually reliable bike to ride. Look around and take your time. Good luck.
 

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I’m looking at an 09 WeeStrom 650 with just over 90,000 miles on it. It’s owned by the original owner and the ad states it is meticulously maintained and records are included. Not many farkles but it’s the price that’s motivating me. $2,000. What do you all think? It’ll be my first motorcycle ever which is why I’m not trying to spend a lot.
Certainly worth checking out. 90,000 isn't that high of miles. Now 430,000+ miles is getting close (Wera688's V-Strom).

Let us know how it goes.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Unless you have a garage and like to wrench, its not a good idea to buy a high miler. The seller will never get $2000 for that bike and even in the Spring he'd be lucky to get $1500. The meticulous regular maintenance and records is nice but I doubt it includes such things as swingarm, cushion, steering-head bearings, rear shock, etc. These items aren't regular maintenance but are coming due.

Also, unless you are too big to fit on a 250/300 I'd recommend against a V-Strom as a starter bike. Its tall and heavy and you are going to drop it. I suppose that could be your plan -- get this bike for <$1500 if it has good wear items (tire, wheels, brakes, chain, etc.) and learn to ride on it, resist the urge to add any farkles or sink any money into it, sell it a year later for ??? depending on learner's damage.
I’m 6’1 290lbs and although a 250 would probably be fine even on the freeway, I’ve been told by everyone that I’d outgrow it too quickly. Also, for the same price of a Ninja 250, I can get a Ninja 650.

Exactly my plan was to get it as a first bike so I don’t have much invested when I inevitably drop it.

My alternative is a 06-08 Ninja 650R for about the same price but hose can be had with 10-20k miles (total, not 10-20k less). However, I don’t know how forgiving those are to learn on but I’m sure they’re quite reliable and I won’t outgrow it terribly soon like I would a 250/300.

I like the look of the strom and the seating position more than the ninja and the fact that if I do decide to take a long trip it’ll be more comfortable on the strom. How bad is the ninja 650 for someone my size and for a trip of say LA to Vegas compared to the strom?
 

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You'd probably like the Strom better than the Ninja all the way around. I've had both, but the Strom is physically larger. It's heavier, taller and more top heavy, but you're not exactly a pretzel like me.:smile2: As a new rider, a lot depends on your inseam. 6'-1" might not be an advantage if you have a 28" leg.

Someone here on the site has a 2011 with 28,xxx miles for $3,000. Northern CA. And from the description, maintenance has been done ahead of time. Seller is a member. Meefzah
 

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I’m 6’1 290lbs and although a 250 would probably be fine even on the freeway, I’ve been told by everyone that I’d outgrow it too quickly.
Yes, I was thinking too tall/lanky (like 6'4"+) for a 250/300 making it a clown bike for these folks but at 6'1" you'd fit. Everyone outgrows their starter bike, but that is a good thing and sort of the point. The nice thing about the 250 market is that it is a "rental" market and easy to buy and flip a bike in a year or two without too much hassle or financial loss. Every Spring there is a new influx of wannabe's creating demand for the bike you are selling. Flipping a V-Strom may not be so easy, especially a high-mileage bike.

Exactly my plan was to get it as a first bike so I don’t have much invested when I inevitably drop it.
I don't think its a horrible plan and it sounds like you have considered the alternatives. But, presumably, the same argument applies to the 250-class bikes so that's a wash. Also, if you buy the high miler Strom you won't "outgrow" it (whatever that means) but you will still be dumping it in a year or two max anyway so even that's a wash. To be consistent you should be looking for a nice, loaded, low- to mid-miles V-Strom that you are committed to for the long haul, knowing you'll be fixing drop damage as a new rider. In the end, this is all just an abstract thought experiment in your mind until you actually get on a bike and learn to ride. You may think you want a DL650 now but after riding a bit your interests may take you in a different direction.
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I say go for it, replace whatever might need replaced and then ride the hell out of it.
 

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I’m 6’1 290lbs and although a 250 would probably be fine even on the freeway, I’ve been told by everyone that I’d outgrow it too quickly. Also, for the same price of a Ninja 250, I can get a Ninja 650.

Exactly my plan was to get it as a first bike so I don’t have much invested when I inevitably drop it.

