StromTrooper banner

1 - 20 of 39 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Unless you follow the break-in procedure in the owner's handbook, which according to my research may be the worst way to break in a new bike; how do/did you break in your new DL1000? Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
394 Posts
I can't see why Suzuki would recommend a break-in procedure that wasn't any good for the engine.

I'm sticking to it..... apart from the those times when I can't resist giving that motor an extra squirt just to feel that all that torque - something my old Wee just didn't have.

I'm lucky to live right on the edge of the city so there are plenty of good roads around and very little traffic or slow running to contend with.

Have logged 400kms now, and the motor just keeps getting smoother and more flexible. The brakes have also bedded in nicely and have heaps of power. 21km/l on the first tankful too!

I'm very happy with this bike.:hurray:
 

·
FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
Joined
·
38,103 Posts
My theory is the break in period is to break in the rider. The bike doesn't need it. It went through the gamut of rpms on a dyno before it left the factory.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
209 Posts
Unless you follow the break-in procedure in the owner's handbook, which according to my research may be the worst way to break in a new bike; how do/did you break in your new DL1000? Thanks
I broke mine in exactly as the owners manual suggests, runs like a top approaching 2000 miles...I will follow the instructions from the company that designed and manufactured the motorcycle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
888 Posts
I will come and break your bike in for you Beretta. But I will do the proper 5000mile break in procedure.
You're welcome!
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
17,529 Posts
I broke mine in exactly as the owners manual suggests, runs like a top approaching 2000 miles...I will follow the instructions from the company that designed and manufactured the motorcycle.
You actually followed the directions and instructions outlined by a lawyer. The only break in period is in your mind, yet many others will continue to follow the same scam.


 

·
Registered
Joined
·
209 Posts
As succinctly put in Wiki:

The goal of modern engine break-ins is the settling of piston rings into an engine's cylinder wall. A cylinder wall is not perfectly smooth but has a deliberate slight roughness to help oil adhesion. As the engine is powered up, the piston rings between the pistons and cylinder wall will begin to seal against the wall's small ridges.

Operating the bike on a light throttle actually prevents the effective sealing of the new rings and barrel.

The manufacturer's line is unchanged from the days of cast iron liners and rings, and the lower grade plain bearings used in the past.

What they should really be saying, but won't, is: 'operate your bike gently and at low speeds so that you familiarize yourself with the bike, don't become another road accident statistic, or a potential litigant against us'.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,075 Posts
I ran the piss out of mine from first start, runs like a champ. Id swear I was running a big bore bike the way it performs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
449 Posts
I ran mine at varying rpm for about 40 miles on the highway on my way home from the dealer before I cranked it up to triple digit speeds about 3 times in my 2 hour ride home. I did keep the rpm's below 7500 for the first 350 miles but then it was on. It has 1600 on it now and she runs great. I did change the oil and filter the first time at 400 miles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Well, as I expected, you guys's recommendations are all "over the board" LOL!

I did some break-in on my own: With about 60 miles on the bike, I ran it up to around 5-6000 rpm in third gear....and a little in 4th. gear, then shutting it down (in gear) and allowing it to return to around 2000 rpm and repeated that several times; but never at full throttle, only enough to hit the revs I wanted. Since then, I've ridden it rather gently, again never at full throttle, actually not more than 1/4-1/2 at most. I also had the oil changed at about 180 miles by the dealership where I bought it.

Tomorrow, my wife and I, (She rides an '09 Bandit) are taking about a 260 mile round trip tour near Roosevelt Lake just East of Phoenix. I plan to ride the Vstrom and not "baby it". Although, I will vary the rpm and when I have the opportunity, back off the throttle and let the engine "suck up" oil, etc to lube the rings, but basically, I'm gonna ride it like I stole it....so to speak. Since it's a holiday week-end, I expect little traffic.

Again, from my reading, the owner's manual's recommendation seems about the worst possible way to break in an engine.
 

·
FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
Joined
·
38,103 Posts
The common denominator to all methods is, it runs great. It doesn't matter how you break it in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Sorry, I can't agree with you...at least based on my current reading/research. I reiterate that the owner's manual recommendations seem to be the worst way to break in a new modern engine. Any research to support your position? Not trying to challenge you, just to learn. Thanks
 

·
FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
Joined
·
38,103 Posts
Every new engine is exercised on a dyno before it leaves the factory to break in the engine, including near red line under load. After that, whatever the owner does is moot. If there was a bad method, show me a post about an engine problem that can be attributed in any way to an improper break in. The engine is basically broken in before it is sold.

The only posts about oil use are about bikes that are run over 70mph for long periods. There is something about the airbox airflow design that causes oil vapor to be drawn out through the crankcase breather tubes at high speeds regardless of rpms. It happens with Vees and Wees running at vastly different rpms and it starts a little over 70mph. Somebody even put air compressor oil separators in the breather tubes and found they collected oil at a greatly increased amount over 70mph.

If you want to see some things Suzuki has written about V-Stroms that is just plain wrong, see http://www.stromtrooper.com/general...ce-manual-errors-questionable-statements.html
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
I just completed my first 600 miles today. First thing tomorrow I will do the 600 mile service. I grew up the son and grandson of great mechanics, dabbling myself in mechanics with a focus on Engineering. I understand the need for seating the rings by running the RPM up and down several times under load with acceleration and deceleration. I did a lot of that for the first 500 miles always keeping it under 4000 like Suzuki recommends. Now that I have gone over 500 miles, it's really REALLY nice to feel that power band and rev it up a little. I still plan on keeping it under 7000 until I have 1000 miles on it, again, like Suzuki recommends. Having written specifications for vehicles myself, I do not believe that the recommendations in the book are "left over" from the good old days. They are there for a reason and you should follow them to the best of your ability. They are definitely ran through a range from the factory to ensure function, the break-in is more than likely to ensure longevity.
 

·
$tromtrooper
Joined
·
2,378 Posts
There should really be in a one-and-only thread for this. A lot people have diametrically opposed opinions on this matter. So some years ago, I asked a leading motorsports engineer - a person who should have actual knowledge of the subject. I am pleased to report there is good news for everyone:

Good news #1 - you can never go wrong following MOM. There is more to running in an engine than rings and cylinders. The whole drive train is involved and benefits from proper break-in as directed.

Good news #2- with today's modern materials, manufacturing, and technology, you can probably not do too much damage if you insist (short of a hard break-in with a urine-filled crankcase like a friend-of-a-friend's uncle saw on a blog one time) on deviating from the suggested procedure.

I just did the MOM break-in on my new bike - <5k rpm, mix the gears for 600 miles. My own break-in involved the first hundred or so miles in "rain mode" to dial back throttle response until I got used to it. Ironically, now that I am free to do with it as I will, I lack the testosterone and roadways to deviate much for the break-in regimen evening in my normal riding - I think I have only been able to wind it out past 5k through 4th before both ran out. :mrgreen:
 

·
FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
Joined
·
38,103 Posts
True. What I mean more than you get the engine already broken in is that the dyno run shows the manual's procedure is violated at the factory. I have not done a good job of expressing that. Modern materials and manufacturing methods don't require the kind of wearing in they used to, especially with a liquid cooled engine.
 

·
$tromtrooper
Joined
·
2,378 Posts
Yeah, he said on cars it was mostly to run-in the transmission and differential(s) and said the tranny and such on the mc would similarly benefit.

On the GS, running-in was for 600mi/ 1000km. I mean, that is one or two weekends of taking it easy on the back roads. More important to me, was to get the fluids changed in the appropriate window. With the dealer 170mi away, I calculated out the optimum time, but couldn't get an appointment until a week later. I took shorter rides while waiting and avoided the I-state on the ride there as much as possible until the fluids were replaced. It was a speed limit+, cruise-controlled blast on the highway on the way back, though.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
17,529 Posts
The fear factor will never stop it seems, and many examples can be given of some owners thinking these bikes are made of glass. Heck I remember growing up riding minibikes/quads/3 wheelers.....and we were lucky if we ever checked the oil or air filters, they were abused and just kept on going and going. All I will do is change the oil early on a new bike, beyond that it is just ride the darn thing like I normally would.
 

·
$tromtrooper
Joined
·
2,378 Posts
The fear factor will never stop it seems, and many examples can be given of some owners thinking these bikes are made of glass. Heck I remember growing up riding minibikes/quads/3 wheelers.....and we were lucky if we ever checked the oil or air filters, they were abused and just kept on going and going. All I will do is change the oil early on a new bike, beyond that it is just ride the darn thing like I normally would.
But Wee riders, especially, have spreadsheets to fill in. :mrgreen:

It depends, too, on your relationship with bikes. If you thrash one for a couple of years, send it off to another owner, and buy another one, none of this run-in and maintenance will likely ever make a difference - God, what I've seen in parking lots :yikes: and, presumably, they got there under their own power. On the other hand, I keep a 4-wheel vehicle well over ten years on average. Bikes have seen a little more turnover in the past decade as I was upgrading. If I live to be eighty, I don't plan on purchasing another new bike (scooter, maybe) or 4-wheel vehicle. So, I, and I am sure others, like to take care with what I/we have from the outset.
 
1 - 20 of 39 Posts
Top