My alternative is a 06-08 Ninja 650R for about the same price but hose can be had with 10-20k miles (total, not 10-20k less). However, I don’t know how forgiving those are to learn on but I’m sure they’re quite reliable and I won’t outgrow it terribly soon like I would a 250/300.

I like the look of the strom and the seating position more than the ninja and the fact that if I do decide to take a long trip it’ll be more comfortable on the strom. How bad is the ninja 650 for someone my size and for a trip of say LA to Vegas compared to the strom?
Check out Motorcycle Ergonomics . You'll find that the Ninja has a slight forward lean. Not too crazy, but it will make it marginally less comfortable around town. Check out the Kawasaki Versys as well - same base engine as the 650r, but in a package intended for multi-purpose and touring. It's comparable to the strom in most respects including engine power and power delivery, and you can pick them up about as cheaply.

The Honda CB500x is a newer contender. It's also affordable used, not too much for a new rider and well-regarded by motorcycle press even for experienced riders and light distance touring.

I'm going to disagree with dmfdmf and voice my opinion that a 250 will probably not cut it. Most bikes in the class will have difficulty carrying you, and the ride quality will suffer as the suspension constantly bottoms out. The power will be marginal everywhere, especially on the highway. The Ninja 300 might be an exception in the class, but I don't see a reason to pick it over other bikes if you plan to do extended freeway rides.

I am 150 pounds, my usual passenger is 140, and the vstrom two-up is a good balance of power and handling.

edit: Also, put $1,000 in front of your seller and see if he takes it. His bike doesn't owe him anything. Then ride it until it breaks or you don't like it anymore.
 

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Just my 2 cents....

There is nothing wrong with a 650 as a starter bike. I started my riding on a KLR. Yes it is a tall and top heavy bike but in my opinion is a great bike to start off on. Can get them relatively cheap. Can most likely sell them for close to what you paid for it when you are done learning. And most important to me, you can learn your wrenching skills on a bike that is somewhat less forgiving and easier to work on that the Strom.

As for a 250 as a starter. Yes, they do make good starter bike, but you will get bored very quickly and although the power will feel good since it is your first bike, that feeling only lasts a short while and you will be craving for more once your skills improve. The 650 will satisfy that need later once when you get bored with the 250. Having a 250 as a second bike is not a bad idea as there are days when you want something lighter to play with. Also, while you can cruise with them, not ideal.
 

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Just my 2 cents....

There is nothing wrong with a 650 as a starter bike. I started my riding on a KLR. Yes it is a tall and top heavy bike but in my opinion is a great bike to start off on. Can get them relatively cheap. Can most likely sell them for close to what you paid for it when you are done learning. And most important to me, you can learn your wrenching skills on a bike that is somewhat less forgiving and easier to work on that the Strom.

As for a 250 as a starter. Yes, they do make good starter bike, but you will get bored very quickly and although the power will feel good since it is your first bike, that feeling only lasts a short while and you will be craving for more once your skills improve. The 650 will satisfy that need later once when you get bored with the 250. Having a 250 as a second bike is not a bad idea as there are days when you want something lighter to play with. Also, while you can cruise with them, not ideal.
Counter arguments to this -

A 650 single and 650 V-twin are two different beasts, the latter having more potential to be ... unwieldy. Also true, the KLR is a heck of a lot easier to work on, for sure. Tires, valves, plastic, everything.

As for 250's - they're perfectly fine for everything except high speed interstate riding. My WR250R can hold 85 mph and remain stable for a while. It shines on state highways. I'd say it handles better than my DL1000. I'm still able to break all of the speed limits everywhere, but wide open throttle all the time is pretty fun.

If you're getting bored of a 250, you're not flogging it hard enough!
 

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Counter arguments to this -

A 650 single and 650 V-twin are two different beasts, the latter having more potential to be ... unwieldy. Also true, the KLR is a heck of a lot easier to work on, for sure. Tires, valves, plastic, everything.

As for 250's - they're perfectly fine for everything except high speed interstate riding. My WR250R can hold 85 mph and remain stable for a while. It shines on state highways. I'd say it handles better than my DL1000. I'm still able to break all of the speed limits everywhere, but wide open throttle all the time is pretty fun.

If you're getting bored of a 250, you're not flogging it hard enough!
Backroads and off road yes, I owned a WR250R and there is zero get up and go once you hit speed. Now getting up to speed it will rip, rev that engine like a damn 2 stroke!!!! :grin2:
 
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